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Honsehould of Henry VIII.
Howard the philanthropist
Howling of dogs

Hutton, William, life of
Ill-Health, observations on
Immoveable jaws
Impuissance, its meaning
Incubus, or night-mare
Indian poison for arrows
Influence of commerce on civilization

Inhumanity to brutes

INDEX.

79 Ladies' Library

178 Lady Maclean of Duart
179 Lakes, picturesque survey of
399 Lalla Rookh, observations on
406 La Mort

Kemble, the tragedian

his retirement
Klaproth and Langles
Koster's travels in Brazil

Kotzebue

Kumaon mountains

Kean, the tragedian 159, 428, 570,

and Sheridan

825

923

781

815 Late dinners, the cause of bankruptcy
606 Laudanum, to have proper bottles for
246 Laughable customs in Poland

342

639

522 Legends of Lampidosa

611, 633, 783, 905
475 Leonidas, and the Rape of the Sabines
Letters from a father to his son
from London

825
795, 861
382, 467

399

242

841

83

626

809

888

338
842

258

80

338

498
939

- of Dr. Franklin

-- of mrs. Carter

-- of lady Mary W. Montague

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714
590

343

590
339
761
142

343
999

Leviathan, the crocodile

Louis 16th, his imprisonment and death
840 Louvre in Paris

575 Lowe, author of Mary's dream, elegy on
993 Luke and Damien

Lewis's, J. description of Waterloo battle
Life of William Button, esq.
Lime-water as an extinguisher
Lioness, curious account of a

---

Literary criticism
forgeries
Literateur, its meaning
Long job
Longitude

630

52 Macbeth, as performed by Kean

182 Madame Mole

Maury, cardinal, his death
Mausoleum of Burns

Inhabit, inhabitable, their meaning
Insanity, simple remedy for
Insects in the human skin
Instinct of the monkey

935

872

Intelligence in literature and arts 79, 119, 575 Morality of the Parisians

344
327, 410, 482
706

Inventions and discoveries
Isle of Wight, sketches in the
Jacoba, countess of Hainault
Jessup, Samuel, his death
Jesuits' college in England
Joanna Southcote's disciples
Joseph's cup

Journey to Adam's Peak
Junius, letters of, ascribed to sir P.
Juvenile Books

695

730

496 Magnetism

333

499 Mahogany saw dust

924

79 Maiden and the Rose

47 Manuel, a tragedy

7
183

942 Marcheta mulier

101

242 Mariner's account of the Friendly Isles
394 Marshal Massena, his death

522

836

180 Martin Guerre, the mysterious husband 31, 78,
793
46
750, 893

145

946

Modern ceremony of taking the veil
Montague, Lady Mary W. letters of
Montgomery's thoughs on wheels
Moot point, illustrated

Morland, the painter, his life
Mousing hen
Muscular strength

$45 Music, an essay

936 Must, its meaning

497

981 Musty grain, experiments on
My eye, Betty Martin

478

Francis 79
318, 627
695, 911

371
372
825
730

167

842 theory of the sun
Night-mare

254

443

Measurement of the Kumaon mountains 254
MEMOIRS OF EMINENT PERSONS 62, 103, 183,
263, 346, 426, 499, 646, 750, 819
Memoir of Jacoba of Hainault
Merry Andrew, its meaning
Mezzotinto, discovery of
Miller, capt. his death

706

Miners, dreadful deaths of

Naples and the Campagna Felice
Napoleon medals

227

698

74

734

59

730

58

247

825

Narrative of Robert Adams, an American

sailor

Natural ingenuity
Neely's

's poems, strictures on
Neid J. memoirs of
New Musical instruments

873

805

424

26

893

999

181

223

746

343

738

933

502

461

72

95

658

334

839

937

862

805

739

496

144

829,912

184

592

121

342

584

51

563
247

15, 55

941

219

646

842

844

590

Novel-ading,a cause of female depravity 718

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104

669

601

339

547

920

422

231

493

446

945

588

615

416
51,657, 747
138

279

877

451
500

Seasons, similarity in

Selina, countess of Huntingdon
Serpents of the West Indies
Shakspeare's birth day
- writings

Sheep-shearing, dexterity in
Shottoe, miss Jane, her death
Siddons, mrs.

