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THE DIPLOMATIC CORPS*

AMBASSADORS

Brazil (Vacant).

ENVOYS EXTRAORDINARY AND MINISTERS PLENIPOTENTIARY

China (vacant), Chile, Germany, Spain (vacant), Italy, Switzerland, Holland, Guatemala, Norway, Japan, Uruguay, Argentina, Panama.

MINISTERS RESIDENT Nicaragua, Colombia.

CHARGÉS D'AFFAIRES Belgium, Peru, Czechoslovakia.

CHARGÉS D'AFFAIRES AD-INTERIM United States, France, Spain, Cuba, China, Brazil.

DIPLOMATIC SERVICE OF THE UNITED STATES IN

MEXICO1

(Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary)

GEORGE T. SUMMERLIN, Counselor
L. LANIER WINSLOW, First Secretary
BENJAMIN MUSE, Third Secretary
WILLIAM A. Taylor, JR., Third Secretary
COL. FRANCIS LEJ. PARKER, Mil. Att.
MAJ. EDWARD L. N. GLASS, Asst. Mil. Att.

*October, 1923,

1Corrected to July, 1923. Since that date, Mr. Summerlin and Col. Parker have been transferred and Mr. Charles B. Warren has been appointed Ambassador and is now at his post.

CONSULAR SERVICE OF THE UNITED STATES IN

MEXICO

Acapulco, Guerrero .
Acapulco, Guerrero, George A. Bucklin.
Acapulco, Guerrero, Harry K. Pangburn..
Aguascalientes, Aguascalientes, Lee R. Blohm...
Aguascalientes, Aguascalientes, Harold G. Bretherton.
Chihuahua, Chihuahua
Chihuahua, Chihuahua, W. M. Parker Mitchell.
Chihuahua, Chihuahua, Harry B. Ott.....

Parral. Chihuahua
Ciudad Juarez, Chihuahua....
Ciudad Juarez, Chihuahua, John W. Dye.
Cindad Juarez, Chihuahua, Oscar C. Harper.
Durango
Ensenada, Lower California.
Ensenada, Lower California, Leighton Hope....
Ensenada, Lower California, Carney B. Lyle, Jr.
Frontera, Tabasco
Frontera, Tabasco, Robert L. Rankin.
Guadalajara, Jalisco, Andrew J. McConnico.
Guadalajara, Jalisco, Anthony Sherman.
Guaymas, Sonora, Bartley F. Yost....
Guaymas, Sonora, John A. McPherson.
Guaymas, Sonora, Harold C. Wood...
Manzanillo, Colima .
Manzanillo, Colima, Stephen E. Aguirre.
Matamoros, Tamaulipas, Gilbert R. Willson.
Matamoros, Tamaulipas, Henry G. Krausse.
Mazatlan, Sinaloa, William E. Chapman.
Mazatlan, Sinaloa

Los Mochis, Sinaloa, Harold Frederic Jones.
Mexicali, Lower California.
Mexicali, Lower California, Henry C. von Struve.
Mexicali, Lower California, Charles W. Doherty.
Mexico City
Mexico City, Claude I. Dawson..
Mexico City, Thomas D. Bowman.

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Corrected to July 1, 1923.

Mexico City, Edward P. Lowry..
Mexico City, Ernest E. Evans..
Mexico City, John McArdle

Puebla, Puebla, William 0. Jenkins.
Monterey, Nuevo Leon....
Monterey, Nuevo Leon, Paul H. Foster.
Monterey, Nuevo Leon, George D. FitzSimmons.
Nogales, Sonora
Nogales, Sonora, Henry C. A. Damm
Nogales, Sonora

Agua Prieta, Sonora, William W. Young.

Cananea, Sonora, Jeptha M. Gibbs.
Nuevo Laredo, Tamaulipas..
Nuevo Laredo, Tamaulipas, Harry L. Walsh.
Piedras Negras, Coahuila, William P. Blocker.
Piedras Negras, Coahuila, Ellis A. Bonnet.
Progreso, Yucatan, 0. Gaylord Marsh.
Progreso, Yucatan, Herman E. Gimler.
Salina Cruz, Oaxaca
Salina Cruz, Oaxaca, George E. Seltzer.
Saltillo, Coahuila ...
Saltillo, Coahuila, Fred R. Robinson.
Saltillo, Coahulia, Earl Wilbert Eaton.
San Luis Potosi, San Luis Potosi...
San Luis Potosi, San Luis Potosi, Walter F. Boyle.
San Luis Potosi, San Luis Potosi...
Tampico, Tamaulipas....
Tampico, Tamaulipas, James B. Stewart.
Tampico, Tamaulipas, Peter H. A. Flood.
Tampico, Tamaulipas, Thomas S. Horn.
Tampico, Tamaulipas, William A. Dunlap.
Tampico, Tamaulipas, Clarence A. Miller.

