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53A. The History of Antiquity. Assistant Professor FERGUSON. The purpose of this course is twofold, to present the salient features

of ancient life to students of history, and to furnish an histori

cal perspective to students of the ancient literatures. 3 hrs., throughout the year. MW F, 3. 63. Modern European History. (G.E.)

Professor STEPHENS and Mr. LANDFIELD. Lectures on the History of Europe from 1600 to 1815, based on

Stephens' Syllabus of a Course of Lectures on European History. 3 hrs., throughout the year. M Tu W, 3. Prerequisite: Course

52, as given in 1902–03, and a reading knowledge of French or German. After 1903–04, Course 64 will also be a prerequisite.

64. History of the Middle Ages. Assistant Professor LAPSLEY. A general survey of the history of Western Europe from the

establishment of the Roman Principate to the beginning of the

Reformation Movement. This course is intended for such Freshmen and Sophomores as

wish to obtain a general acquaintance with Medieval History, as well as for those who mean to proceed with the study of the Middle Ages in Courses 65 and 66, for which this is a pre

requisite. No text-book is used. Instruction will be by lectures and discussion

based on the topical reading assigned from time to time. 3 hrs., throughout the year. M W F, 2. 105. Early Hebrew History: Genesis to Judges. Dr. VAN KIRK. A sketch of the origins of the Hebrew People, with emphasis on

their religious ideas and an intelligent reading of the English

version of the early portions of the Old Testament. 2 hrs., first half-year. Tu Th, 10. Open to all students. 106. Hebrew History: Saul and David to the Exile.

Dr. VAN KIRK. A continuation of Course 105 with emphasis on the historical set

ting of the Prophets of Israel. 2 hrs., second half-year. Tu Th, 10. Open to all students. 55. Latin-American Colonization. (G.E.) Professor MOSES. Spanish settlement and administration during the Colonial Period;

the War of Independence; the political development of the

Spanish-American Republics. 3 hrs., second half-year. Prerequisite: Any two courses.

*56. The French Revolution.

Professor BACON. The history of Europe from 1789 to 1815. 3 hrs., first half-year. MW F, 10. Prerequisite: Any one of the

courses open to Freshmen.

Mr. LANDFIELD.

57. Europe in the Nineteenth Century.

The history of Europe from 1815.
3 hrs., second half-year. MWF, 10.

*59. Constitutional History of England to 1485. (G.E.)

Assistant Professor LAPSLEY. A detailed study of the origin and growth of the Constitution and

the principles of public law in England. Instruction will be by lectures, the translation and discussion of original authorities, a considerable amount of topical reading, and the preparation of two essays by each student. Every member of the class will

provide himself with a copy of Stubbs's Select Charters. This course is designed to be helpful to those who mean to study

Law as well as to students of Constitutional History. 3 hrs., throughout the year. MWF, 2. Prerequisite: Courses

la and 52.

*60. Constitutional History of England since 1485. (G.E.)

Professor STEPHENS. A detailed study of the development of constitutional government

in England from the end of the Middle Ages to the present time. 3 hrs., throughout the year. MWF, 2. Prerequisite: Course 59. 61. Greek Institutions. (G.E.) Assistant Professor FERGUSON. The origin and working of the mechanism of government in typical

oligarchic, democratic, federal, and monarchic states. Inter

national relations. The Greek theory of government. 3 hrs., first half-year. MWF, 1. Prerequisite: Courses 53 and 54

(as hitherto given) and a reading knowledge of Greek and

French, or German. 62A. Constitutional History of Rome. (G.E.)

Assistant Professor FERGUSON. In this course problems will be discussed in connection with the

tribal kingship, the patrician aristocracy, the growth of constitutional government, the senate, the organization of Italy, the administration of the provinces, the programs of reform and revolution, the dyarchy, and the development of despotism.

* Not to be given in 1903-04.

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3 hrs., second half-year. MWF, 1. Prerequisite: Courses 53,

and 54 as hitherto given, and a reading knowledge of Latin,

and French, or German. *65. Germany in the Middle Ages. (G.E.)

Assistant Professor LAPSLEY. A study of its institutions, with critical examination of the

origin, organization, and influence of the Holy Roman Empire. 2 hrs., throughout the year. Prerequisite: Course 64, an ability

to use Latin and German texts, and the consent of the instructor. *66. The Foundations of the French Monarchy. (G.E.)

Assistant Professor LAPSLEY. A study of the growth of the French Nation from the close of the

tenth until the beginning of the sixteenth century. This will include the study of institutions both central and local as well as

the political history of the period. 2 hrs., throughout the year, M W F, 9. Prerequisite: Course 64,

an ability to use Latin and French texts, and the consent of the

instructor. 68A. Eastern Europe. (G.E.)

