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ANTHROPOLOGY.

John C. MERRIAM, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Palæontology and

Historical Geology.
GEORGE A. REISNER, Ph.D., Hearst Lecturer in Egyptology.
Max UHLE, Ph.D., Hearst Lecturer in Peruvian Archæology.
ALFRED L. KROEBER, Ph.D., Instructor in Anthropology.
PLINY E. GODDARD, M.A., Instructor in Anthropology.

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The Department of Anthropology was instituted in 1900 in order to organize and coördinate the numerous archæological and ethnological researches supported in behalf of the University by of Mrs. Phoebe A. Hearst.

The Department is under the direction of an Executive Committee, of which Dr. Frederick W. Putnam, Peabody Professor of American Archæology and Ethnology and Curator of the Peabody Museum of Harvard University, and Curator of the Department of Anthropology in the American Museum of Natural History of New York, is Chair

The other members are Dr. John C. Merriam, Assistant Professor of Palæontology and Historical Geology, Secretary of the Committee; President Wheeler; and Mrs. Hearst.

While the Department is devoted primarily to research, the following courses of instruction are offered. In addition, public lectures on anthropological subjects will from time to time be given.

Of the ethnological courses offered, 2 and 5 are general courses, introductory to the subject. Course 1 is open only to students who evince special fitness or preparation. It is intended as preparation for special research work in ethnology.

Of the linguistic courses, 3 is parallel to 1. It is open to students either of anthropological or of general linguistic interests and training.

1. North American Ethnology.

Dr. KROEBER. A detailed examination, based on considerable reading, of several

distinctive types of North American cultures-Eskimo, Plains, Pueblo, and North Pacific Coast. Prospective students should

consult the instructor before electing the course. 2 hrs., first half-year. Hours to be arranged.

ANN'M'T-3

2. Tribes of Northwestern California.

Mr. GODDARD. A course of lectures on the arts, manner of life, and social customs

of the Hupa culture area, followed by an examination of the myths of the region. The abundant material in the Museum

will be used for illustration. 1 hr., second half-year.

3. North American Languages.

Dr. KROEBER. A detailed examination, based on texts, of several characteristic

North American languages. Prospective students should con

sult the instructor before electing the course. 2 hrs., first half-year. Hours to be arranged.

4. Geological History of Man. Assistant Professor MERRIAM.

1 hr., second half-year. Tu, 1. Prerequisite: Geology 5 or 1B.

5. The Indians of California.

Dr. KROEBER.
A course of lectures on the characteristics and history of the

Indians of California, introduced by an account of the North
American Indians in general. Museum material will be used in

illustration.
1 hr., first half-year. Tu, 11.
6. Experimental Phonetics.

Mr. GODDARD. A laboratory course, consisting of dissections of the vocal organs

of lower animals, an examination of prepared dissections of the human throat, experiments in the physics of sound, and a study of the elementary sounds composing human speech by means of

the Rousselot apparatus. Course for special research. 4 hrs., second half-year; 2 units.

LINGUISTICS.

BENJ. IDE WHEELER, Ph.D., LL.D., President of the University. Hugo K. SCHILLING, Ph.D., Professor of the German Language and

Literature.

ALEXIS F. LANGE, Ph.D., Professor of English and Scandinavian

Philology. Max L. MARGOLIS, Ph.D., Associate Professor of the Semitic Lan

guages. GEORGE R. NoYES, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of English and Slavic

Philology. CHARLES H. HOWARD, M.A., Instructor in French. GUSTAVE FAUCHEUX, Bachelier ès Lettres, Bachelier ès Sciences,

Instructor in French.

HERBERT C. NUTTING, Ph.D., Instructor in Latin.
ALFRED L. KROEBER, Ph.D., Instructor in Anthropology.

1. General Introduction to the Science of Language. (G.E.)

Dr. WHEELER. The essential principles of the life and growth of language; out

lines of the science of Phonetics; history of the science of comparative philology; historical and ethnological results of the science; classification of languages; salient characteristics of the various branches of the Indo-European family of lan

guages; methods of investigation. A course intended for prospective teachers of languages. May be

counted as Group Elective in any language. 2 hrs., first half-year. Tu Th, 9. Open to Seniors and Graduates.

