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CENTRAL AMERICA.

General Convention, of Peace, Amity, Commerce, and Navigation, between the
United States of America, and the Federation of the Centre of America.
Negotiated at Washington, on the 5th of December, 1825. Signed on the
part of the United States, by Henry Clay, and on the part of Central America,
by Antonio José Cañas,

Art. 1. Firm and inviolable peace, etc. 2. Favors in commerce to be common to both
parties. 3. Mutual benefits in trade and residence to be equally enjoyed 43
4. Each party may carry its own produce to the republic of the other-equalization of
duties established, and to be the basis of all trade,

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5. Importations and exportations to be on a reciprocal footing. No partial prohibitions
to be established. 6. Merchants, commanders of ships, and other citizens of
both countries, &c. to manage their own business; to be treated as citizens, ete.
7. Crizens of neither of the contracting parties shall be liable to any embargo, &c.
8. Whenever the citizens of either party seek refuge in the dominions, etc of the
other, they are to be treated with humanity, &c.,

9. All ships, ete. belonging to the citizens of either party, captured by pirates, and
found within the dominions of either, to be delivered up to the owners
10. Assistance and protection to be rendered in case of wrecks, etc. within the dominions
of each other. 11. Citizens of each party, shall have power to dispose of their
goods and effects within the jurisdiction of the other, by sale, testament, or otherwise
12. Complete protection in persons and property in the territories of both nations, &c.
13. Liberty of conscience and rites of burial secured. 14. Both parties at liberty to
trade with those at enmity with either, &c.
49
Free ships to make free goods. All persons on board, except those in the actual
service of an enemy to be free. Flag covering the property to be applied to
those powers, only, who acknowledge the principle. 15. Enemy's proper y to
be protected by a neutral flag, must be shipped two months before declaration of
war, &c.
16. Contraband specified.
17. Goods not contraband. Defin. of blockade. 18. Contraband only liable to confis'n
19. In cases of blockade, vessels to be notified but not detained, &c. Vessels entering
before blockade, may quit unmolested, &c. 20. During a visit at sea, armed
vessels to remain out of reach of cannon shot. Neutrals not to go on board the
examining vessel. 21. In case of war, sea letters, certificates of cargo, &c.
to be furnished, expressing to whom the property belongs.
22. Visiting regulation to apply only to vessels without convoy. 23.

..

Established
courts only to try prize causes. Motives of condemnation to be stated. 24. The
neutral party not to accept a commission to cruise against the other. 25. In
case of war, six months allowed to those on the coast, and twelve for those in the
interior to remove effects, &c. .

26. And no sequestation of money in bank or public funds. 27. Official intercourse

in relation to public ministers, &c. to be on a reciprocal footing. 28. Each
party permitted to have consuls in each others' ports. 29. Commissions to be
exhibited before exequatur is obtained.
Consuls exempt from public service-their Archives inviolate. 31. Consuls
may call in the public authorities to aid in securing deserters, who are not to be de-
tained more than two months in prison. $2. Consular convention to be formed.
13. The following points agreed to: 1st. Treaty to remain in force twelve years.

Peace perpetual. 2nd. Citizens responsible for infringing this article. Srd.
War not to be declared, until remonstrance is made, and satisfaction is refused. 63
4th. Other treaties not to be contravened by this. Ratification within eight months 63

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COLOMBIA.

1. General Convention of Peace, Amity, Navigation and Commerce, between the
United States of America, and the Republic of Colombia, signed at Bogota
on the 3d. of Oct. 1824. Negotiated on the part of the United States by R.
C. Anderson, and Pedro Gual on the part of Colombia.

Rules of correspondence between the two nations. Negotiators.

Art. 1. Firm and inviolable peace, &c. 19. Art. 2. Favors of commerce to be com-
mon to both parties, 19. Art. 3. Citizens of the United States at liberty to
frequent all the coasts and countries of the Republic of Colombia, to reside there, &c. 21
Same in relation to citizens of Colombia, 21. Art. 4. Merchants, commanders
of ships, and other citizens of both countries, &c. to manage their own business; to
be treated as citizens of the most favored nation, 21. Art 5.Citizens of neither of the
contracting parties shall be liable to any embargo,&c. Art.6. Whenever the citizens
either party seek refuge, in the dominions, &c. of the other, they are to be treated
as friends, &c. 23. Art.7.All ships belonging to the citizens of either party captured
by pirates, and found within the dominions of either, to be delivered up to the owners
Art. 9. Assistance and protection to be rendered in case of wrecks, etc. within the domini us

