Slike strani
PDF
ePub

THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES OF THE UNIVERSITY

OF CHICAGO

OFFICERS

MARTIN A. RYERSON, President
ANDREW MACLEI8A, Vice-President CHARLES L. HUTCHINSON, Treasurer

Thomas W. GOODSPEED, Secretary
WALLACE HECKMAN, Counsel and TREVOR ARNETT, Auditor

Business Manager

MEMBERS

Class 1. TERM EXPIRES IN 1909

FRED T. GATES
CHARLES L. HUTCHINSON

EDWARD GOODMAN
FRANCIS W. PARKER
FREDERICK A. SMITH

HOWARD G. GREY
ADOLPHUS C. BARTLETT

Class 2. TERM EXPIRES IN 1910 ELI B. FELSENTHAL

HAROLD F. McCORMICK HARRY P. JUDSON

MARTIN A. RYERSON
FRANKLIN MacVEAGH

WILLARD A. SMITH
FRANK O. LOWDEN

Class 3. TERM EXPIRES IN 1911 JESSE A. BalDWIN

THOMAS W. GOODSPEED Enos M. BARTON

David G. HAMILTON
THOMAS E. DONNELLEY

ANDREW MACLEISH
John D. ROCKEFELLER, JR.

HISTORICAL SKETCH OF THE UNIVERSITY OF

CHICAGO The first University of Chicago closed its work in 1886. Within a few months thereafter Mr. John D. Rockefeller took into consideration the founding of a new institution of learning in that city. In the fall of 1888 he conferred with Professor William R. Harper in regard to it, and finally entered into communication on the subject with Rev. F. T. Gates, Secretary of the American Baptist Education Society. In December, 1888, Mr. Gates brought the matter before the Board of the Society, which approved the effort to establish a well-equipped institution in Chicago, and instructed the Secretary to use every means in his power to originate and encourage such a movement. Being also encouraged by Mr. Rockefeller, Mr. Gates henceforth gave himself, with untiring devotion, to the work of founding the University of Chicago.

At the annual meeting of the Education Society, held in Boston in May, 1839, the Society formally resolved “to take immediate steps toward the found. ing of a well-equipped college in the City of Chicago.” To make it possible to carry out this purpose, Mr. Rockefeller at once made a subscription of $600,000 toward an endowment fund, conditioned on the pledging of $400,000 before June 1, 1890. This condition was fulfilled.

The annual meeting of the Education Society in June, 1890, was held in Chicago, and the Board of the Society adopted articles of incorporation and a charter for the new institution. On September 10 of the same year the University was incorporated with the following Trustees: E. Nelson Blake, Edward Goodman, Hermann H.Kohlsaat, George C. Walker, William R. Harper, Andrew McLeish, Martin A. Ryerson, Henry A. Rust, Alonzo K. Parker, Joseph M. Bailey, Charles C. Bowen, Charles L. Hutchinson, Frederick A. Smith, George A. Pillsbury, Ferdinand W. Peck, Daniel L. Shorey, Francis E. Hinckley, John W. Midgley, Eli B. Felsenthal, Elmer L. Corthell, Charles W. Needham.

The incorporators named in the charter were John D. Rockefeller, E. Nelson Blake, Marshall Field, Fred T. Gates, Francis E. Hinckley, and Thomas W. Goodspeed. The name of the corporation in law is “THE UNIVERSITY OF Chicago.” In recognition of the peculiar relation of Mr. Rockefeller to the institution, the Board of Trustees has enacted that on the seal, letter heads, and all official publications of the University the title shall read: "The University of Chicago, founded by John D. Rockefeller."

At the first meeting of the Board after its incorporation in September, 1890, Professor William Rainey Harper, of Yale University, was elected President; and he entered on the duties of his office July 1, 1891.

On July 11, 1891, the executors and trustees of the estate of William B. Ogden designated to the University 70 per cent. of that portion of the estate devoted by will to benevolent purposes. It is expected that more than half a million dollars will be realized from this designation for "The Ogden (Graduate) School of Science of the University of Chicago."

i For a detailed historical sketch of the University, see the President's Decennial Report, pp. 493-574.

The University began the erection of its first buildings on November 26, 1891. The doors of the University were opened to students and the work of instruction began October 1, 1892. The only buildings then ready for occupancy were Cobb Lecture Hall and the Graduate and Divinity dormitories.

Mr. Rockefeller's original contribution was soon followed by another of $1,000,000, which provided for the establishment of an academy at Morgan Park and the union of the Baptist Union Theological Seminary with the Uni. versity as its Divinity School. Other gifts followed, and on January 20, 1909, they had reached a total for all purposes of over $24,000,000.

December 14, 1895, Miss Helen Culver, of Chicago, presented to the University property valued at $1,000,000, “the whole gift to be devoted to the increase and spread of knowledge within the field of the biological sciences."

At the Convocation held March 19, 1901, the President announced that the Chicago Institute, founded by Mrs. Emmons Blaine, was to become a School of the University, to be known as the University of Chicago School of Education; that the South Side Academy was to become one of the secondary schools of the University, and that this school and the Chicago Manual Training School would be connected with the University School of Education, the two combined preparatory schools to be named the University High School.

University College, maintained from 1898 to 1906 through the generosity of Mrs. Emmons Blaine for the benefit of the teachers of Chicago, provides instruction at a central location in the city and also at Emmons Blaine Hall on the quadrangles.

With the beginning of the academic year 1901–2 the University instituted instruction in the first two years of a Medical Course. A Medical Faculty was appointed, and the Freshman and Sophomore classes of Rush Medical College were transferred to the University.