239, 286, 538

abolished by France
Smedley's Prescience
Snipe shooting
Spick and span
Sponging

Spurred rye, M. Virey on
Stael, madame de

Stanhope, sketch of his life

St. Cecilia and St. Catherine

Steam-boat accident

St. Mark's day

Stone, new cure for the

Sketches of a pedestrian in the isle of Wight

327, 410, 482

Slave trade

638

Strictures on Neele's poem

Striking contrasts

Stuart manuscripts

Suicide

- punished, post mortem

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Tales of my landlord
Talma, the French Garrick

Teeth, their beauty
Tempers, good and bad
Tenterden steeple
The three blue balls

314 Thomson, poetical character of
809 Thomson, William, his death
825 Thou art a dog in a doublet
79 Tiger buning in Ind ia

291 Timber, strength of

935 Villemain, the writer and orator
783 Visit to Petrarch's villa

919 Volcanic mountain

371

932

Swift, dean

333

Swiss scenery, uuconnected sketches of 282,
51,591, 699, 881
1, 43. 80

943

909

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Water, wood, and mountain scenery

659 Waterloo subscriptions
931

-- monuments erected at

499

924

446

261

182

932

941

745,942

426

255

661

747

99 Tissue, its meaning

420 Tombuctoo, description of

730 Tonga, or Friendly Isles
323 Tour in Poland
178 Transfusion of blood
937 Translation of the bible
934 Tricks upon travellers
345 Tri-coloured cockade

666, 938 Trip to Paris

251 Truly heroic action

917 Tuckey, capt. his journal

52

943
175
67

Unsuccessful machinations

59 VARIETIES, LITERARY, CRITICAL, AND BIS-

94h TORICAL 46, 94, 175, 334, 414, 587, 738, 840

492 Vaucluse, its valley and fountain

658 Veil, modern ceremony of taking the

284 Venus de' Medici

542

860

482

IS

599

629

589

41t

739

60

22, 62, 307, 394, 451

949
663

386

940

852

battle of, described by a soldier 26

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Church-yard

Churchill's grave, by Byron

Cossack's grave

Echoes

Elegy on John Lowe

Eolian harp

Epistle to the Emperor of China

Eric and Amabel

INDEX.

877 Wire bridges

57 Wives of literary men
406 Wonderful preservation
256 Wounds in the beart

Extract from an address to Napoleon

Farewell address, by Kemble

Fisher's grave

Flower of Love

Four Ages, translated from Ovid

Helen of Kirkconnell
Hohenelm

Incantation by lord Byron

In every change of busy life
In vain I court refreshing sleep
Jonah's Gourd

Keepsake, the

- song
-'s visit

POETRY.

198 Man and the monkey, a fable
679 Manfred, extract from

419

Wynne, James Huddlestone.

748 Young, Dr. inquiry into his moral character

737

90, 163

519

273, 358 Ode for the anniversary of the Jews' hos-

276

352

193 Mermaid's song

671 Midnight sketch
192 Miracle at Horeb
193 Moderate wishes
278 Northern spring

Darkness, by Byron

518 Progress of British sculpture

David's lamentation for Saul and Jonathan 78 Religion--There is a calm
Daylight, when the storm was o'er

436 Retirement

De Courcy

514 Reynolds, Richard, verses on
846 Romance

Deluge, translated from Ovid

Don Sebastian

111
354

Doris, from the German of Haller

Savoyard
Sea Nymph

357 She never told her love
72 Sighs, by mrs. Rolls
356 Soliloquy by dr. Sewell
848 Song of a lover

672 - by lord Thurlow
847
--- to the river Avon
595 - of a Highlander
197
- to my friend

593 Sound the loud timbrel o'er Egypt

758 Stanzas

Lalla Rookh extracts from
Lines by a Mother

-- on a goblet, by Byron
-- sent with a repeating watch
-written in Richmond church-yard

Lost dove

Love of fame, by Neele

671

924

-----

to time, by Neele

927 Oh why did you bid me awake

80, 117, 190 O lady buy these budding flowers

438 Original Epigram
928 Orphan, the

111 Palace of fame
114
-- of the sun
679 Prisoners of Chillon
69 Primrose, to the

275

434

pital

to fancy
----- to sleep

277

671

197

596

578, 675
194

--

594

674

849

751

---- written in sickness

-- on the sea-shore of Kent
Storm, written during a tempest

608 Tomb of love

Thoughts in a ball-room

The orb of light descending gave
There is an eye whose shaded light
To the oak that near my cottage grew

Vanity of Life

Vola, or sybil of the north

Visions of Youth

9.39

491

61

922

186

When Cupid prompts the virgin sigh
When winds breathe soft

Winter in Canada

222

70 Yorkshire angling
598 You bid me hope

872
850

515

845

278

71

273

929

928

117, 195

593
518

847

845

680

221

192

276

760

600

355

115

73

760

517

466

517

193

759

596

116

354

439

440

920

671

197

193

353

73

193

191

390

593

353

925

755

756

56

439

930
194

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"Old Mortality" is a sort of nick

The Tales are two in number, and are called "The Black Dwarf" and "Old Mortality." The scenes of both lie in Scotland, and the design of the author is declared to be, to portray the manners of his countrymen; and they are to be followed by others of the same character, at future period. The "Black Dwart" refers to the state of Scotland in the reign of Queen Anne, and "Old Mortality" speaks of its condition during the struggles by the Presbyterians in favour of the "solemn league and covenant," in the latter end of the reign of Charles II.

of this production without a convic- name, given by the people of Scotland to tion that it is by the author of Waverly, an antiquated Presbyterian, who having Guy Mannering, and the Antiquary, engaged and suffered in the struggles of though the title-page gives no such in- 1679, preserved his unshaken zeal for formation. his party, and, in his declining years, journied from burial-ground to burialground with his hammer and chisel, renewing the decayed names on the tombstones of those who had fought and fallen in the cause he had reverenced: from the details he supplied, Peter Pattieson is supposed to have framed the novel which bears his title.

