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4. General Physics.

Professor SLATE. Lectures with experimental illustration and recitations on topics in

heat, light, sound and electricity; giving prominence to subjects which are of importance as connected with the growth and the

present condition of the science. 3 hrs., throughout the year. Tu Th, 11, and S, 9. Prerequisite:

At least full Sophomore standing. The attention paid to methods of presentation makes this a profitable course for

prospective teachers of elementary physics. 5. Analytic Mechanics. (G.E.)

Professor SLATE and Assistant Professor RAYMOND. The mathematical treatment of the important principles of dynamics

and statics, fully illustrated by problems and applications. 4 hrs., throughout the year. Two sections. M Tu Th F, 8. Pre

requisite: Course 9 or 3B in Mathematics. Prescribed, Junior year, in the Colleges of Engineering.

6. Harmonic Motion. (G.E.) Assistant Professor RAYMOND. The analytical treatment of wave-motion, with application to

sound, light, and electricity. Lectures. 2 hrs., second half-year. Tu Th, 10. Prerequisite: Course 5,

first half-year, and Course 21 or 4. This course forms an alternative continuation of Course 5 in the second half-year.

7. Absolute Electrical Measurements. (G.E.)

Assistant Professor RAYMOND. One lecture and two laboratory exercises a week. 7 hrs., second half-year; 3 units. Lecture, W, 8. Laboratory,

Section I, Tu Th, 1-4; II, MF, 1-4. Prerequisite: Course 5, first half-year, and Courses 1, 2, 3, and 10. This course forms an alternative continuation of Course 5 in the second half-y

-year. Elective, Junior year, in the College of Mechanics.

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8. Theory of Light. (G.E.)

Dr. E. E. HALL. Lectures, with experimental illustration. Problems relating to

the theory of optical instruments, treated by the methods of

geometrical optics and the wave-theory. 2 hrs., throughout the year, but may be taken for the first half

year only. Tu Th, 11. Prerequisite: Course 2A or 4 in Physics; Course 9 or 3B in Mathematics. Students are strongly recom mended to accompany this course with special laboratory work under Course 18.

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9a. Molecular Physics.

Mr. KRATS. A descriptive study of the gaseous, liquid and solid states of

matter. Supplementary to Course 2A, especially to work of

Section I, and intermediate between Course 2a and Course 12. 2 hrs., first half-year. Prerequisite: Course 2A in Physics and

Course 9 or 3B in Mathematics. 10. Electricity. (G.E.)

Assistant Professor RAYMOND. Elements of the mathematical theory of electricity and magnetism,

with some of the more important applications. Lectures. 2 hrs., first half-year. Tu Th, 10. Prerequisite: Course 2a or 4

in Physics; Course 9 or 3B in Mathematics. Elective, Junior

year, in the College of Mechanics. 119. Electric Discharges through Gases. (G.E.)

Associate Professor LEWIS. Lectures, experimentally illustrated, on phenomena of the arc

spark, and vacuum-tube; and on Cathode rays, Röntgen rays,

and Becquerel rays. 2 hrs., first half-year. Prerequisite: Course 24 or 4. This course

is recommended as preliminary to Course 11. 11. Spectroscopy. (G.E.)

Associate Professor LEWIS. Lectures, with experimental illustration, on methods and results

of investigation, and spectroscopic theories. 2 hrs., second half-year. MW, 11. Prerequisite: Course 8.

Course 11a also will be found helpful. 12. Theory of Heat and Thermodynamics. (G.E.) Dr. BURGESS.

Lectures twice a week; for Juniors and Seniors.

2 hrs., first half-year. 12A. Energetics. (G.E.)

Dr. BURGESS. A continuation of Course 12, with applications to chemical and

physical problems. 2 hrs., second half-year. 128. Heat Measurements. (G.E.)*

Dr. BURGESS. Thermometry, Calorimetry, Pyrometry and general heat measure

ments, adapted for Chemists, Engineers and Physicists. One

lecture and one laboratory exercise a week. 4 hrs., first or second half-year: 2 units. 13. Physical Optics. (G.E.) Assistant Professor RAYMOND.

Laboratory exercises twice a week.
* May be chosen as advanced work by special arrangement only.

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14. Advanced Physical Measurement. (G.E.)

Assistant Professor RAYMOND. Problems involving accurate measurement and mathematical work.

Laboratory exercises twice a week. 6 hrs., first half-year; 3 units, Tu Th, 1-4. Elective, Senior

year, in the College of Mechanics.

15. Dynamics of Rotation. (G.E.)

Professor SLATE. Theory of the gyroscope, including precession and nutation. 3 hrs., second half-year, in two successive years, beginning Jan

uary, 1903. Prerequisite: Course 5. Primarily for Graduates. 16. Special Advanced Study and Research. (G.E.)

Associate Professor LEWIS and Assistant Professor RAYMOND. Laboratory work throughout the year, on problems assigned

according to the preparation and needs of individual students.

Credit value to be fixed in each case. Primarily for Graduates. 17. Readings and Discussions. (G.E.)

