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different types of organization develop; third, courses in Educational Psychology and Mental Development; fourth, courses in Educational Methods; and fifth, courses in General Principles of Education and Special Problems.

Attention should be called, in connection with this last-mentioned group, to a large number of courses that are offered for teachers in other departments of the University. Such courses deal with the methods of arranging the subject-matter of these special departments.

The intimate relation of the general courses in Education to various other scientific departments may also be pointed out. The courses in Psychology furnish an important introduction to the special work in Educational Psychology as well as to the courses in general principles and methods. Biological sciences furnish a general background for the study of psychological and educational problems. The Department of Sociology and Anthropology contributes to the special discussions of social problems as related to Education; and the general principles of Philosophy are constantly involved in the treatment of educational and social organizations.

The University High School (academic and manual training), enrolling about five hundred and sixty pupils, and the University Elementary School, with about four hundred pupils, constitute a laboratory for scientific research in educational problems. The most intimate relation is maintained between the Graduate Department of Education and these schools.

In addition to the apparatus of the general experimental laboratory of the Department of Psychology, there is in the School of Education a small collection of apparatus for demonstration and an adequate supply of experimental apparatus for investigation of special problems, such as are announced in the courses in Educational Psychology.

The officers of the School of Education edit two journals: The School Review, which deals with the problems of secondary education, and The Ele. mentary School Teacher, which deals with problems of elementary education.

COURSES OF INSTRUCTION

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2. European Education: Ancient and Mediaeval Periods.-An outline course treating of the development of educational institutions and ideals in Europe to the close of the Middle Ages. For Senior College and graduate students. Mj. Autumn Quarter, AssOCIATE PROFESSOR OWEN.

3. European Education: Modern Period.--An outline course treating of the development of education in Europe in modern times. For Senior College and graduate students. Mj. Winter Quarter, ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR OWEN.

8. Education during the Renaissance. A study of the educational aspect of the Renaissance period in Italy and northern Europe, based on the extant sources. For graduate students. Mj. Winter Quarter, Associate PROFESSOR OWEN.

9. History of Education in England from the Reformation to 1640.–This course traces the growth of English educational institutions—their aims, organization, curriculum, and methods. Particular emphasis is laid on the later period in its relation to American Colonial Education. A graduate course providing opportunity for original investigation, with lectures, reading, and reports. Mj. Autumn Quarter, Dr. JERNEGAN.

12. Education during the Seventeenth and Eighteenth Centuries.-A study of the educational development in Europe from the Thirty Years' War to the French Rovolution. For graduate students. Mj. Winter Quarter, ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR OWEN.

14. History of Education in America to 1783.—The founding and growth of educational institutions in the Colonies, with a comparison of their aims and organization, and the development of the curriculum. The subject will be closely connected with economic and social conditions as factors in determining educational progress. A graduate course providing opportunity for original investigation, with lectures, readings, and reports. Mj. Summer and Winter Quarters, DR. JERNEGAN.

18. Education in the United States in the Nineteenth Century.- The course deals particularly with the problems of education during the period named, with special reference to the social, political, and philosophic ideas underlying the attempts at their solution. Effort is made to set forth the phases of educational theory of the century as developed and put into practice in America. The course is conducted by lecture and report. The bibliography of the main sources is presented, and all the work of the student is based on these sources. For graduate students. Mj. Spring Quarter, AssOCIATE PROFESSOR OWEN.

22. Seminar in the History of Education.—Mj. Spring Quarter, AssocIATE PROFESSOR OWEN.

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ADMINISTRATIVE AND SOCIAL ASPECTS OF EDUCATION 31. School Administration and Supervision.-For superintendents, principals, supervisors, and other students of education. The purpose of the course is to present the theory and practice relating to administration, organization, supervision and general management of schools. It is expected that there will be opportunity for classroom conferences and discussions. For graduate students and Senior College students. M. First Term, Summer Quarter, MR. KENDALL.

34. State and Municipal School Systems of the United States.-A study will be made of certain state and city school systems, the attempt being to select a few examples of what may be regarded as the best types of organization of public education, and a few of the opposite character. The object in study will be, through acquaintance with what has been tried and proved, to arrive at as clear a judgment as may be as to what is fundamentally sound in organization and administration, and to note what modifications are required by local conditions. For graduate and Senior College students. Mj. Autumn Quarter, PROFESSOR BUTLER.

41. The Schools of Germany, England, and the United States.—The course traces the historical development of existing systems of elementary and secondary education as expressions of the religious, social, and industrial ideals that from time to time have dominated the people, with especial emphasis upon the influence on public education of ecclesiasticism, humanism, realism, and nationalism. The marks which these schools have in common, as well as those which differentiate them, are noted, and a study is made of present tendencies. For graduate students; open also to Senior College students with two majors in Education. M. First Term, Summer Quarter; Mj. Autumn Quarter, PROFEBSOR BUTLER.

