Slike strani
PDF
ePub

2. To those who are graduates of other institutions of good standing, and who hold Bachelor's degrees substantially equal to those conferred by the University.

In the case of students not graduates of the University of Chicago, applications for admission should be accompanied by the Bachelor's diploma, or other official evidence of graduation.

It should be noted that admission to a Graduate School does not necessarily admit to candidacy for a higher degree.

UNITS OF WORK A course of instruction offered daily (i. e., four or five days a week) throughout a quarter is called a major. A course offered daily throughout a term is called a minor. The credit for a seminar course is variable. The following abbreviations are used: M=Minor coursera single course for six weeks. DM=Double Minor coursera double course two hours daily for six weeks. Mj=Major coursera single course for twelve weeks. DM;=Double Major course a double course for twelve weeks.

DEGREES I. The Master's degrees.-Three degrees are conferred, viz., Master of Arts, Master of Science, and Master of Philosophy. The A.M. degree follows the A.B. degree, the S.M. the S.B., and the Ph.M. the Ph.B.

1. Candidacy.-Any member of the Graduate Schools who has been in attendance one quarter or more, and whose undergraduate course is equivalent to that required for a corresponding Bachelor's degree in the University of Chicago,' may, on recommendation by the department or departments in which he is working, be enrolled by vote of the Faculties of the Graduate Schools, as a candidate for a Master's degree. Admission to candidacy must precede the conferring of the degree, by at least two months.

2. Requirements. Students thus accepted as candidates will be given a Master's degree on fulfilment of the following requirements:

a) At least three quarters' residence at the University.

b) At least eight majors of resident graduate work. These eight majors Deed not be all in one department, but must be selected according to some rational plan, approved by the Deans of the Graduate Schools at least six months before the degree is conferred. The individual courses must receive the approval of the heads of the departments concerned. It is understood that no work offered in correspondence will be accepted as satisfying this minimum requirement.

c) A satisfactory dissertation on a subject approved by one of the depart. ments in which the work is done.

1 Attention is particularly called to the fact that the term "equivalent" in this connection refers to quantity only. It does not affect the question of the specific Master's degree (Arts, Science, or Philosophy) to which a given student's work would lead. Thus a student may have received an A.B. degree for a course of study which at the University of Chicago would have led to the S.B. degree. In such case the Master's degree would be S.M. In case the candidate did not obtain his Bachelor's degree at the University of Chicago, be will present to the Examiner on blanks furnished for the purpose a detailed statement of his undergraduate work. The Examiner cannot always report upon these statemente during the opening week of the quarter.

d) The thesis must be in finished form before the examination is taken.

e) The delivery of five printed or type-written copies, including one bound copy, of the dissertation to the University Library, three weeks before the Convocation at which the degree is to be conferred.

e) A satisfactory examination on the work taken for the degree.

NOTE.-Courses announced as Junior College courses are never counted toward a Master's degree. Some Senior College courses taken by graduate students may, with the approval of the department concerned, be so counted.

II. The degree of Doctor of Philosophy.

1. Candidacy.-Any member of the Graduate Schools who has been in attendance one quarter or more, whose undergraduate course is equivalent 1 to that required for a Bachelor's degree in the University of Chicago, whose thesis subject has been accepted by the principal department, and who has a reading knowledge of French and German (which must be certified by those departments at least six months before examination on the principal subject) may, on recommendation by the principal department in which he wishes to take his degree, be enrolled, by vote of the Faculties of the Graduate Schools, as a candidate for the Doctor's degree.

2. Requirements. -Students thus accepted as candidates will be given the Doctor's degree, on the fulfilment of the following requirements:

a) At least three years of resident work at the University (see 3 and 4 below), in pursuance of an accepted course of study. The course in question must include one principal, and either one or two secondary subjects. The amount of work required in the secondary subject or subjects, is nine majors.

b) A satisfactory final examination upon the work done in preparation for the degree.

c) The presentation of a satisfactory printed thesis upon a subject which has been approved by the head of the department in which the principal part of the candidate's work has been done.

d) A good command of literary expression, and such knowledge of subjects considered fundamental as may be prescribed by the several departments.

e) Candidates for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy may not, as a rule, take more than two-thirds of their work in one department, and may not take work which is to count toward the degree in more than three departments.

