History of Spanish literature, Količina 1

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John Murray, 1849
 

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Stran 17 - Their shields before their breasts, forth at once they go, Their lances in the rest levelled fair and low ; Their banners and their crests waving in a row, Their heads all stooping down towards the saddle bow. The Cid was in the midst, his shout was heard afar, " I am Rui Diaz, the champion of Bivar ; Strike amongst them, gentlemen, for sweet mercies...
Stran 197 - ... accounts of the battles of Hazinas and Tolosa, or in the grand and glorious drama of the fall of Granada. Indeed, wherever we go under their leading, whether to the court of Tamerlane, or to that of Saint Ferdinand, we find the heroic elements of the national genius gathered around us ; and thus, in this vast, rich mass of chronicles, containing such a body of antiquities, traditions, and fables as has been offered to no other people, we are constantly discovering, not only the materials from...
Stran 48 - ... not one another, for, while they live in disagreement, they shall not dare to make any discourse against their lord, for fear faith and secrecy should not be kept among themselves ; and the third way is, that they strive to make them poor, and to put them upon great undertakings, which they...
Stran 19 - Traitor ! wilt thou never cease to slander and to lie ? " You breakfast before mass, you drink before you pray; " There is no honour in your heart, nor truth in what you say ; " You cheat your comrade and your Lord, you flatter to betray.: " Your hatred I despise, your friendship I defy. " False to all mankind, and most to God on high, " I shall force you to confess that what I say is true.
Stran 18 - When they wheel'd and turn'd, as many more lay slain, You might see them raise their lances and level them again. There you might see the breastplates, how they were cleft in twain, And many a Moorish shield lie shatter'd on the plain. The pennons that were white marked with a crimson stain, The horses running wild whose riders had been slain.
Stran 131 - My mother gave thy steed ; Thy spurs were buckled by these hands, That thou no grace might'st need. And had not chance forbid the vow, I thought with thee to wed ; But Count Lozano's daughter fair Thy happy bride was led. With her came wealth, an ample store, But power was mine, and state : Broad lands are good, and have their grace, But he that reigns is great. Thy wife is well; thy match was wise; Yet, Roderic! at thy side A vassal's daughter sits by thee, And not a royal bride ! u u This is a...
Stran 47 - A tyrant doth signify a cruel lord, who by force, or by craft, or by treachery, hath obtained power over any realm or country ; and such men be of such nature, that, when once they have grown strong in the land, they love rather to work their own profit, though it...
Stran 430 - From the abject title-pages and dedications of the authors themselves, through the crowd of certificates collected from their friends to establish the orthodoxy of works that were often as little connected with religion as fairy tales, down to the colophon, supplicating pardon for any unconscious neglect of the authority of the Church, or any too free use of classical mythology, we are continually oppressed with painful proofs, not only how completely the human mind was enslaved in Spain, but how...
Stran 49 - ... drinking, and also in their carriage and dress, and of good manners in all things, and especially that they be not given to anger ; for, besides the wickedness that lieth in it, it is the thing in the world that most easily leadeth women to do ill. And they ought to teach them to be handy in performing those works that belong to noble ladies; for this is a matter that becometh them much, since they obtain by it cheerfulness and a quiet spirit ; and besides, it taketh away bad thoughts, which...
Stran 90 - IO mother, you would sorrow, if you looked upon me here ; For my neck is bound with chains, and I live in grief and fear, Like a traitor by my brethren sold, like a captive to the spear. "They have sold me! they have sold me ! though I never did them harm ; They have torn me from my father, from his strong and living arm ; By art and cunning they enticed me, and by falsehood's guilty charm, And I go a base-bought captive, full of sorrow and alarm.

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