of each other, 23. Art. 9. Citizens of each party shall have power to dispose
of their goods and effects within the jurisdiction of the other, by sale, testament, or
otherwise. Alien heirs allowed 3 years to dispose of their property.
Art. 10. Complete protection in persons and property in the territories, of both nations le-
gal redress, etc. 25. Art. 11. Liberty of conscience and rights of burial secured 25
Art. 12. Both parties at liberty to trade with those at enmity with either, etc.
Free ships
to make free goods, 25. All persons on board, except those in the actual service
of an enemy to be free. Flag covering the property to be applied to those powers,
only, who acknowledge the principle, 27. Art. 13. Enemy 's property, to be pro-
tected by a neutral flag, must be shipped two months before declaration of war, etc.
Contraband specified, 27. Art. 15. Goods not contraband, 29. Definition of
blockade, 29. Art. 16. Contraband only liable to confiscation
In cases of blockade, vessels to be notified but not detained, etc.
Vessels entering before blockade, may quit unmolested, etc.

Art. 18. During a visit at sea, armed vessels to remain out of reach of cannon shot. Neutrals
not to go on board the examining vessel, 31. In case of war, sea letters, certifi-
cates of cargo, &c. to be furnished, expressing to whom the property belongs.
Visiting regulations to apply only to vessels without convoy.
Established courts only to try prize causes.

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33

Motives of condemnation to be stated 33
The neutral party not to accept a commission to cruise against the other... 33
In case of war, 6 months allowed to those on the coast, and 12 for those the in-

terior to remove effects, &c. 33. Art. 24. And no sequestration of money in
bank or public funds. 35. Art. 25. Official intercourse in relation to public
ministers, &c. to be on a reciprocal footing, 35. Art. 26. Each party permit-
ted to have consuls in each others ports, 35. Art. 27. Commissions to be exhi-
bited before exequatur is obtained, 35. Art. 28. Consuls exempt from public
service their archives inviolate, 35. Art. 29. Consuls may call in the public
authorities to aid in securing deserters, who are not to be detained more than 2 months
in prison, 37. Art. 30. Consular convention to be formed.
Art. 31. The following points agreed to: 1st. Treaty to remain in force twelve years.
Peace perpetual. 37. 24. Citizens responsible for infringing this article
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3d. War not to be declared, until remonstrance is made, and satisfaction is refused. 39
4th. Other treaties not to be contravened by this. Ratification within eight months 39

Art. 17.

Art. 20.
Art. 21.
Art. 22.
Art. 23.

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MEXICO.

1. Treaty of Amity, Commerce and Navigation, between the United States of America
and the United Mexican States, concluded at Mexico, on the 5th of April, 1831,
by A. Butler, on the part of the United States, and Lucas Alaman, and Rafael
Mangino, on the part of Mexico'.

• 82*
82*

Art. 1. Universal peace and sincere friendship, 82*. 2. Basis-perfect equality and reci-
procity, 82*. 3. Freedom to visit all ports, hire warehouses, &c.
Duties, &c. same as most favored nations. Coasting trade always excepted
4. Duties on importation into Mexico, same as on like articles into the United States 82*
Export duties, same as to other foreign nations, 84*. 5. Light, or harbor dues, pi-
lotage and salvage, same as in United States, 84*. 6. Duties, drawbacks, &c. on
imports or exports, same, whether made in Mexican or United States vessels, of the
growth of either country, 84*. 7. Brokers, factors, etc. to be chosen as the par-
ties may think fit, 86*. 8. No embargo or detention with ut compensation.
9. Exemption from compulsory service, 86*. 10. Refuge from stress of weather, en-
enemies, etc. provided for, 86*. 11. Vessels, etc. captured by pirates, to be
given up, 86.* 12. Assistance in case of wreck, etc. 88.*
sal of property, by will or s le, same as native eit.zens, 88 *
tion to pers ns and property; tribunals of justice open, etc.
Liberty of conscience, and privilege of sepulchre
16. Free trade with those at enmity with either party-Free ships make free goods.

