Poems and Essays

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Trieste Publishing Pty Limited, 11. sep. 2017 - 242 strani

About the Book

Books about English Poetry have a long history, beginning with Anglo-Saxon poetry, through the Middle Ages and the Elizabethan period of William Shakespeare, followed by The Romantic Movement, Scottish Romanticism, and the Welsh Renaissance. Titles include: A London plane-tree, and other verse, A selection from the love poetry of William Butler Yeats, Alfred Tennyson, Andrew Marvell, 1621-1678, Tercentenary Tributes, Ballads from Scottish History, Dante Gabriel Rossetti, Irish Poems, Lays of the Highlands and Islands, Matthew Arnold's Notebooks, Poems (Emily Bront ), Poems of Robert Browning, Poems of Wordsworth, Shelley and Keats, Poems, Chiefly in the Scottish Dialect, and Rupert Brooke and Skyros.

About us

Trieste Publishing's aim is to provide readers with the highest quality reproductions of fiction and non-fiction literature that has stood the test of time. Our titles are produced from scans of the original books and as a result may sometimes have imperfections. To ensure a high-quality product we have:

  • thoroughly reviewed every page of all the books in the catalog
  • repaired some of the text in some cases, and
  • rejected titles that are not of the highest quality.

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O avtorju (2017)

As Samuel Johnson said in his famous epitaph on his Irish-born and educated friend, Goldsmith ornamented whatever he touched with his pen. A professional writer who died in his prime, Goldsmith wrote the best comedy of his day, She Stoops to Conquer (1773). Amongst a plethora of other fine works, he also wrote The Vicar of Wakefield (1766), which, despite major plot inconsistencies and the intrusion of poems, essays, tales, and lectures apparently foreign to its central concerns, remains one of the most engaging fictional works in English. One reason for its appeal is the character of the narrator, Dr. Primrose, who is at once a slightly absurd pedant, an impatient traditional father of teenagers, a Job-like figure heroically facing life's blows, and an alertly curious, helpful, loving person. Another reason is Goldsmith's own mixture of delight and amused condescension (analogous to, though not identical with, Laurence Sterne's in Tristram Shandy and Johnson's in Rasselas, both contemporaneous) as he looks at the vicar and his domestic group, fit representatives of a ludicrous but workable world. Never married and always facing financial problems, he died in London and was buried in Temple Churchyard.

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