Mr. LANDFIELD. A study of the rise and development of Russia, and its relations

with other nations in Europe and Asia. 3 hrs., first half-year. MWF, 10. Prerequisite: The consent of

the instructor. 171. History of the United States since 1850. (G.E.)

Assistant Professor BABCOCK. A study of the overthrow of the slave power, the civil war, recon

struction, and the development of the resources of the country. 3 hrs., first half-year. Prerequisite: Course 72 or 73 and two

other courses. 72. English Colonies in America. Assistant Professor BABCOCK. A detailed study of Colonial institutions and progress to the forma

tion of the Constitution. 3 hrs., first half-year. M W F, 2. Prerequisite: One course in

history. 73. The United States under the Constitution, 1783–1850.

Assistant Professor BABCOCK. Special emphasis is laid on the constitutional and social develop3 hrs., second half-year. M W F, 2. Prerequisite: Two courses

ment.

* This course will be given, if a sufficient number of qualified students apply. † Not given in 1903-04.

in history and at least Sophomore standing.

80. Territorial Expansion of the United States. (G.E.)

Professor MOSES. The settlement and political organization of Louisiana, Florida,

Texas, and the region west of the Rocky Mountains, with a view to the events leading up to the several territorial accessions

to the United States since 1783. 2 hrs., second half-year. Prerequisite: Course 72 or 73.

86. Diplomatic History of the United States. (G.E.)

Assistant Professor BABCOCK. A study of the negotiations, treaties, arbitrations, and congresses

in which the United States has been a party, 1776–1890. 3 hrs., first half-year. MWF, 1. Prerequisite: Any four courses,

including Course 71 or 73.

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*86. The Renaissance and Reformation.

Professor BACON. The transition from medieval to modern history, 3 hrs., second half-year. M W F, 10. . Prerequisite: Any five

courses.

*102. The Art and Meaning of History. (G.E.) Professor Bacon. A review of the progress of historical writing from the earliest

times to the present; with an examination of the various attempts to interpret the deeper meanings of history, com

monly called the philosophy of history. 2 hrs., first half-year. Tu Th, 9. Prerequisite: Twenty units in

History and Political Science. (Courses in Jurisprudence may be substituted in part for the prerequisite.)

103. History of California. (G.E.) Assistant Professor BABCOCK. A discussion of the salient features of the settlement, conquest,

and development of the State of California, with a critical examination of some of the sources. The special emphasis for

the year 1903-04 will be on the period from 1848 to 1880. 2 hrs., second half-year. Tu Th, 11. Prerequisite: Three courses

in History, including 71, 72, or 73, and the consent of the instructor.

*Not to be given in 1903-04.

104. The Teaching of History. (G.E.)

Assistant Professor BABCOCK. A discussion of the teaching of history in secondary schools, with special emphasis on the methods and materials.

The course is designed primarily for seniors expecting to apply for a high

school teacher's certificate in history. 1 hr., second half-year. S, 9. Prerequisite: Six courses, and at

least senior standing.

109. Jewish History.

Dr. VAN KIRK. A survey of the Jewish People from the Restoration to the Fall of

Jerusalem 70 A.D., with a view to showing the historical back

ground of Christianity. 2 hrs., first half-year. Tu Th, 11. Prerequisite: Course 106, or

at least Junior standing.

110. Early Christian History.

Dr. Van KIRK. A sketch of the origins of Christianity and a history of the Apostolic

Age up to the beginnings of Church History proper. 2 hrs., second-half year. Tu Th, 11. Prerequisite: Courses 106

and 107 or at least Senior standing. *82. Greek Epigraphy. .

Assistant Professor FERGUSON. The history of the Greek alphabet and the interpretation of the

more important inscriptions of the Hellenistic period. 2 hrs., first half-year. Text-book: Dittenberger's Sylloge Inscrip

tionum Græcarum. Primarily for Graduates. 92. Investigation Course in the History of the United States.

Assistant Professor BABCOCK. A course in original research upon assigned topics, with weekly

conferences with individual students. 2 hrs., throughout the year. Primarily for Graduates. *93. History of the Christian Church.

Professor BACON. The spread of Christianity, and the doctrine and polity of the

Church. 2 hrs., throughout the year. Primarily for Graduates. *94. History of Eastern Christendom.

Professor BACON. A critical study of the political, social, and religious institutions

of the Eastern Christian nations. 2 hrs., throughout the year.

* Not to be given in 1903-04.

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