3. Non-resident work.-After being admitted to the Graduate Schools, the student may be allowed to substitute non-resident work for resident work to a limited extent, under conditions to be arranged in consultation with the Dean and the heads of the departments concerned.

4. Work done in other universities.-Graduate work done in another university will be accepted as equivalent to resident work in the University of Chicago, provided the institution in which the work was done is of high standing, and sufficient evidence is furnished that the particular work was satisfactorily performed.

Work done in other universities will not ordinarily count for more than one and one-half years of resident work in the University; but the degree of

a

1 See footnote, p. 127.

Doctor of Philosophy may, in exceptional cases, be granted after one year of residence.

5. Thesis.—Each student is required to prepare a thesis upon some question connected with his principal subject. This production must constitute an actual contribution to knowledge. Its subject must be submitted for approval to the head of the department at least twelve months before the date of the final examination; the thesis itself must be submitted in written form to the head of the department three months before the date of the final examination.

6. Publication of Thesis.—Before the meeting of the Graduate Faculties at which the degree is to be recommended a type-written copy of the thesis is filed in the office of the Deans of the Graduate Schools. To the copy is attached a certificate, signed by the Head or Acting Head of the Department, that the material, in form and substance as submitted for publication, is accepted as the candidate's thesis for the Doctor's degree. Said copy and certificate may not be withdrawn from the office of the Deans of the Graduate School until the required printed copies are deposited in the library. These copies become the property of the University. Two of these copies are offered bound in boards in a style approved by the Librarian of the University, from whom samples may be secured upon application.

The candidate elects one of the following methods of satisfying the publication requirement:

First, a signed statement is filed in the Graduate Office from a publishing agency approved technically by the Press, and also to its professional responsibility by the department concerned, that the thesis has been received and accepted for publication.

Second, the candidate executes to the University of Chicago Press his own obligation to cover the cost of satisfying the publication requirements. The director of the Press determines the amount of the obligation and requires guarantors at his discretion. The obligation matures not later than one year from the date of the conferring of degree.

Third, the candidate secures publication of the thesis in the form prescribed by the University, through some medium not referred to under the first and second alternatives. In this case the degree is conferred only after the delivery of the required copies to the General Library.

In case the first or second alternative is elected, the candidate executes a contract in legal form, and deposits the same in the General Library to the effect that he will furnish the General Library with one hundred reprints, which shall fulfill in format, cover, title-page, and stock, all the University requirements.

7. Final examination.–After admission to candidacy, the student may present himself for examination in his secondary subject or subjects as soon as he has fulfilled the requirements of the department or departments concerned. He may present himself for the examination in his principal subject, or in both principal and secondary subjects if the examination in the latter has not been taken in advance, (1) as soon as he has fulfilled the requirements of clause 1 above, (2) as soon as he has fulfilled the requirements of the department or departments concerned, and (3) after he has presented to the Dean a written certificate from the principal department concerned that the thesis is ready for the printer. The examination will be conducted by a com. mittee consisting of the members of the principal department concerned, an appointed representative of the secondary department, or a representative of each of them if there are two, of any other members of the secondary department who may choose to attend, and a member of some other department appointed by the Deans of the Graduate Schools. If the examinations in the secondary subjects are separated, they may not be held in the same quarter, or within two months of each other.

The candidate is required to prepare a typewritten or printed brief of his work, including an analysis of the thesis, and to file six copies of the same with his Dean for distribution to the committee one week before the time set for the examination. In the case of the examination in the secondary department, the statement should include the work in this department, and the statement for the final examination should include all the work presented for the degree.

REMARK.—The degree of Doctor of Philosophy is given, not on the basis of the completion of a certain amount of time spent upon a specified programme, but as the recognition and mark of high attainments and ability in the candidate's chosen province, shown first by the production of a thesis evincing the power of independent investigation and forming an actual contribution to existing knowledge; and secondly, by the passing of examinations covering the general field of the candidate's subjects, with more minuteness in the case of the principal subject, with less minuteness in the case of the secondary subject or subjects.

