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III. THE JUNIOR AND SENIOR COLLEGES. ADMISSION

§ 1. Time of Preparation-Admission Units.—Preparation for admission to a Junior College is expected to cover a period of four years in a secondary school (high school or academy) of high grade. Admission credits are reckoned in units. A unit is a course of study comprising not less than 150 hours of prepared work. Two hours of laboratory work are regarded as the equivalent of one hour of prepared work.

$ 2. Subjects Accepted for Admission and Their Unit Values.-The work accepted for admission is classified according to departments in the following list. Under each department the subjects for examination are numbered 1, 2, 3, etc. The numbers correspond in each case with those given under the several departments in the following table. The unit value of each subject is specified. For description of the ground covered by each of these units see § 7.

Civics, or Political Economy, Ye unit. (Only 12 unit may be offered.)

History 1, Greek, Yunit; History 2, Roman, y unit; History 3a, European, Mediaeval, %unit; History 36, European, Modern, Yunit; History 4a, United States, Elementary, Y2 unit; History 4b, United States, Advanced, 1 unit; History 5a, English, Elementary, Y unit; History 5b, English, Advanced, 1 unit. (Not more than 4 units may be offered.)

Greek 1, Elementary, 1 unit; Greek 2, Anabasis and Prose Composition, 1 unit; Greek 3, Homer, 1 unit.

Latin 1, Caesar, and Latin 2, Elementary Prose, together, 2 units; Latin 3, Virgil, 1 unit; Latin 4, Cicero, and Latin 5, Advanced Prose Composition, together, 1 unit.

French 1, 2, and 3, each 1 unit.
Spanish, 1 unit.
German, 1, 2, and 3, each 1 unit.
English, 3 units.
Biblical Aistory and Literature, %2 or 1 unit.

Mathematics la, Algebra to Quadratics, 1 unit; Mathematics 16, Algebra through Quadratics, Y2 unit; Mathematics 2, Plane Geometry, 1 unit; Mathematics 3, Solid Geometry, Y2 unit; Mathematics 4, Trigonometry, Y2 unit.

Astronomy, & unit.
Physics, 1 unit.
Chemistry, 1 unit.
Geology, Ye unit.
Physiography, K or 1 unit.
Zoology, Kor 1 unit.
Botany, 42 or 1 unit.
General Biology, 1 unit.
Physiology, % unit.
Freehand Drawing, Y or 1 unit.
Mechanical Drawing, Y2 or 1 unit.
Shopwork, 1 or 2 units.

$ 3. Amount of Work.-A candidate is admitted on the presentation of 15 units from the list of approved subjects ($ 2).

§ 4. Specific Subjects.-Of the 15 units presented for admission, 3 units must be English; 3 units, language other than English; and 24 units, Mathematics la, 16, and 2. One additional unit of language other than English is required of a student who enters the College of Literature.

a § 5. Limitations.—(1) Not more than one unit each of United States History and of English History will be accepted. (2) Not more than 4 units in Science will be accepted. (3) Not less than 2 units of Latin will be accepted. (4) Not more than two units in all for both Drawing and Shop-work will be credited for admission. (5) College credit for work done in a high school or academy in excess of the 15 units and of the amount required for graduation from the school will be granted only on the following terms: (a) On presentation of a certificate of an amount of work equivalent in quantity and kind to that required in the corresponding course in the Junior College; (b) on completing two quarters' work in the University with creditable standing and (c) on passing an examination at the University before the close of the fourth quarter of residence.'

§ 6. Advised Grouping of Preparatory Subjects.—(1) A student who wishes to enter the College of Arts is advised to present, besides the required English and Mathematics, 4 units of Latin and 3 units of Greek. (2) A student who wishes to enter the College of Literature or the College of Philosophy is advised to present, besides the required English and Mathematics, 5 units of Latin, French, or German, and 2 units of History. (3) A student who wishes to enter the College of Science is advised to present, besides the required English, 3 units of Mathematics, 4 units of Latin, French, or German, and 2 units of Science.

NOTEs. - (a) While Latin is not required for admission to the Colleges of Literature, of Philosophy, and of Commerce and Administration, or for graduation from them, all stadents entering these colleges are advised to take Latin; and students who expect to do advanced work or to teach in Political Economy, Political Science, History, Sociology, French, German, or English, or who expect to enter the Divinity School, or the Law School, are advised to take at least 3 units of Latin. Latin is required for admission to the Divinity School, and is a prorequisite for graduate work in any of the departments mentioned.