The flag to protect the passengers

And to cover property to apply to those who acknowledge the principle

17. Neutral property on board enemy vessels, to be considered enemies' property, and
liable to confiscation. 18 Contraband specified. 19 Things not enumerated free 94*
20. Contraband articles only to be condenined, the rest of the cargo to be free,
21, In case of blockade, warning to be given, 22 Rules of visit to be established,
23. In case of war, sea letters to be furnished, expressing name, property, &c.,
24. Rules for the examination of vessels, to apply only to vessels without convoy,

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94*

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13. Right of dispo

14. Special protec-

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Established prize courts only to take cognizance of prize canses
26 In case of war, six month's notice, to merchants on the coast, and twelve for those in

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the interior. Other trades may remain with their property unmolested
• 98.
27. Public ministers granted the same immunities, etc. as the most favored nations
98*
28. Consuls to exhibit their patent; and admitted in all ports open to foreign commerce 100*
29. Consuls and their officers exempt from all local taxes. 103*. 30. Consuls may
call in the aid of the authorities to arrest deserters. 100.* 31. Provision form-
ing a consular convention. 102*. 32. Interior commerce to be regulated by
mutual agreement-but, in the meantime, to be conducted as heretofore with Mis-
souri. 102*. 53. Indian hostilities on the respective boundaries to be restrained
by force. 102*. Captives to be set free, and returned to their own territories
34. Points to be observed, to preserve a good understanding.

1st. Treaty to remain in force 8 years; after that period, one year's notice to termi-
nate it. 104*. 2nd. Citizens to be held personally responsible for infringing it. 104*
3. Before war, a statement of injuries to be presented, and justice demanded
Fifth and sixth articles to be suspended for six years

106*
106*

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Treaty of 224 February, 1819, confirmed. Art. 1. Third and fourth articles to
be carried into full effect. 2. Boundaries designated.
3. Commissioner and surveyor to be appointed
Additional article to the [above] Treaty of Limits

90*
92*

2. Treaty of Limits, between the United States of America, and the United Mexican
States, negotiated on the part of the United States by A. Butler, and on the
part of the United Mexican States by Lucas Alaman, and Rafael Mangino, on
the 5th of April, 1831, .

110*

104*
104*

110*
• 112*

. 114.

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LAWS, &c.

LAWS, &c. of the United States, relative to Public Ministers, Consuls, Conven-
page

tions, Equalization of Duties, Slave Trade, &c.,

No. 1 Act fixing the Compensation of Public Ministers, and of Consuls, residing on the
coast of Barbary,
May 1, 1810,
[Ministers plenipotentiaries $9000 per annum, (and $9000 outfit) secretaries of
legation $2000, charge des affaires $4,500, on the Barbary coast $2000. Consul
general at London and Paris $2000 each by usage.]

2. Privileges of Foreign Ministers-Extract from the Act of April 30, 1790

[For Privileges, etc. of Ambassadors, see No. 55, from page 396 to 409.]
3. Act concerning consuls and vice-consuls,

April 14, 1792,
4. Act supplementary to the [above] “act concerning consuls and vice-consuls,” and for
the further protection of American seamen,
February 28, 1303,

[On consuls, etc., see No. 120 to 164, from page 427 to 458.]

5. Equalization of Duties.-Act to repeal so much of the several acts imposing duties
on the tonnage of ships and vessels, and on goods, wares and merchandise imported
into the U. States, as imposes a Discriminating Duty on tonnage, between foreign
vessels, and vessels of the United States, and between goods imported into the
United States in foreign vessels, and vessels of the United States, March 3, 1815,
[Contingent repeal of discriminating duties, in favor of foreign countries.]
6. Deposite of Foreign Consular Papers. Act anthorizing the deposite of the papers of
March 3, 1817,
March 2, 1819,
March 1, 1817,
April 18, 1818,
May 15, 1820,
the intercourse

foreign vessels, with the consul of their respective nations
7. Passenger Vessels. Act regulating passenger ships and vessels
8. Navigation.-Act concerning the navigation of the U. States

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9. Supplementary to [the above] an act concerning navigation
10. British American and West India Intercourse.-Act to regulate

between the U. States and certain Brit, American Colonial ports March 1, 1823,
President's Proclamation. [Trade with certain British Colonial ports prohibited—
Revival by acts of congress concerning navigation of 1818 and 820,] March 17, 1827, 100
12, Act to amend the acts regulating the commercial intercourse between the United
States, and certain Colonies of Great Britain
May 29, 1830, 102
13. Proclamation of the president, declaring the ports of the United States to be open
to British vessels with their cargoes, from certain British Colonial ports,
October 5, 1850,
14. Act to equalize the duties on vessels of the republic of Colombia and their cargoes
April 20, 1826, 104
15, Slave Trade.-Act to prohibit the carrying on the slave trade from the United
March 24, 1794, 105

States, to any foreign place or country
[Forfeiture of vessels, etc.-Penalties for building, fitting out.-Bond for suspected
vessels.-Penalty for concealing slaves.]