50. Philosophy of Education. The point of view will be that of the gradual socialization of the child, and the part which education plays in this. Both formal and informal education will be considered as the justification for a psychological theory of education; on the other side, the demands of the society into which the child is entering will suggest the sociological theory. The inadequacies of each will be indicated, and the necessity of replacing them by a social conception of education which can recognize both the child and society at once. The chief features of present school practice and theory will be criticized from this standpoint. Primarily for graduate students. M. Spring Quarter, PROFESSOR MEAD.

54. Seminar: Moral Education.--A general consideration of the processes and agencies of moral development in the race and the individual, with special investigation of existing or proposed agencies of the school, such as corporate life, methods of study and discipline, subject matter of the curriculum, specific moral instruction. Mj. Winter Quarter, M., 4:00-6:00, PROFESSOR TUFTS.

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EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY AND MENTAL DEVELOPMENT 68. Individual Psychology.-Problems regarding methods of studying individual variations in temperament, capacity, and development. Laboratory equipment for the investigation of special problems will be provided, so far as practicable. For graduate students. Mj. Winter Quarter, Assistant PROFESSOR GORE.

69. Genetic Psychology.-A course of lectures and reading in which a general summary will be presented of the results which have been obtained by the study of mental development in children and the experimental inves. tigations which have been carried on in various forms of learning. For graduate and Senior College students. Mj. Winter Quarter, Dr. FREEMAN.

71. Introduction to Experimental Education.—Lectures and discussions illustrated by laboratory and school experiments designed to acquaint the student with experimental methods applicable to the study of school probleins, and with the general results of recent investigations. Both psychological and statistical methods will be discussed and illustrated by typical problems. For graduate and Senior College students. Mj. Autumn Quarter, ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR DEARBORN.

75. The Psychology of Reading.-A review of the investigations of recent years and their application to the problems of the teaching of reading. The experimental work will be fully illustrated. Graduate coures, open to Senior College students. Mj. Autumn Quarter, AssocIATE PROFESSOR DEARBORN.

76. The Psychology of Writing.-A review of the investigations of recent years and their application to the problems of the teaching of writing. The experimental work will be fully illustrated. Graduate course, open to Senior College students. Mj. Winter Quarter, Dr. FREEMAN.

77. Educational Tests.- In this course the various tests for the senses and for the higher mental and motor processes, will be demonstrated and criticized. Members of the class will undertake the practical application of some of these tests and will be required to report their results. Primarily for graduate students; open to Senior College students. Mj. Spring Quarter, Dr. FREEMAN.

80, 81, 82. Experimental Problems in Education.-Students qualified by previous training will be assigned problems for experimental investigation. The results of these investigations will be subjected to individual criticism and to general discussion by the class as a whole. Elaborate reports will be required from members of the class. For graduate students. Mj. Autumn, Winter, and Spring Quarters, PROFESSOR JUDD AND ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR DEARBORN.

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85. General Principles of Method.-Fundamental principles of class teaching from psychological and social points of view; conditions favorable to development; spirit of the schoolroom; kinds of lessons; conduct of a reci. tation; methods of study; lesson units, etc. For high-school teachers, special teachers, and graduate students. M. Summer Quarter; Mj. Autumn Quarter, AssOCIATE PROFESSOR PARKER.

87. Principles of Method for Elementary Teachers.-Observation and discussion of lessons in the elementary schools, as a basis for the development of principles of method. Preparation of lesson plans exemplifying these

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principles. For Senior College students and graduates preparing to become critic teachers and supervisors. Mj. Winter Quarter, ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR PARKER.

88. Development of Modern Methods of Teaching in Elementary Schools. -School practice at the end of the eighteenth century: Rousseau's new basis; Pestalozzian methods in perception, language, number, etc., as a basis of nineteenth-century development; the method of social education. Senior College students; may be taken for graduate credit with extra assignments. Mj. Autumn Quarter; M. Summer Quarter, ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR PARKER.

89. Methods of Teaching in High Schools.-Advantages and disadvantages of different forms of class instruction. American and European types. Observation of teaching in Chicago high schools. Training in criticizing lessons and texts from the standpoint of principles of method. For graduate and Senior College students. Mj. Winter Quarter, ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR PARKER.

92. Criticism and Supervision of Teaching.–Problems of critic teachers and supervisors in normal schools and city systems. Standards and tests of teaching, means of improvement, etc. For graduate students. Mj. Spring Quarter, AssOCIATE PROFESSOR PARKER.

GENERAL PRINCIPLES AND SPECIAL PROBLEMS OF EDUCATION 104. Advanced Principles of Education.-A limited number of advanced students will be admitted to this course, which will treat, in the form of reports and lectures, a number of typical educational problems. For graduate students. Mj. Spring Quarter, PROFESSOR JUDD.