(6) Students who intend to study Medicine are advised to present for admission 2 units of Latin, 3 units of French or German, 1 unit each of Physics and Chemistry, 3 units of Mathematics (including 4 unit of Trigonometry). All of these subjects are included in the requirements for admission to the courses in Medicine.

$7. Description of Subjects Accepted for Admission.—The scope of the subjects accepted for admission is indicated in the pages which follow. The numbers in each department correspond with those in the tables above.

POLITICAL ECONOMY Some standard text, such as Laughlin's Elements of Political Economy, should be used as the basis of work and of classroom discussion. Students should have access also to selected economic treatises, and should be encouraged in connection with class work systematically to extend their research into local conditions of industry and agriculture. ¥unit.

POLITICAL SCIENCE

Civil Government.-Credit will be given for such knowledge of this sub. ject as is indicated by any standard text-such as Hart, Hinsdale, or James

1 These conditions do not apply to English in advance of the required 3 units.

and Sanford. The student should not be confined to one book, however, but should be accustomed to work by topics. *2 unit.

HISTORY

1) The History of Greece from earliest times to the fall of Corinth (146 B. C.), together with a preliminary survey of ancient Oriental history. Y unit.

2) The History of Rome from earliest times to the death of Constantine (337 A. D.), with especial emphasis upon the Republic of the first century B. C., and the history of the Empire. 12 unit.

Recommended texts: Goodspeed's History of the Ancient World; Botsford's History of Greece and History of Rome; or Botsford's Ancient History; West's Ancient History; Oman's History of Greece; Morey's History of Rome; Morey's History of Greece; Myer's Ancient History (revised edition, 1904); Abbott's Short History of Rome.

3) General European History.-(a) The work in General European History is to begin with a study of the institutions of the Roman Empire under Diocletian and Constantine. (b) The following texts are recommended: for the Mediaeval Period, Thatcher and Schevill's The Middle Ages (new edition); for the Modern Period, Schevill's History of Modern Europe; or Robinson's History of Europe, entire; Adams' General European History; Bourne's European History. 1 unit, or 42 unit for 3a or 3b separately.

4) The History of the United States, elementary.-(a) More attention should be given to the period subsequent to the Declaration of Independence than to that preceding. So far as possible, the use of books other than the textbook should be encouraged. Fiske's, McMaster's, Thomas', or Johnston's school texts are recommended. 42 unit. (6) The History of the United States, advanced.—This requires more detailed study than the preceding. 4a is included in 4b, and separate credit will not be given for 4a if the student takes 46. Recommended texts: Channing's Students' History of the United States, McLaughlin's History of the American Nation, and Epochs of American History (3 vols.), edited by A. B. Hart. 1 unit.

5) The History of England, elementary.-(a) The student should know the main facts connected with the development of the English people. Recommended texts: Coman and Kendall's The Growth of the English Nation, Larned's History of England, Cheyney's History of England, or Tout and Sullivan's Elementary English History. *2 unit. (b) The History of England, advanced. This requires more detailed study than the preceding. 5a is included in 5b, and separate credit will not be given for 5a if the student takes 56. Recommended texts: Terry's History of England, Gardiner's Student's History of England, or Ransome's History of England. 1 unit.

GREEK

1) Greek grammar, and the translation into Greek of sentences of average difficulty. 1 unit. Required of candidates for the College of Arts.

2) The translation of a passage from Xenophon's Anabasis, either at sight or from Books I to IV, and the translation into Greek of sentences of average difficulty based upon the Anabasis, with grammatical, literary, geographical, and historical questions. 1 unit. Required of candidates for the College of Arts.

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To satisfy the requirement of 1) and 2) four books of the Anabasis should be read, with frequent exercises in composition.

3) The translation of an average passage from the Iliad of Homer, either at sight or from Books I to VI, with questions on Homeric grammar and prosody. 1 unit.

This unit is recommended to candidates for the College of Arts. The candidate is expected to have read at least six books of the Iliad. If only a hall-unit is offered, an extra major-one of the elective courses—will be required in college. It is possible, however, for students who seek the degree of Bachelor of Arts who are admitted without Greek to take the preparatory courses in college; see Annual Register, Department of Greek.

LATIN

1) The translation at sight of narrative prose similar to that of Caesar.

2) The translation into Latin of sentences of average difficulty based upon Caesar's Gallic War. 1) and 2), together, 2 units.

3) The translation at sight of an average passage from Virgil or Ovid, with questions on poetical forms and constructions and on prosody. 1 unit.

4) The translation at sight of a piece of prose equal in difficulty to an average passage of Cicero's speeches or letters, with grammatical, literary, and biographical questions.

5) The translation into Ciceronian Latin of a connected passage of idiomatic English. 4) and 5), together, 1 unit.

