The Works of Spenser: In Six Volumes. With a Glossary Explaining the Old and Obscure Words. To which is Prefix'd the Life of the Author, and an Essay on Allegorical Poetry, by Mr. Hughes. ...

Sprednja platnica
J. and R. Tonson and S. Draper, 1750
 

Izbrane strani

Druge izdaje - Prikaži vse

Pogosti izrazi in povedi

Priljubljeni odlomki

Stran 154 - Out of every corner of the woods and glens they came creeping forth upon their hands, for their legs could not bear them ; they looked like anatomies of death, they spake like ghosts crying out of their graves...
Stran 126 - ... to their lovers; that his music was not the harp nor lays of love, but the cries of people and clashing of armour; and finally, that he died not bewailed of many, but made many wail when he died, that dearly bought his death.
Stran 104 - Iren. Because the commodity doth not countervail the discommodity; for the inconveniences which thereby do arise are much more many; for it is a fit house for an outlaw, a meet bed for a rebel, and an apt cloak for a thief.
Stran 125 - ... seldom use to choose unto themselves the doings of good men for the arguments of their poems, but whomsoever they find to be most licentious of life, most bold and lawless in his doings, most dangerous and desperate in all parts of disobedience and rebellious disposition; him they set up and glorify in their rithmes, him they praise to the people, and to young men make an example to follow.
Stran 104 - When it raineth, it is his penthouse; when it bloweth, it is his tent; when it freezeth, it is his tabernacle. In summer he can wear it loose; in winter he can wrap it close; at all times he can use it; never heavy, never cumbersome.
Stran 20 - one and th ' other in his deeper skill. O griefe of griefes! O gall of all good hearts! To see that vertue should dispised bee Of him that first was raisde for vertuous parts, And now, broad spreading like an aged tree, Lets none shoot up, that nigh him planted bee.
Stran 126 - ... that he was none of the idle milk-sops that was brought up by the fire-side, but that most of his days he spent in arms and valiant enterprises ; that he did never eat his meat before he had won it with his sword...
Stran 126 - ... that the day was his night, and the night his day, that he loved not to be long wooing of wenches to yield to him, but where he came, he took by force the spoil of other men's love, and left but...
Stran 126 - ... under his mantle, but used commonly to keep others waking to defend their lives, and did light his candle at the flames of their houses to lead him in the darkness; that the day was his night, and the night his day...
Stran 154 - ... although there should none of them fall by the sword nor be slain by the soldier : yet thus being kept from manurance and their cattle from running abroad, by this hard restraint they would quickly consume themselves, and devour one another.

Bibliografski podatki