History of the United States: From the Discovery of the American Continent, to the End of the Late War, Količina 9

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A. Fullarton and Company, 1866 - 573 strani
 

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eral orders 80 Fort Washington on the Hudson 81 Defences of
85
The battle of skirmishes 90 The Hessians move up the ridge
91
CHAPTER V
97
Blunder of Mifflin 104 Remedied by Washington
104
The city of New York must be abandoned 110 Sullivans recep
109
York must be evacuated 114 His plea to congress 114 He explains
118
Washingtons conduct on the day 122 Character of Gordon as an his
124
Strength of the American position 128 Declaration of the Howes
132
American privateers 134 Army regulations adopted 135 Condition
138
The declaration of independence unites England 141 Speech of Cav
142
Fox applauded by Gibbon and Burke 144 Unsat
148
Mercilessness of Germain 152 Carletons plan of cam
162
Lees character as a commander 168 His insincerity 169
168
Confidence of John Adams 173 British ships ascend the Hudson
174
Greenes elation 180 He finds fault with Washington 180 Howe
182
WASHINGTONS RETREAT THROUGA THE JERSEYS November 17
188
Putnam crosses into the Jerseys 186 Instructions to Lee 186 Wash
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Cornwallis in New Jersey 194 Greenes neglect of orders
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Submission of Tucker 199 Of Galloway 199 Hesitation of John
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Refuses to join Washington 206 His contest with Heath 206
209
Opinions of Samuel Adams 214 Orders of Putnam 214 The Quak
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Secures all the boats 219 Proposes reform in the army 219
220
Washingtons watchword 224 Washingtons plan of attack 224
228
ton entered on both sides 233 Conduct of Rall 233 Ralls mistakes
234
Measures adopted 238 Washington not appointed dictator 238
243
Washington at Princeton 247 Battle of Princeton 248 Mercer
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The morning at Trenton 250 Washington turns towards
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Washington
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Sovereignty of the people 258 Confidence of the Amer
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Mode of electing the governor 267 Property qualification
270
Finances of the United States 323 Finances of Eng
326
Their reply 332 Demand for reënforcements 332 Reply
332
Merit of Kosciuszko 337 Greene at Philadelphia 337 Helplessness
339
CHAPTER XX
345
Retreat of the British 347 They reëmbark 348 Con
349
He defends himself 353 Howe returns to Brung
356
Advice of Gates to Saint Clair 361 Schuyler at Ticon
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CHAPTER XXII
368
The British at Fort Ann 370 A thanksgiving 370 Carleton
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Strength of Fort Stanwix 378 Advance of Herkimer
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Breymann sent to his support 384 Movement of New Hampshire
384
marches through Philadelphia 393 Encamps beyond Wilmington 393
393
Negro slaves side with the British 401 Washington
403
tice Jay 406 Gates at Stillwater 406 His strength 407 His char
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Kingston burned down 414 Perplexity of Burgoyne 414 Gates
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Loss of the American frigate 423 Billingsport deserted
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talions with Cornwallis 428 Washington retreats 428 Why victory
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CHAPTER XXVI
436
Congress has no power to levy taxes 441 Postoffice 441 Import
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northwest of the Ohio 443 Jealousy of military power 443 Effect
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tion a contradiction 450 Elements of union 450 Nationality 451
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Conways discontent 455 Letter of Reed 455 Conduct of Wilkin
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Incompetency of Gates 463 Washington suffers exquisite pain
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His enemies shrink back 464 Gates 464 Mifflin 464
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gress for separatism 470 Washington for union 470 Congress jealous
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advice of George 478 His penitence in his old age 478 Burgoynes
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Effect of his speech on the commons 484 Hartleys attempt with
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esteemed by the best men in England 493 Position of the king
495
THE UNITED STATES AND FRANCE 1778
497

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Stran 186 - If we cannot prevent vessels from passing up, and the enemy are possessed of the surrounding country, what valuable purpose can it answer to attempt to hold a post from which the expected benefit cannot be had ? I am therefore inclined to think that it will not be prudent to hazard the men and stores at Mount Washington ; but, as you are on the spot, I leave it to you to give such orders as to evacTOL. T. — 7 uating Mount Washington as you may judge best, and so far revoking the order given to...
Stran 460 - I can assure those gentlemen, that it is a much easier and less distressing thing to draw remonstrances in a comfortable room by a good fireside, than to occupy a cold bleak hill, and sleep under frost and snow, without clothes or blankets.
Stran 221 - ... service of the militia, who come in, you cannot tell how, go, you cannot tell when, and act, you cannot tell where, consume your provisions, exhaust your stores, and leave you at last at a critical moment?
Stran 221 - It is needless to add that short enlistments and a mistaken dependence upon militia have been the origin of all our misfortunes, and the great accumulation of our debt. We find, sir, that the enemy are daily gathering strength from the disaffected. This strength, like a snow-ball by rolling will increase, unless some means can be devised to check effectually the progress of the enemy's arms. Militia may possibly do it for a little...
Stran 492 - He who shall introduce into public affairs the principles of primitive Christianity will change the face of the world...
Stran 137 - It becomes evident to me then, that, as this contest is not likely to be the work of a day, as the war must be carried on systematically, and to do it you must have good officers, there are no other possible means to obtain them but by establishing your army upon a permanent footing, and giving your officers good pay.
Stran 222 - If any good officers will offer to raise men upon continental pay and establishment in this quarter, I shall encourage them to do so, and regiment them, when they have done it. If congress disapprove of this proceeding, they will please to signify it, as I mean it for the best. It may be thought...
Stran 41 - Britain has endeavored to amuse and disarm them; and that the few who still remain suspended by a hope, founded either in the justice or moderation of their late king, may at length be convinced that the valor alone of their country is to save its liberties.
Stran 51 - The idea 1JJ8' of destroying all provincial distinctions, and making everything of the most minute kind bend to what they call the good of the whole, is in other terms to say that these colonies must be subject to the government of the eastern provinces.
Stran 203 - Philadelphia, beyond all question, is the object of the enemy's movements, and nothing less than our utmost exertions will prevent General Howe from possessing it. The force I have is weak, and utterly incompetent to that end. I must, therefore, entreat you to push on with every possible succor you can bring.

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