Lobos, Vera Cruz, Donald A. Mathers.

Tuxpam, Vera Cruz, Albert J. Hoskins.
Torreon, Coahuila, Chester Donaldson..
Torreon, Coahuila
Vera Cruz, Vera Cruz.
Vera Cruz, Vera Cruz, John Q. Wood..
Vera Cruz, Vera Cruz, Willys A. Myers.

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SECTION III—COMMERCE

FOREIGN COMMERCE OF MEXICO IN FIRST HALF OF 1923, COMPARED WITH SIMILAR PERIOD OF 1910,

1920, 1921 AND 19221

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GENERAL INFORMATION SHEET. THE MEXICO CITY

CONSULAR DISTRICT

POPULATION, RACE AND STANDARDS OF LIVING This Consular District includes the Federal District, the States of Mexico, Queretaro, Hidalgo, Tlaxcala, Morelos and Puebla, and parts of the States of Michoacan and Oaxaca. The population, according to the 1921 census, is approximately six millions, or nearly one-half the population of the Republic.

Most of the inhabitants outside of the cities are full-blood Indians. Of the total population at least 80% are illiterate and indigent having the lowest standards of living, consuming the barest necessities of clothing, food and shelter and no luxuries. Corn and beans constitute the staple articles of food. Scant cotton covering for the body with, perhaps, a native blanket for a winter coat and sandals for the feet supply the usual clothing. Four walls and a roof, with dirt floor and no heating or sanitary accommodations is the customary housing for a family of this numerous class.

There is no middle class outside of the cities where clerks, small tradesmen and minor government officials form a limited class between the two extremes.

AREA, CLIMATE AND TOPOGRAPHY The area of the Mexico City District is approximately 108,000 square miles. The greater part lies on the high plateau and is very mountainous but with many fertile valleys. Mexico City has an altitude of 7,434 feet above sea level. The climate is equable; the temperature ranging from 35 to 90 degrees, but rarely reaching either extreme. The mean temperature is 65 degrees. The rainy season is from May or June until October. The rest of the year is normally dry but precipitation is abundant for the successful cultivation of the land without irrigation.

The following report was prepared in the office of the American Consul General in Mexico City on December 17, 1923. It is here published with the permission of the Department of State and the Department of Commerce. Mr. Claude I. Dawson, American Consul General in Mexico City, to Consul Clarence D. Bowman, and to Vice Consul Earnest E Evans, who personally prepared the report, the editor is under many obligations.

To

LANGUAGE, POSTAGE AND CUSTOMS POLICY The language of the district is Spanish. English and French are widely spoken in official and business circles.

The postage rate for first-class mail from the United States to Mexico is the same as the domestic rate in the United States. From Mexico to the U. S., however, the rate is 5c per 20 grams. American stamps should not be sent to Mexico when it is desired to prepay a reply. International Reply Coupons, which may be purchased in United States Post-offices, should be used for this purpose.

The Mexican Customs tariff is specific and based on the weight of the merchandise in most cases; being divided into three general classifications, viz., gross, legal and net weight. The gross weight includes all packing whatsoever; the legal weight includes only immediate containers, such as bottles, cans, etc.; the net weight is the actual weight of the product exclusive of all packing.

In addition to the regular duty there are two surcharges prevailing at the date of this report, being 10% and 2% respectively, of the duty assessed.

Imports by parcels post bear a surcharge of 25% of the duty assessed.

An invoice certified by a Mexican Consular officer must be presented with each shipment. The Consular fee is 5% of the value of the merchandise.

Care should be exercised in stating correct weights of mer. chandise, gross, net and legal, as the fines for misstatement of weights are very severe.

The classification of the Mexican Customs Tariff is incomplete and it is often impossible to arrive at an advance estimate of the duty to be paid.

The Mexican Customs Tariff is subject to change by presidential decree without previous notice.

Except for parcels post shipments it is not practicable to ship merchandise into Mexico without the services of a competent customs broker at the port of entry.

IMPORTS AND EXPORTS The principal articles of import into Mexico for the fiscal year ended June 30, 1922, in the order of their importance were: Corn, locomotives, lard, railway coaches, cotton piece goods, yellow pine lumber, petroleum products, eggs, flour, shoes, coal, machinery, preserved fruit products. The preponderance of these imports came from the United States. The total value of the imports from the U. S. for the calendar year 1921 was $198,325,568 U. S. currency. There are no sources of information from which can be determined the proportion of these imports destined for Mexico City but as this is the most important distributing center

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