NOTE.-Whilo Latin is not required for admission to the Colleges of Literature and of Commerce and Administration, or graduation from them, all students entering these Colleges are advised to take Latin; and students who expect to do advanced work or to teach in Political Economy, Political Science, History, Sociology, French, German, or English, or who expect to enter the Divinity School, or the Law School, are advised to take at least 3 units in Latin. Latin is required for admission to the Divinity School, as well as to the course in Medicine, and is a prerequisite for graduato work in any of the departments mentioned.

FRENCH

1) The first unit of French should comprise: (a) The rudiments of grammar, including the inflection of the regular and the more common irregular verbs; the plural of nouns; the inflection of adjectives, participles, and pronouns; the use of personal pronouns, common adverbs, prepositions, and con. junctions; the order of words in the sentence, and the elementary rules of syntax. (6) The reading of not less than 200 duodecimo pages of graduated texts, with constant practice in translating into French easy variations of the sentences road (the teacher giving the English) and in reproducing from memory sentences previously read. (c) Careful drill in pronunciation; writing French from dictation; conversation.

This unit is recommended to all applicants for admission to the Colleges of Literature, of Science, and of Philosophy. Either this unit, or the first unit of German, is recommended to applicants for admission to the College of Arts.

2) The second unit of French should comprise: (a) Continued drill upon the rudiments of grammar, with constant application in the construction of sentences; mastery of the forms and use of pronouns, pronominal adjectives, and all irregular verb forms, and of the simpler uses of the conditional and subjunctive. ,(6) The reading of not less than 400 pages of easy modern prose in the form of stories, plays, or historical or biographical sketches; constant practice in translating into French easy variations upon the texts read; frequent abstracts, sometimes oral and sometimes written, of the text. (c) Continued drill in pronunciation, conversation, and dictation.

Suitable texts for the second unit are: Colomba (Mérimée); Jeanne d'Arc (Lamartine); Le roi des montagnes (A bout); Le tour de la France (Bruno); Daudet's stories; Contes biographiques (Foa); Le petit Robinson de Paris (Foa); La poudre aux yeux (Labiche et Martin); Le voyage de M. Perrichon (Labiche et Martin); La cigale chez les fourmis (Legouvé et Labiche); Sans famille (Malot); La tache du petit Pierre (Mairet); Le siège de Paris (Sarcey); La mare au diable (Sand); extracts from Michelet, stories of EckmannChatrain, Verne, etc.

French 2) or a second unit of German is recommended to applicants for admission to the Colleges of Literature, of Science, and of Philosophy.

3) The third unit of French calls for the ability to use the language effectively as a means of oral and written expression. The work should comprise: (a) The study of a grammar of moderate completeness. (6) The reading of not less than 600 pages of French of ordinary difficulty, a portion to be in the dramatic form. (c) Constant practice in giving French paraphrases, abstracts, or reproductions from memory of selected portions of the matter read; writing from dictation; conversation.

Suitable texts for the third unit are: About's stories; Augier and San. deau's Le gendre de M. Poirier; Béranger's poems; Corneille's Le Cid and Horace; Coppée's poems; La Brète's Mon oncle et mon curé; Madame de Sévigné's letters; Victor Hugo's Hernani and Ruy Blas; Labiche's plays; Loti's Pêcheur d'Islande; Molière's L'avare and Le bourgeois gentilhomme; Racine’s Athalie, Andromaque, and Esther; Sandeau's Mademoiselle de la Seiglière; Scribe's plays: Thierry's Récits des temps mérovingiens; Thiers' L'expédition de Bonaparte en Egypte; Vigny's La canne de jonc; Voltaire's historical writings, etc.

This unit is recommended to candidates for the Colleges of Literature, of Science, and of Commerce and Administration.

SPANISH

This unit should comprise: (a) Drill in pronunciation, including accentuation. (6) The elements of grammar, including all the regular and the more common irregular verbs, the forms and order of the personal pronouns, the uses and meaning of the common prepositions, adverbs, and conjunctions, the use of the personal accusative, and other elementary rules of syntax. (c) Study of not less than 175 pages of graded prose texts. 1 unit.

GERMAN

1) This first unit should comprise : (a) Careful drill upon pronunciation. (6) Systematic drill upon the elements of grammar, including the inflection of the articles, the noun, the adjective, the propoun, the verb, strong and weak; also upon the use of the common prepositions, the simpler use of the modal auxiliaries and elementary rules of syntax and word-order ; (c) The reading of from 100 to 150 pages of easy texts, chiefly modern prose, with especial stress laid upon acquiring a good working vocabulary; (d) Abundant prac

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