Professor SLATE. Work throughout the year, for Seniors and Graduate Students,

upon topics selected by special arrangement. The following have been treated during the period 1896–1902; recent advances in the theory of electrolysis; the development of the doctrine of conservation of energy; mathematical theory of electricity; theory of double refraction and polarization; electro-magnetic

theory of light. 2 hrs., throughout the year. Primarily for Graduates. 18. Special Undergraduate Study. (G.E.)*

Associate Professor LEWIS and Assistant Professor RAYMOND. All special laboratory work not included in courses announced

above. Credit value to be fixed in each case. Students electing Course 18 are urged, as far as possible, to confine the work to the first half-year. On account of limited room and apparatus during the second half-year, it may be necessary to restrict the number of students to those electing the course for the entire year.

*

Mr. Kraus will offer during the first half-year a course in laboratory manipulations, consisting mainly of glass working. Admission to this course is by special arrangement with the instructor. No Universiiy credit will be allowed for it.

* May be chosen as advanced work by special arrangement only.

ASTRONOMY.

ARMIN (). LEUSCHNER, Ph.D., Sc.D., Associate Professor of Astronomy

and Geodesy, and Director of the Students' Observatory. RUSSELL T. CRAWFORD, Ph.D., Instructor in Practical Astronomy. ADELAIDE M. HOBE, B.S., Assistant in Astronomy. ALLEN F. GILLIHAN, M.D., Assistant in Practical Astronomy.

Special Announcement. A special announcement concerning the facilities and the courses of instruction in the Berkeley Astronomical Department, and in the Lick Astronomical Department, at Mount Hamilton, has been published. Copies may be obtained from the Director of the Lick Observatory, Mount Hamilton, California, or from the Director of the Students' Observatory, Berkeley, California.

Courses 1A, 1B, 2, and 5 are designed especially to fulfill the requirement in prescribed Natural Science for students in the Colleges of General Culture.

A part of course 1B consists of special lectures at the regular hour by the Director and Astronomers of the Lick Observatory.

Geodesy, navigation, and nautical astronomy, especially adapted to the needs of students in the College of Commerce, will be included in Courses 2 to 4, but a special section for such students may be formed.

1a. Elements of Astronomy.

Dr. CRAWFORD. An introductory course. General facts and principles underlying

the science of astronomy in all its branches. 2 hrs., first half-year. Tu Th, 11.

13. Modern Astronomy. Associate Professor LEUSCHNER,

the Director and Astronomers of the Lick Observatory. Progress in astronomy through modern methods, especially spec

troscopic and photographic. 3 hrs., second half-year. Tu Th, 11; S, 9.

For observatory work in connection with Courses 1A and 13 students will ordinarily elect Course 2; but may, instead, take Course 4a or 4B, subject to the prerequisites announced.

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2. Supplement to Courses 1A and 1B.

Dr. CRAWFORD and Dr. GILLIHAN. Practice in observing in connection with Courses la and 1B. One

or two evenings or afternoons a week at the observatory. 3 or 6 hrs., throughout the year, as the student may elect; 3 or 6

units. The observatory is open for this two evenings, two afternoons, and S, morning. The course is open to students who are taking or have taken Course la or 3.

3. General Astronomy. (G.E.)

Dr. CRAWFORD. 3 hrs., first half-year. Hours to be arranged with the instructor.

Prerequisite: A knowledge of general physics. For observatory work in connection with this course, students may elect Course 2, 4a, or 4B, subject to the prerequisites announced.

4a. Practical Astronomy. (G.E.)

Associate Professor LEUSCHNER and Dr. CRAWFORD. Lectures and observatory work. Geodesy, navigation, and nautical

astronomy. Practical work at the observatory with sextant, clock, chronograph, transit-and-zenith telescope, equatorial

telescope, alt-azimuth instrument. Computing. 7 hrs., 3 units, first half-year; 8 hrs.; 4 units, second half-year.

First half-year, lecture Tu or Th, 9; observatory, Tu Th, 7-10 p.m.; second half-year, lectures Tu Th, 9; observatory, Tu Th,

Prerequisite: Course 7 in Mathematics; either Course la or 3 in Astronomy. The course should also be preceded by a course in differential calculus.

7-10 p.m.

48. Practical Astronomy. (G.E.)

Dr. CRAWFORD, Dr. GILLIHAN, and

Associate Professor LEUSCHNER. The subject-matter of Course 4a more briefly presented, and

adapted to the needs of students of Civil Engineering. 7 hrs.; 3 units, first half-year; 3 hrs.; 1 unit, second half-year.

First half-year, lecture, Tu or Th, 9, and two observatory periods; second half-year, one observatory period. The observatory is open for this course four evenings, and S, morning. The arrangement of the work depends so largely upon weather conditions, that the student should reserve for this course several observatory periods. Prerequisite for students not in the College of Civil Engineering: Course 7 in Mathematics; either Course la or 3 in Astronomy. Prescribed, Senior year, in the Course in Railroad Engineering, College of Civil Engineering.

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