In the spring of 1902 the Board of Trustees determined on the organization of a Law School, the work of instruction to begin in October, 1902.

The annual enrolment of students in the College and Graduate classes has been as follows:

3,520 1893-4.

1901-2..

4,450 1,347

4,463 1,815

4,580 1,880

4,598 2,307

5,079 1898-9. 2,959

5,070 1899-0. 3,183

..5,1091 On January 10, 1906, the University suffered an incalculable loss in the death of President William Rainey Harper, who had served through fourteen and a half years. On the death of President Harper, Harry Pratt Judson was appointed Acting President of the University, and on February 20, 1907, he was elected President.

Following President Harper's death a fund exceeding $800,000 was contributed by twenty-two hundred subscribers for the building of the William Rainey Harper Memorial Library.

1 This includes 71 students regularly registered for credit in courses conducted by Univer. sity professors in the down-town district under the auspices of the Lecture-Study Department.

1892-3.

1900-1..

698 920

1894-5 1895-6. 1896-7. 1897-8.

1902-3.
1903-4....
1904-5.
1905-6.
1906–7.
1907-8

a

THE STATUTES OF THE UNIVERSITY

(Enacted by the Board of Trustees) 1. The University includes five Divisions: the Schools, Colleges, and Academies; the University Extension; the University Libraries, Laboratories, and Museums; the University Press; the University Affiliations.

2. The Schools, Colleges, and Academies include:

a) The Divinity School, the Graduate School of Arts and Literature, the Ogden (Graduate) School of Science, the School of Education, the Law School, already organized; the School of Medicine, partly organized; the School of Technology, the School of Fine Arts, and the School of Music, to be established.

b) The College of Arts, the College of Literature, the College of Philosophy, the College of Science, the College of Commerce and Administration, and University College. Each of these colleges (with respect to its work) is divided into a Junior College and a Senior College. The former includes the first half of the curriculum, ordinarily known as the work of the Freshman and Sophomore classes, and the latter the second half, ordinarily known as the work of the Junior and Senior classes.

c) The Academies of the University.

3. The University Extension Division includes the Lecture-Study Department, the Correspondence-Study Department, and the Library and Reading Department. It is the function of the University Extension Division to direct the work done by students who are unable to attend the daily exercises held at the University. This work is carried on through a separate faculty distinct from the University Faculty, and is directed by' a University board.

a) The University, through its Lecture-Study Department, arranges for lectures given by officers of the University in connection with other institutions and societies. The University encourages the organization of associations, chartered or unchartered, which, in co-operation with the University, undertake local educational work. Each instructor regularly doing lecturestudy work gives thirty-six weeks to instruction with an average of five lectures per week, singly or in series, together with the usual class work; provided that, so far as practicable, each instructor shall devote at least twelve of the thirty-six weeks to resident instruction.

6) The extramural work of the University is done through the Extension Division. The work is organized in five sections, namely, General Literature, Sacred Literature, Historical and Social Sciences, Physical and Biological Sciences, and Education. For each section there is a committee consisting of representatives of those actually engaged in the work of the section and appointed members of the staff of the University. The chairmen of the committees are appointed by the Trustees and co-operate with the secretaries in carrying out the educational policy of the work. The business management is conducted in four departments, namely, Lecture-Study, Correspondence

a

[ocr errors]

Study, Library and Reading, and Publication. For each of these depart. ments there is appointed a secretary who is especially responsible for the business side of the department. University visitors are appointed to develop the work of the Extension Division in special districts.

4. The University Libraries, Laboratories, and Museums include the General Library and all departmental libraries, the General Museum and all special museums, the Laboratories of the University, and the apparatus and materials used in the University.

5. The University Press includes the Manufacturing Department, the Publication Department, the Laboratory Supply Department, the Rotail Department, and the Mailing and Shipping Department.

6. The University Affiliations include the work done in connection with institutions which, although not forming an organic part of the University, have entered into the relationship of affiliation or co-operation with the University.

7. The President of the University is the executive head of the Univer. sity in all its departments, exercising such supervision and direction as will promote the efficiency of every department; he is responsible for the discipline of the University; he presides at the meetings of all Ruling Bodies of the University, and is the official medium of communication between the Facul. ties and the Board of Trustees, and between the students of the University and the Board of Trustees; he recommends to the Board of Trustees appointments to the several Faculties; he is responsible for carrying out all measures officially agreed upon by the Faculties in regard to matters committed to them by the Board, and such measures concerning the internal administration of the University as the Board of Trustees may enact. He makes an annual report to the Board of Trustees of the work and condition of the University in all its departments.

8. The University Chaplain, in co-operation with the President, the University Preacher, and other officers, studies and proposed methods of promot. ing the spiritual life of the University, and the harmony and efficiency of its religious and benevolent organizations; he also serves as needed in religious exercises and ministers as a pastor.

9. The University Recorder serves as secretary of the various Ruling Bodies of the University; has charge of the record of courses taken by each student and the rank attained in them, of diplomas, certificates of work, and letters of dismissal; and superintends the preparation of the University Record, of the Annual Register, and of other official publications.

10. The University Registrar matriculates students, collects all fees, fines, charges, and rents, due the University from students, conducts an exchange for the convenience of students and instructors, assigns rooms to students, and conducts a Bureau of Information at which visitors may obtain informa. tion concerning the University.

11. Deans.—The Divinity School, the Faculties of Arts, Literature, and Science, the Graduate School of Arts and Literature, the Ogden (Graduate) School of Science, the Law School, the School of Education, the Board of Medical Affairs, the Senior Colleges, the College of Commerce and Administration, the Junior Colleges, University College, and the Academies of the

« PrejšnjaNaprej »