HISTORY OF THE UNITED STATES

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Charles Augustus of SaxeWeimar 95 Goethe and the class
100
Declines the overture of Franklin 106 Protects Arthur
109
His opinion of Englands position after the defeat of Burgoyne 113
115
Bunker Hill 120 In retreating to Halifax 120 On Long Island 121
121
Divides his army 121 His waste of time 121 His winter in Philadel
122
vice of Lee 128 He commands the advanced corps 128 His negligence
129
Dismissed by Congress 134 Character 134 Death 134 Carvers
135
ion of Gibbon 140 Howe 141 Clinton 141 Germain 141 North
141
The French squadron pursues the British 147 A hurricane
148
Their menaces 151 _Their conduct condemned in the house of commons
151
CHAPTER VI
157
Admiral Keppel captures a French frigate 162 DOrvilliers sent out
164
feited by the British 168 Loan Offices 169Lottery 169Forced cir
170
the Americans 176 Impracticable plan for emancipating Canada 176
176
He observes the attachment of the United States to England
182
Gouverneur Morris 183 Of Jay 183 Vergennes on the American
189
Vincennes 195 Kaskaskia 196 Its capture by Clark
196
Further merits of the backwoodsmen 201 Expedition under Evan Shelby
202
Counter argument of Vergennes 211 French minister endeavors to per
213
Stormy debate on the fisheries 218 The French minister endeavors to
220
Matthews predatory expedition 223 Retaliation of the Virginia legisla
226
the country of the Onondagas 230 Sullivan appointed to command
231
Absorb the West Indies 236 Condition of Spanish South
239
At East Haven 226 At Fairfield 226 At Norwalk 227 Address
241
PROGRESS OF THE WAR IN EUROPE 1779
245
Combined fleet disperses 250 Dejection in France 250 Maria Theresa
252
THE ARMED NEUTRALITY 17781780
255
merce from the American commissioners 261 Neglect and silence of
264
Conflicting aggressions of France and England in the Netherlands
270
alliance with England 273 Answer of Panin 273 Memorial of
281
Expedition sent out by Prevost to plunder 284 Sunbury summoned
284
His previous life 287 Movements of the new commander 287 Repulse
293
French and British fleets 295 French recover the superiority 295 DEs
299
Lincoln reenforced by the Virginia line 304 Arbuthnot enters the harbor
301
Expeditions sent out by Clinton 306 Williamson surrenders Ninetysix
307
a constitution 364 Work of John Adams 365 Of Lowell 365
368
Retreat of the British 374 Committee of congress in camp 374 Clinton
374
Clinton embarks troops 383 André on board the Vulture
383
History of West Point 385 Interview of Washington with Roclambeau
392
emissions of paper money 398 Henry Laurens sent to negotiate a loan
398
Proposal for a bank at Philadelphia with power to issue notes 405
405
John Adams on the powers of congress 408 Conventions
411
great officers of state 412 Relies to excess on a bank of the United States
413
congress to regulate commerce 419 Consent of Virginia 419 Her efforts
423
His answer to the complaints of the Dutch 426 Mariotts
431
Yorke informs Stormont of the weakness of the Dutch 436 His recom
437
of Stormont for the punishment of the Amsterdam offenders 438
438
Neckers letter to Lord North 444 Vergennes on Necker
444
Americas need of money 446 Advice of Washington 446 Complaints
452
Complaint of Cornwallis 457 Greenes answer 457
459
plundering tories 461 Cornwallis despatches Tarleton to cut off Morgans
467
Junction of the American army at Guilford courthouse 472 Greenes
474
Pickens routs a body of loyalists under Pyle 474 Cornwallis strives
480
to Germain 484 Germain instructs Clinton to further the plan of a cam
485
The Dutch desire to continue at peace with England 437 Demand
487
Greene at the high hills of Santee 493 Rawdon sails for England
492
ette detached to Virginia 497 Arrival of Phillips with reenforcements
498
His orders from Clinton 506 Jealousy between Clinton and Corn
505
Cornwallis determines to fortify York and Gloucester 511 Lafayettes
513
Storming party under Hamilton 519 Heroism of Olney
520
CHAPTER XVI
526
ENGLAND REFUSES TO CONTINUE THE AMERICAN WAR 1782
533
ROCKINGHAMS MINISTRY ASSENTS TO AMERICAN INDEPENDENCE 1782
538
victory of Rodney over De Grasse 545 It reconciles England to peace
545
CHAPTER XXVIII
551
ment of American independence 558 His mistrust 559 The peril
560
covers Georgia 563 His conduct at Sharon 563 Evacuation of Savan
567
Morriss budget for 1783 571 Proposal of Madison to empower congress
573
tons opinion 578 Agitation of the king 578 Jay and De Aranda
579
Old debts still valid 585 Refusal of indemnity to
588

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Stran 365 - All men are born free and equal, and have certain natural, essential, and unalienable rights; among which may be reckoned the right of enjoying and defending their lives and liberties; that of acquiring, possessing, and protecting property; in fine, that of seeking and obtaining their safety and happiness.
Stran 225 - That no man shall be compelled to frequent or support any religious worship, place or ministry whatsoever, nor shall be enforced, restrained, molested, or burthened in his body or goods, nor shall otherwise suffer on account of his religious opinions or belief; but that all men shall be free to profess, and by argument to maintain, their opinions in matters of religion, and that the same shall in no wise diminish, enlarge, or affect their civil capacities.
Stran 361 - ... hath made of one blood all nations of men for to dwell on the face of the earth...
Stran 224 - ... truth is great and will prevail if left to herself, that she is the proper and sufficient antagonist to error, and has nothing to fear from the conflict, unless by human interposition disarmed of her natural weapons, free argument and debate, errors ceasing to be dangerous when it is permitted freely to contradict them.
Stran 357 - Nothing is more certainly written in the book of fate, than that these people are to be free ; nor is it less certain that the two races, equally free, cannot live in the same government.
Stran 529 - I congratulate you, as the friend of America ; I trust, as not the enemy of England ; I am sure, as the friend of mankind, on the resolution of the house of commons, carried by a majority of nineteen at two o'clock this morning, in a very full house. It was the declaration of two hundred and thirty-four ; I think it was the opinion of the whole.
Stran 413 - States and be settled and formed into distinct republican States, which shall become members of the Federal Union and have the same rights of sovereignty, freedom and independence as the other States...
Stran 389 - It is no less, sir, in a confidence of the generosity of your mind, than on account of your superior station, that I have chosen to importune you with this letter. I have the honor to be with great respect, sir, Your Excellency's most obedient and most humble servant, John Andre, Adjutant General.
Stran 390 - The Board having maturely considered these facts, do also report to his Excellency General Washington, that Major Andre, adjutant general to the British army, ought to be considered as a spy from the enemy, and that agreeable to the law and usage of nations, it is their opinion he ought to suffer death.
Stran 395 - Poor Andre suffers to-day; everything that is amiable in virtue, in fortitude, in delicate sentiment, and accomplished manners pleads for him ; but hard-hearted policy calls for a sacrifice. He must die — I send you my account of Arnold's affair, and to justify myself to your sentiments, I must inform you, that I urged a compliance with Andre's request...

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