NOTE.-In order to avoid misunderstandings, candidates for higher degrees should consult with their Deans concerning all technical requirements for such degroos, before application is made for admission to candidacy.

FELLOWSHIPS AND SCHOLARSHIPS The Trustees of the University have established the following Fellowships and Scholarships:

1. The University Fellowships.—The University appropriates annually the amount of twenty-one thousand, five hundred dollars ($21,500) for Fellow. ships in the Graduate Schools. These Fellowships are awarded by the Trustees, upon the recommendation of the President and the nomination of particular departments, to graduate students who desire to pursue advanced work in some special line. About seventy Fellowships, ranging in individual value from $120, or tuition fees of a student for three quarters, to $520 are assigned each year.

2. Applications for Fellowships.-Applications for Fellowships should be addressed to the Deans of the Graduate Schools of the University, and should be in their hands on or before March 1.

· 3. Appointments to Fellowships.

a) Date.—The annual assignment of Fellowships is made about the first of April. A Fellowship is available for any three of the four quarters, beginning with the Summer Quarter, following the date of appointment.

b) Attainments required.—The candidate must have attained proficiency in some department. In general, he should have spent at least one year in resident study after receiving his Bachelor's degree. In making the appointment, special weight is given to theses indicating the candidate's ability to conduct original investigation.

4. Special Fellowships. In addition to the regular University Fellowships mentioned above, there are special Fellowships offered by individuals. These vary somewhat in number and amount from year to year. At present they are as follows:

a) The William A. and Fanny C. Talcott Fellowships and Scholarships. -In 1896 William A. Talcott, of Rockford, Ill., endowed four Fellowships and Scholarships, two of which bear his name and two the name of his wife, Fanny C. Talcott. They are intended primarily for the benefit of graduates of Rockford College, but, in the absence of such beneficiaries, may be assigned to others. They pay the tuition fees of those appointed to them.

b) The Bucknell Fellowship, yielding $400, offered by Mr. Charles Miller, of Franklin, Pa., is open to graduates of Bucknell University. The appointment to this Fellowship is made by the faculty of Bucknell University.

c) The Joseph B. Loewenthal Fellowship in Chemistry, endowed by Mr. Berthold Loewenthal, of Chicago, as a memorial of his son, Joseph B. Loewenthal. It yields about $420 to the incumbent annually appointed, and is awarded on the nomination of the Department of Chemistry and the recommendation of the President of the University.

d) The Gustavus F. Swift Fellowship in Chemistry, endowed by Mrs. Gustavus S. Swift, Chicago, as a memorial of her husband, Gustavus F. Swift. It yields about $520 to the incumbent annually appointed, and is awarded for especial ability in research on the nomination of the Department of Chemistry and the recommendation of the President of the University.

5. Graduate Scholarships.—The Scholarships available for students in the Graduate Schools are as follows:

a) Scholarships for excellence in the work of the Senior Colleges.--The University offers twenty Scholarships for excellence in the work of the Senior Colleges. The Scholarships are assigned annually, in the Spring Quarter, on the nomination of the Board of the Senior Colleges. Each department of the University, with the approval of the Committee on Scholarships, has the privilege of naming a student who is for that year the honor student of the Senior Colleges in that department, and to this student there is given a Grad. uate Scholarship yielding in each case a sum equal to the University tuition fees for three quarters ($120), provided the student continues his studies in the Graduate Schools.

6) The William A. and Fanny C. Talcott Fellowships and Scholarships. -See Fellowships.

c) Affiliation Scholarships.—Under the conditions of affiliation with Kalamazoo College, Des Moines College, Butler College, and John B. Stetson University, the three students who stand highest in scholarship and general excellence in the graduating class of each institution are awarded Scholar. ships covering the University tuition fees for three quarters ($120). This arrangement continues in force until 1910.

d) Scholarships for Public Speaking.-Three Scholarships, each yielding the amount of forty dollars ($40), or the tuition fee for a quarter, are awarded the winners in the preliminary contests in Public Speaking. In case the winner in a preliminary contest has previously secured a Scholarship in this way in the Graduate Schools, the award is made to the second in rank.

« PrejšnjaNaprej »