The man who forms the principal feature, and who first excites and afterwards heads the Co e anters in the battles of London-Hill and Bothwell-Bridge, is John Balfour, of Burley, who assassinated Dr. Thorpe, archbishop of St. AnThe general title of "Tales of my drew's. He is a Highlander, or one Landlord" is derived from the circum-"of the hill-folk," of uncommonly sturstance, that they are supposed to have dy proportions, and of a mind corresbeen collected from the relations of diffe- ponding with his make-undaunted, rent persons at the Wallace-Inn at Gan- fierce, and zealous to the last degree in dercleugh. Mr. Peter Pattieson is sup- the holy cause he has espoused. He has posed to have been the writer and com- fled from the murder he has committed, piler of the tales, who, dying young, left and is sheltered, as a distressed traveller them to the care of Mr. Jedidiah Cleish- merely, by Henry Morton, the hero of botham, the schoolmaster, to whom he the tale, a young man of benevolence, had been usher and assistant. courage, and handsome proportions, who Eng. Mas. Vol. 1 is in love with Miss Edith Bellenger, the

B

31

Tales of My Landlord.

[*

grand-daughter of Lady Margaret Bel- confined by a green ribband from wanlenger, and neice to Major Bellenger. toning over her shoulders; her cast of The rival of Morton is Lord Evandale, features, soft and feminine, yet not withwho, though unsuccessful with the lady, out an expression of playful archness, is, we apprehend, too successful with the which redeemed their sweetness from the reader, for he attracts even more interest charge of insipidity, sometimes brought than Morton. against blondes and blue-eyed beauties,

Henry Morton unites himself with the these attracted more admiration from the Covenanters, and becomes one of their western youth than either the splendour leaders, his associates besides Balfour, of her equipment, or the figure of her being the fanatical preachers, who put palfrey." themselves at the head of the rebels to The following is a humorous account vindicate the cause against the Prelatists, of an old penurious Scotch laird's table upon whom they denounce, and after and family-party dinner about the year execute, the most bloody vengeance. 1680:

economy.

Evandale and others.

person

On the other side, at the head of the royalists, is Colonel Grahame, of Clav- old fashions which were connected with "The Laird of Milnwood kept up all erhouse, afterwards created for his services, Viscount Dundee. At the period custom of his house, as it had been uniIt was, therefore, still the embraced by this story he is the enter-versal in Scotland about fifty years beprising, courageous, and skilful antagonist fore, that the domestics, after having of Balfour and his zeal-blinded friends, placed the dinner on the table, sate down and is supported principally by Lord at the end of the board, and partook of the share which was assigned to them, The of the heroine, Edith Bel- in company with their masters. Upon lenger, is thus spoken of. Her grand- the day, therefore, after Cuddie's arrival, mother, Lady Margaret, is first men- being the third froin the opening of this narrative, old Robin, who was butler, "Near to the enormous leather vehi- valet-de-chambre, footman, gardener, and cle which we have attempted to de- what not, in the house of Milnwood, scribe, vindicating her title to precedence placed on the table an immense charger over the untitled gentry of the country, of broth, thickened with oatmeal and might be seen the sober palfrey of Lady colewort, in which ocean of liquid was Margaret Bellenger, bearing the erect indistinctly discovered, by close observ and primitive form of Lady Margaret ers, two or three short ribs of lean mutherself, decked in those widow's weeds ton sailing to and fro. Two huge baswhich the good lady had never laid aside kets, one of bread made of barley and since the execution of her husband for peas, and one of oat-cakes, flanked this his adherence to Montrose. standing dish. A large boiled salmon

tioned :

"Her grand-daughter, and only would now-a-days have indicated more earthly care, the fair-haired Edith, who liberal house-keeping; but, at that periwas generally allowed to be the prettiest od, it was caught in such plenty in the lass in the Upper Ward, appeared beside considerable rivers in Scotland, that it her aged relative like Spring placed close was generally applied to feed the serto Winter. Her black Spanish jennet, vants, who are said sometimes to have which she managed with great grace, stipulated that they should not be requir her gay riding-dress, and laced side- ed to eat a food so luscious and surfeitsaddle, had been anxiously prepared to ing in its quality above five times a week. set her forth to the best advantage. But The large black-jack, filled with very the clustering profusion of ringlets, which, small beer of Milnwood's own brewing, escaping from under her cap, were only was indulged to the servants at discretion, as were the bannocks, cakes, and broth; but the mutton was reserved for the heads of the family, Mrs. Wilson inclu

The antique coach of the Lord Lieutenant of the county.

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