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of the same be filed, one of which copies shall be certified under the seal of the Commissioner of Patents, and re· turned to the registrant.

Form 135—Application for Registration.

FOR AN INDIVIDUAL.

To the Commissioner of Patents:

The undersigned, John Fisher, of the city of Brooklyn, County of Alameda, and State of California, and a citizen of the United States (or resident therein, as the case may be), hereby furnishes five copies of a print (or “label," as the case may be), of which he is the sole proprietor.

The said print [or“ label ”] consists of the words and figures as follows, to wit: [Description.)

And he hereby requests that the said print be registered in the Patent-office, in accordance with the Act of Congress to that effect, approved June 18, 1874.

Brooklyn, Cal., August 1, 1879.

Proprietor,

Form 136For a Corporation. The applicant, a corporation created by authority of the laws of the State of [as the case may be), and doing business in said State, hereby furnishes five copies of a label (or “print,” as the case may be), of which it is the sole proprietor.

The said label consists of the words and figures as follows, to wit: (Description.)

And it is hereby requested that the said label be registered in the Patent-office, in accordance with the Act of Congress to that effect, approved June 18, 1874. Witness the seal of the said corporation at

1879.

(SEAL.]

President (or other officer). The certificate of such registration will continue in force for twenty-eight years.

The fee for registration of a print or label is six dollars, to be paid in the same manner as fees for patents.

The benefits of this Act seem to be confined to citizens, or residents, of the United States.

Directions for Securing Copyrights under the Revised Act of

Congress, which took effect August 1, 1874. 1. A printed copy of the title of the book, map, chart, dramatic or musical composition, engraving, cut, print, photograph, or a description of the painting, drawing, chromo, statue, statuary, or model or design for a work of the fine arts, for which copyright is desired, must be sent by mail or otherwise, prepaid, addressed "Librarian of Congress, Washington, D. C.” This must be done before publication of the book or other article.

2. A fee of fifty cents, for recording the title of each book or other article, must be inclosed with the title as above, and fifty cents in addition (or one dollar in all) for each certificate of copyright under seal of the Librarian of Congress, which will be transmitted by return mail.

3. Within ten days after publication of each book or other article, two complete copies of the best edition issued must be sent, to perfect the copyright, with the address “Librarian of Congress, Washington, D. C.” It is optional with those sending books and other articles to perfect copyright, to send them by mail or express; but, in either case, the charges are to be prepaid by the senders. Without the deposit of copies above required the copyright is void, and a penalty of twenty-five dollars is incurred. No copy is required to be deposited elsewhere.

4. No copyright is valid unless notice is given by inserting in every copy published, on the title-page or the page following, if it be a book; or, if a map, chart, musical composition, print, cut, engraving, photograph, painting, drawing, cromo, statue, statuary, or model or design intended to be perfected as a work of the fine arts, by inscribing upon some portion thereof, or on the subtance on which the same is mounted, the following words, viz: Entered according to act of Congress, in the year , by

in the office of the Librarian of Congress, at Washington;or, at the option of the person entering the copyright, the words: Copyright, 18—, by

The law imposes a penalty of one hundred dollars upon any person who has not obtained copyright who shall insert the notice Entered according to Act of Congress,” or Copyright," etc., or words of the same import, in or upon any book or other article.

5. Any author may reserve the right to translate or to dramatize his own work. In this case, notice should be given by printing the words Right of translation reserved," or “ All rights reserved," below the notice of copyright entry, and notifying the Librarian of Congress of such reservation, to be entered upon the record.

6. Each copyright secures the exclusive right of publishing the book or article copyrighted for the term of twentyeight years. Six months before the end of that time, the author or designer, or his widow or children, may secure a renewal for the further term of fourteen years, making forty-two years in all. Applications for renewal must be accompanied by explicit statement of ownership, in the case of the author, or of relationship, in the case of his heirs, and must state definitely the date and place of entry of the original copyright.

7. The time within which any work copyrighted may be issued from the press is not limited by any law or regulation, but depends upon the discretion of the proprietor. A copyright may be secured for a projected work as well as for a completed one.

