History of Spanish Literature, Količina 2

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John Murray, 1849
 

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Stran 230 - ... their character, co-operating with the peculiar and most stimulating influences of their early history. We close our remarks on Lope de Vega with some excellent reflections of our author on the rapidity of his composition, and showing to what extent his genius was reverenced by his contemporaries : " Lope de Vega's immediate success, as we have seen, was in proportion to his rare powers and favorable opportunities. For a long time nobody else was willingly heard on the stage; and during the whole...
Stran 97 - ... exulting in his success as an achievement of no small moment. And such, in fact, it was, for we have abundant proof that the fanaticism for these romances was so great in Spain, during the sixteenth century, as to have become matter of alarm to the more judicious....
Stran 109 - ... fiction, and as one of the most remarkable monuments of modern genius. But though this may be enough to fill the measure of human fame and glory, it is not all to which Cervantes is entitled ; for, if we would do him the justice that would have been dearest to his own spirit, and even if we would ourselves fully comprehend and enjoy the whole of his Don Quixote, we should, as we read it, bear in mind, that this delightful romance was not the result of a youthful exuberance of feeling and a happy...
Stran 370 - He then sets before us only models of ideal beauty, perfection, and splendor, — a world, he would have it, into which nothing should enter but the highest elements of the national genius. There, the fervid yet grave enthusiasm of the old Castilian heroism, the chivalrous adventures of modern, courtly honor, the generous self-devotion of individual loyalty, and that reserved but passionate love which, in a state of society where it was so rigorously withdrawn from notice, became a kind of unacknowledged...
Stran 15 - In his latter days he tells us that— ' The whole stock of a manager was contained in a large sack, and consisted of four white shepherd's jackets, turned up with leather, gilt or stamped; four beards and false sets of hanging locks, and four shepherd's crooks, more or less. The plays were colloquies like eclogues between two or three shepherds and a shepherdess...
Stran 110 - ... cheerful trust in goodness and virtue — it was written in his old age, at the conclusion of a life nearly every step of which had been marked with disappointed expectations, disheartening struggles and sore calamities ; that he began it in a prison, and that it was finished when he felt the hand of death pressing heavy and cold upon his heart. If this be remembered as we read, we may feel, as we ought to feel, what admiration and reverence are due, not only to the living power of Don Quixote,...
Stran 45 - How shall those eyes now find repose That turn, in vain, thy smile to see? What can they hear save mortal woes, Who lose thy voice's melody ? " And who shall lay his tranquil hand Upon the troubled ocean's might ? Who bush the wind by his command?
Stran 66 - There is nothing of so much dignity in the incantations of Marlowe's "Faustus," which belong to the contemporary period of the English stage ; nor does even Shakspeare demand from us a sympathy so strange with the mortal head reluctantly rising to answer Macbeth's guilty question...
Stran 99 - ... ceased, with one or two unimportant exceptions, to be reprinted ; so that, from that time to the present, they have been constantly disappearing, until they are now among the rarest of literary curiosities — a solitary instance of the power of genius to destroy, by a single well-timed blow, an entire department, and that, too, a flourishing and favored one, in the literature of a great and proud nation. The general plan Cervantes adopted to accomplish this object, without, perhaps, foreseeing...
Stran 106 - ... to loftier heights, and placed themselves in more imposing relations with the noblest attributes of our nature; but Cervantes — always writing under the unchecked impulse of his own genius, and instinctively concentrating in his fiction whatever was peculiar to the character of his nation — has shown himself of kindred to all times and all lands ; to the humblest degrees of cultivation as well as to the highest; and has thus, beyond all other writers, received in return a tribute of sympathy...

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