History of Spanish literature, Količina 2

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Ticknor and Fields, 1864
 

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Stran 116 - ... no ha sido otro mi deseo que poner en aborrecimiento de los hombres las fingidas y disparatadas historias de los libros de caballerías, que por las de mi verdadero don Quijote van ya tropezando, y han de caer del todo sin duda alguna.- Vale
Stran 127 - Milton — have no doubt risen to loftier heights, and placed themselves in more imposing relations with the noblest attributes of our nature ; but Cervantes — always writing under the unchecked impulse of his own genius, and instinctively concentrating in his fiction whatever was peculiar to the character of his nation — has shown himself of kindred to all times and all lands ; to the humblest degrees of cultivation aa well as to the highest ; and has thns, beyond all other writers, received...
Stran 68 - And dost thou, holy Shepherd, leave Thine unprotected flock alone, Here, in this darksome vale, to grieve, While thou ascend'st thy glorious throne ? " O, where can they their hopes now turn, Who never lived but on thy love ? Where rest the hearts for thee that burn, When thou art lost in light above ? " How shall those eyes now find repose That turn, in vain, thy smile to see ? What can they hear save mortal woes, Who lose thy voice's melody ? " And who shall lay his tranquil hand Upon the troubled...
Stran 37 - In his latter days he tells us that— ' The whole stock of a manager was contained in a large sack, and consisted of four white shepherd's jackets, turned up with leather, gilt or stamped; four beards and false sets of hanging locks, and four shepherd's crooks, more or less. The plays were colloquies like eclogues between two or three shepherds and a shepherdess...
Stran 391 - It leads him to repeat from himself till many of his personages become standing characters, and his heroes and their servants, his ladies and their confidants, his old men and his buffoons, seem to be produced, like the masked figures of the ancient theatre, to represent, with the same attributes and in the same costume, the different intrigues of his various plots. It leads him, in short, to regard the whole of the Spanish drama as a form, within whose limits his imagination may be indulged without...
Stran 157 - O, hush, then, and keep Your branches all still, — My babe is asleep! Cold blasts wheel about him, — A rigorous storm, — And ye see how, in vain, I would shelter his form; — Holy angels and blest, As above me ye sweep, Hold these branches at rest, — My babe is asleep!
Stran 119 - ... all into the plain prose of truth with an admirable simplicity, quite unconscious of its own humor, and rendered the more striking by its contrast with the lofty and courteous dignity and magnificent illusions of the superior personage. There could, of course, be but one consistent termination of adventures like these. The knight and his esquire suffer a series of ridiculous discomfitures, and are at last brought home, like madmen, to their native village, where Cervantes leaves them, with an...
Stran 390 - He has given to the whole a new coloring, and in some respects, a new physiognomy. His drama is more poetical in its tone and tendencies, and, has less the air of truth and reality, than that of his great predecessor. In its more successful portions — which are rarely objectionable from their moral tone — its seems almost as if we were transported to another and more gorgeous world, where the scenery is lighted up...
Stran 88 - There is nothing of so much dignity in the incantations of Marlowe's " Faustus," which belong to the contemporary period of the English stage ; nor does even Shakspeare demand from us a sympathy so strange with the mortal head reluctantly rising to answer Macbeth's guilty question...
Stran 130 - ... with all its unquenchable and irresistible humor, with its bright views of the world, and its cheerful trust in goodness and virtue — it was written in his old age, at the conclusion of a life nearly every step of which had been marked with disappointed expectations, disheartening struggles and sore calamities ; that he began it in a prison, and that it was finished when he felt the hand of death pressing heavy and cold upon his heart. If this be remembered as we read, we may feel, as we ought...

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