107. Current Problems in Education.-A general survey will be given in this course, by means of lectures and reports, of the topics under discussion in current educational literature. For graduate students. Mj.

Mj. Spring Quarter, AssistaNT PROFESSOR GORE.

108. Contemporary German and French Pedagogy.-A course of lectures and readings dealing with current French and German writings on educational experiments and theories. For graduate students. Mj. Autumn Quarter, DR. FREEMAN.

III. The Course of Study in the Elementary Schools. For teachers in elementary schools and normal schools; also for superintendents and princi. pals in charge of instruction. The purpose of this course is, first, to present the principles underlying the work of the elementary schools, in the light of increased demands upon the schools; and, secondly, to discuss the teaching of several of the subjects in the course of study. For graduate students and Senior College students. M. First Term, Summer Quarter, MR. KENDALL.

115. Problems in Secondary Education.-Present-day ideals in education. The moral element in education. Adolescence and education. The highschool curriculum. Arts and technology in secondary education. Electives in secondary education. The extension of the high-school course by the addition of two years. The certificate and entrance examination systems. The social organization of the high school. Athletics in education. The school and the community. On sending boys and girls to college. For graduate and Senior College students. Mj. Spring Quarter, PROFESSOR BUTLER.

117. Mental Deficiency and Retardation in School. This course will include a discussion of the more general questions of nervous and mental hygiene affecting the physical and mental welfare of normal as well as excep. tional children, but is directed with primary reference to the problems of mental and moral deficiency and retardation. For graduate and Senior College students. Mj. Spring Quarter, AssociaTE PROFESSOR DEARBORN.

120. Industrial Education. A course of lectures dealing with the devel. opment of industrial education, its newer phases in America and abroad, and its relation to other forms of the manual arts. For Senior College and graduate students. Mj. Spring Quarter, PROFESSOR SARGENT.

122. General Principles of Manual Training and Art as Related to Education.-A course of lectures dealing with the formulation of courses of study in the manual arts in elementary and advanced schools. For Senior College and graduate students. Mj. Summer, Autumn and Winter Quarters, PROFESSOR SARGENT.

123. Materials Relating to Drawing and Manual Training.--A course of lectures and demonstrations dealing with the educational aims and purposes of different phases of the manual arts. First term, elementary schools; second term, advanced schools. For graduate and Senior College students. Mj. Summer Quarter, PROFESSOR SARGENT.

124. The Materials Relating to Drawing and Manual Training in Elementary Schools. -A course of lectures and demonstrations dealing with the educational aims and purposes of different phases of the manual arts in elementary schools. For Senior College students. Mj. Autumn Quarter, PROFESSOR SARGENT.

125. The Materials Relating to Drawing and Manual Training in Advanced Schools.-A course of lectures and demonstrations dealing with the educational aims and purposes of different phases of the manual arts in advanced schools. For Senior College and graduate students. Mj. Winter Quarter, PROFESSOR SARGENT.

126. Supervisors' Course in the Principles of Drawing and Manual Training.-A limited number of advanced students will be admitted to this course, which will treat, in the form of reports based upon observation, the organization of the work in the manual and industrial arts, in schools of vari. ous grades and under different social conditions. For graduate students. Mj. Spring Quarter, PROFESSOR SARGENT.

NOTE. Other courses in the principles and methods of education in special subjects are offered in history, Latin, home economics, English, German, mathematics, pbysics, geography, natural science, oral reading, manual training, and art. For those courses the special circulars of the various departments may be consulted,

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II. THE DEPARTMENT OF POLITICAL ECONOMY

OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION JAMES LAURENCE LAUGHLIN, PH.D., Professor and Head of the Department of

Political Economy. LEON CARROLL MARSHALL, A.M., Associate Professor of Political Economy;

Dean of the College of Commerce and Administration. WILLIAM HILL, A.M., Associate Professor of the Economics of Agriculture. John CUMMINGS, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Political Economy. ROBERT FRANKLIN HOXIE, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Political Economy. CHESTER WHITNEY WRIGHT, Ph.D., Instructor in Political Economy. JAMES ALFRED FIELD, A.B., Instructor in Political Economy. TREVOR ARNETT, A.B., Lecturer on Accounting. JOHN CURTIS KENNEDY, A.B., Assistant in Political Economy. EDGAR HUTCHINSON JOHNSON, A.M., Assistant in Political Economy. John FRANKLIN EBERSOLE, A.M., Assistant in Political Economy. EZEKIEL HENRY DOWNEY, A.M., Assistant in Political Economy. EDIT: ABBOTT, Ph.D., Assistant Director Chicago School of Civics and

Philanthropy (Winter Quarter, 1910). MURRAY SHIPLEY WILDMAN, Ph.D., Professor of Economics, University of

Missouri (Summer Quarter, 1909).

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