The Eclectic Magazine of Foreign Literature, Science, and Art, Količina 43

Sprednja platnica
Leavitt, Trow, & Company, 1886
 

Mnenja - Napišite recenzijo

Na običajnih mestih nismo našli nobenih recenzij.

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Priljubljeni odlomki

Stran 153 - The rainbow comes and goes, And lovely is the rose; The moon doth with delight Look round her when the heavens are bare; Waters on a starry night Are beautiful and fair; The sunshine is a glorious birth; But yet I know, where'er I go, That there hath passed away a glory from the earth.
Stran 317 - Self-reverence, self-knowledge, self-control, These three alone lead life to sovereign power. Yet not for power (power of herself Would come uncall'd for) but to live by law, Acting the law we live by without fear; And, because right is right, to follow right Were wisdom in the scorn of consequence.
Stran 110 - They are all gone into the world of light! And I alone sit lingering here; Their very memory is fair and bright, And my sad thoughts doth clear.
Stran 86 - His persons act and speak by the influence of those general passions and principles by which all minds are agitated and the whole system of life is continued in motion.
Stran 130 - When France in wrath her giant-limbs upreared, And with that oath, which smote air, earth, and sea, Stamped her strong foot and said she would be free, Bear witness for me, how I hoped and feared!
Stran 158 - Love had he found in huts where poor Men lie ; His daily Teachers had been Woods and Rills, The silence that is in the starry sky, The sleep that is among the lonely hills.
Stran 341 - The wind, the tempest roaring high, The tumult of a tropic sky, Might well be dangerous food For him, a Youth to whom was given So much of earth — so much of Heaven, And such impetuous blood.
Stran 161 - The loyal to their crown Are loyal to their own far sons, who love Our ocean-empire with her boundless homes For ever-broadening England, and her throne In our vast Orient, and one isle, one isle, That knows not her own greatness: if she knows And dreads it we are fall'n. - But thou, my Queen, Not for itself, but thro...
Stran 163 - England ; and whether, as the Roman in days of old held himself free from indignity when he could say, " Civis Romanus sum," so also a British subject, in whatever land he may be, shall. feel confident that the watchful eye and the strong arm of England will protect him against injustice and wrong.
Stran 159 - Let it flame or fade, and the war roll down like a wind, We have proved we have hearts in a cause, we are noble still, And myself have awaked, as it seems, to the better mind ; It is better to fight for the good, than to rail at the ill ; I have felt with my native land, I am one with my kind, I embrace the purpose of God, and the doom assign'd.

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