16. Act in addition to the above act, etc.

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May 10, 1800, 106

[Forfeiture of interest in slave vessels.-Penalty.-Punishment for serving on
board.-Seizure of vessels and crews by ships-of-war.-Trial of offences.-Appli-
cation of forfeitures.]

17, Act to prevent the importation of certain persons into certain states, where, by the
laws thereof, their admission is prohibited.
February 28, 1803, 107
[Importation of negroes for sale.- Prohibition of negroes, not natives, into certain
states.-Penalties for offences, etc.]

18. Act to prohibit the importation of slaves into any port or place, within the juris-
diction of the U. States, from, and after Jan. 1, 1808
March 2, 1807 108
[Forfeiture of vessels fitting out, or sailing for slave trade.-Penalties for fitting out.

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Slave Trade-

and for receiving slaves for traffic.-Forfeiture of vessels which have carried slaves,
Disposal of the negroes.-Punishment for slave dealing.-Penalty for sale of slaves
imported.-Forfeiture of vesssls having slaves on board-Punishment of com-
manders-Employment of ships-of-war-Penalty for conveying slaves for sale,
in v'sls under 40 tons.-Regulations for vessels carrying slaves for sale, coastwise.]
19. Act [in addition to the above act, of March 2, 1807,] to prohibit the introduction of
slaves, etc. and to repeal certain parts of the same
April 20, 1818, 114
[Importation of slaves in any manner whatever, for sale, prohibited.-Forfeiture of
vessel.-Vessels built for slave-trade forfeited.—Penalty.--Punishment for convey-
ing negroes from Africa, etc. not held to service as slaves. --Disposal of negroes
imported.-Penalty for holding, importing, or selling imported slaves.--Repeal of
part of act of 1807.]

20. Act in addition to the act, prohibiting the Slave Trade,
March 5, 1819, 116
[Employment of ships of war-Seizure of slave vessels—Distribution of proceeds;
Punishment of offenders—Disposal of negroes—Agents on the coast of Africa—
Bounty for captured negroes-Penalty for holding negroes imported-bounty to
informers-Port of adjudication-Repeal of repugnant acts-appropriation of
money-See in connexion with the second section of this convention, the opinion
of the Attorney General of the United States, page 695]

21. Act appropriating $30,000 for the suppression of the slave trade, May 24, 1828. 119
22. Crimes.-Act more effectually to provide for the punishment of certain crimes

against the United States, and other purposes

March 3, 1825, 119

[General act for punishing offenders.]

23. Piracy.-Act to continue in force "an act to protect the commerce of the United
States, and punish the crime of piracy;" and also to make further provision for
punishing the crime of piracy

May 15, 1820, 122
January 7, 1824, 124

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24. Act concerning Discriminating Duties of tonnage and impost

[Netherlands, Prussia, Hanseatic Cities, Oldenburgh, Norway, Sardinia and
Russia, exempt from discriminating duties.]

25. Proclamation declaring discriminating duties to be suspended so far as they relate
to the subjects of the Pope, June 7, 1827.

26, Act in addition to "an act concerning discriminating duties” &c, to equalize duties
on Prussian vessels and cargoes,
May 24, 1828, 126
27. Proclamation suspending discrim. duties on vessels &c. of the kingdom of Hanover 127
28. Proclamation suspending discriminating duties on vessels, &c. of Austria, June3,1829 128
29, Proclamation suspending discriminating duties on vessels, &c. of Oldenburg
September 18, 1830
30. France.-Act for carrying into effect the convention of Navigation and Commerce,
between the United States and France,
March 3, 1825, 131

51. Act regulating commercial intercourse with the islands of Martinique and Gua-
May 9, 1828, 132

daloupe,

32. Apprehension of Deserters.-Act to provide for their apprehension, March 2, 1829, 132
33, Russia.-Act for the punishment of contraventions of the 5th article of the treaty
between the United States and Russia, (see page 446 Vol. 1.) May 19, 1828, 133
34, Denmark.-Act to provide for the adjustment of claims, etc., under the convention
of March 28, 1830, (see page 453, Vol. 1.)
Feb. 25, 1831, 134
35. France.-Act to carry into effect the convention, concluded at Paris, on the 4th of
July, 1831-(see page 524, Vol. 1.)
July 13, 1832 137
36, Colombia.-Act giving effect to a comm. arrangement with the U. S. May 19, 1832 139
37, Portugal.-Act to exempt Portuguese vessels from the payment of duties on


May 25, 1832, 139
July 13, 1832, 139

tonnage,

38. pain. Act concerning tonnage duties on Spanish vessels,

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