8. Any copyright is assignable in law by any instrument of writing, but such assignment must be recorded in the office of the Librarian of Congress within sixty days from its date. The fee for this record and certificate is one dollar, and for a certified copy of any record of assignment one dollar.

9. A copy of the record (or duplicate certificate) of any copyright entry will be furnished, under seal, at the rate of fifty cents each.

10. In the case of books published in more than one volume, or of periodicals published in numbers, or of engravings, photographs, or other articles published with variations, a copyright is to be taken out for each volume or part of a book, or number of a periodical, or variety, as to size, title, or inscription, of any other article.

11. To secure a copyright for a painting, statue, or model or design intended to be perfected as a work of the fine arts, so as to prevent infringement by copying, engraving, or vending such design, a definite description must accompany the application for copyright, and a photograph of the same, at least as large as “cabinet size," must be mailed to the Librarian of Congress within ten days from the completion of the work.

12. Copyrights cannot be granted upon Trade-marks, nor upon Labels intended to be used with any article of manufacture.

If protection for such prints or labels is desired, application must be made to the Patent-office, where they are registered at a fee of six dollars for labels and twentyfive dollars for trade-marks.

13. Every applicant for a copyright must state distinctly the name and residence of the claimant, and whether the right is claimed as author, designer, or proprietor. No aflidavit or formal application is required.

CHAPTER XII.

NATURALIZATION, AND FURTHER CIVIL AND CRIMINAL FORMS.

In order for a frea white person, born in a foreign country, to become a citizen of the United States, it is necessary that he should make a declaration under oath, at least two years before his admission, of his intention to become a citizen, and must renounce his allegiance to his own sovereign. This declaration must be made before

First. Any State Court, being a Court of Record, and having a seal and Clerk and common-law jurisdiction.

Second. Before a Circuit Court of the United States.
Third. Before a District Court of the United States.
Fourth. Before a Clerk of either of these Courts.

After he has been a resident of the United States for five years, and has made his declaration of intentions at least two years before, he may then be admitted to the rights of citizenship. In order for this he must prove, by the oath of two citizens of the United States, that he has been a resident of the United States for five

years and one year within the State where the Court is held.

He must also take an oath to support the Constitution of the United States, and on oath to renounce and abjure his native allegiance.

If he have been a minor, and shall have resided in the United States for three years next before his attaining his majority, he may be admitted without such declaration, on proving by two witnesses that he has resided five years in the United States, three years as a minor and two since he became of age, making the declaration of his intentions at the time of his admission, and declaring on oath and proving to the satisfaction of the Court that for three years next preceding it had been his bona fide intention to become a citizen.

The alien's country must, at the time of his admission, be at peace with the United States.

If an alien die after having made his declaration of intention and before his admission, his widow and children are citizens.

The minor children of any one duly naturalized, if dwelling in the United States, are citizens.

Form 196.-Declaration of Intention.

I, John Doe, do declare on oath that it is bona fide my intention to become a citizen of the United States, and to renounce forever all allegiance and fidelity to all and any foreign prince, potentate, State and sovereignty whatever, and particularly to (the Queen of Great Britain and Ireland), of whom I was a subject.

JOHN DOE. Sworn in open Court, this

day of

184,

CLERK'S CERTIFICATE. I, John Smith, Clerk of the District Court of the United States, do certify that the above is a true copy of the original declaration of intention of John Doe to become a citizen of the United States, remaining of record in my office.

In testimony whereof, I have hereunto subscribed my name, and affixed the seal of the said Court, this one thousand eight hundred and

JOHN SMITH, Clerk. [SEAL OF THE COURT.]

day of

Form 197.—Affidavit of Minor,

}

In the matter of John Doe,

on his Naturalization. John Doe, being duly sworn, says that for the continued term of five years last past he has resided within the United States, and that for one year last past he has resided within the State of -; and at the time he so arrived in the United States he had not attained his eighteenth year; that it is bona fide his intention, and has been for the last three years, to become a citizen of the United States, and to renounce forever all allegiance and fidelity to all and every foreign prince, potentate, State and sovereignty whatever, and particularly to [Victoria the Queen of Great Britain and Ireland), of whom he was a subject.

JOHN DOE. Sworn in open Court, the

day of

18JOHN SMITH, Clerk.

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