2. Indo-European Comparative Grammar. (G.E.) Dr. WHEELER.

With special reference to the Germanic, Greek and Latin languages. A course intended for prospective teachers of languages. May be

counted as Group Elective in any language. 2 hrs., second half-year. Tu Th, 9. Open to Seniors and Graduates.

*3. The Relationship of the Indo-European, Semitic, and Egyptian Families of Languages. (G.E.)

Associate Professor MARGOLIS. The criteria of the affinity of languages. Agglutinative inflection:

the structure of the Indo-European languages. Internal inflection: the structure of the Semitic languages. The Egyptian language. The three groups compared in regard to grammar,

phonetic development, and vocabulary. 1 hr., throughout the year. Tu, 4. Primarily for Graduates. Knowl

edge of a Semitic language is not required. Familiarity with one classical language is essential.

*5. Fundamental Problems of Linguistics.

Associate Professor MARGOLIS. On the basis of Delbrück's "Grundfragen der Sprachforschung"

interpretation of selected chapters from the works of Humboldt, Steinthal, Geiger, Wegener, von der Gabelentz, Jespersen, Paul,

Wundt, Mauthner. 1 hr., throughout the year. Th, 3. Primarily for Graduates.

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Dr. NUTTING.

4. Elementary Sanskrit.

Perry's Primer, and Lanman's Reader. 2 hrs., throughout the year. M W, 11.

North American Languages. [See Anthropology 3.] Dr. KROEBER.

Old English. [See English 11a.]

Professor LANGE and Assistant Professor NoYES.

Modern English Phonology. (A.) [See English 14A.]

Professor LANGE.

*Old Norse. [See English 30.]

Professor LANGE.

Historical Grammar of the German Language: Middle High German and Modern German.. (G.E.) [See German 12.]

Professor SCHILLING.

*Introduction to Germanic Philology. [See German 13B.]

Professor SCHILLING.

Historical Phonetics. [See French 10.]

Mr. HOWARD.

Seminar: Linguistic. [See French 27.]

Mr. FAUCHEUX.

*Not to be given in 1903-04.

SEMITIC LANGUAGES.

JACOB VOORSANGER, D.D., Professor of the Semitic Languages and

Literatures. Max L. MARGOLIS, Ph.D., Associate Professor of the Semitic Lan

guages.

Students intending to prepare themselves for the ministry or otherwise interested in the work offered by the department are advised, on the basis of a good knowledge of the classical and modern languages, to take in their Junior year Courses 1, 3, 7A, 20 and in their Senior year Courses 4 or 60, 6B and 10, or 11, or 13. The graduate work provides for a study of the remaining Semitic dialects and for research along the lines of Semitic philology.

SEMITIC LANGUAGES IN GENERAL. *1. General Introduction to the Study of the Semitic Languages. (G.E.)

Associate Professor MARGOLIS. Lectures on the nature and classification of the Semitic languages,

and a general survey of the history and literature of the

Semites. 1 hr., throughout the year. Tu, 3. Open to Juniors. *The Relationship of the Indo-European, Semitic, and Egyptian Families of Languages. (G.E.) [See Linguistics 3.]

Associate Professor MARGOLIS. 23. Semitic Seminar.

Associate Professor MARGOLIS. Subject for 1903–04. Recent Discussions of Biblical Problems. 2 hrs., throughout the year. M, 4-6. For Graduates. Prerequisite:

Courses 1, 3, 4 or 6c, and a knowledge of the classical and modern languages.

COURSES IN BIBLICAL HEBREW. OLD TESTAMENT EXEGESIS

AND HISTORY. *3. Hebrew. (G.E.)

Associate Professor MARGOLIS. First Course: Grammatical interpretation of the Book of Ruth,

preceded by an outline of Hebrew accidence. Text-books: Hebrew Bible, ed. Hahn; Gesenius's Hebrew Lexicon, ed. Brown-Briggs-Driver.

* Not to be given in 1903-04.

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