The Dutch and Quaker Colonies in America, Količina 2

Sprednja platnica
The Minerva Group, Inc., 2002 - 428 strani
 

Mnenja - Napišite recenzijo

Na običajnih mestih nismo našli nobenih recenzij.

Vsebina

CHAPTER
1
Cartwright sails for England but lands in Spain
7
Unwillingness of New Haven leaders to be annexed to Con
13
The first mail on the American continent monthly between
19
Admiral Evertsens fleet in the West Indies
24
Lovelaces purchases and debts 31
31
The duke sends Edmund Andros to govern New York
37
Andross zeal for municipal improvements
44
The king gends Henry Sloughter to be governor of
198
Trial and sentence of the Leislerites
204
The war with France
210
Fletcher rebukes the assembly
216
The golden age of piracy
222
Strange rumours about Kidd Bellomont goes to Boston
231
The Aristocrats petition the crown
237
Another abortive attempt against Canada
243

Invasions of the Mohawk country by the French 50
50
He organizes a Board of Indian Commissioners
56
War with the Tarratines
59
Approach to New York from the harbour Fort James
63
The Kissing Bridge the Bowery Village
69
They are entertained at Gowanus by Simon de Hart
78
They are charged a high fare for crossing Spuyten Duyvil
84
Rev James Wolley praises the climate of Manhattan 37
88
And West Jersey to Byllinge and his friends
98
Reasons for the prolonged vitality of the persecuting spirit 104
104
Origin of the epithet Quaker
110
It makes trouble for him at home
116
No Cross no Crown
122
The use of you in place of thou says Penn is undemo
129
A meeting on Sunday at the palace emotion of the princess
135
Beginnings of a Quaker colony in West Jersey
141
Affairs in New Jersey
145
Penns claim against the crown
147
Penns humane and reasonable policy
153
Some incorrect impressions regarding the purchase of Indian
160
Penns return to England
166
Final release of the Jerseys 146
170
Meeting of the first assembly in Fort James
171
And sends out Sir Edmund Andros as viceroy
177
Jacob Leisler refuses to pay duties
183
A committee of safety appoints Leisler to be commanderin
189
The duke grants the assembly and sends out Thomas Don
191
The massacre
195
William Bradford and John Peter Zenger their newspapers
249
His peroration
256
KNICKERBOCKER SOCIETY
257
Effects in the city of New York
262
The servants quarters
269
The stoop
275
Dress
281
The negro plot of 1712
288
Hugbsons Tavern and the informer Mary Burton
290
The Maids of Taunton
296
Absurd stories about him
302
Disagreements between Delaware and Pennsylvania
309
Penns wretched son
315
The first schools in Pennsylvania
321
Printing and the Bradfords
322
Andrew Hamiltons tribute to Penn
328
The synagogue in New York
335
Walloon settlements on the Hudson River
341
Jay Laurens and Boudinot
347
Migration of Palatines to New York and Pennsylvania 350
350
SOME LEISLER DOCUMENTS
357
H Dying Speeches of Leisler and Milborne
364
But you cannot hurt us for if God is with us who can
369
CHARTER FOR THE PROVINCE OF PENN
370
Andros asserts sovereignty over East Jersey
390
William Kidd and his commission for arresting pirates 226 227
392
MAPS
395
Avtorske pravice

Druge izdaje - Prikaži vse

Pogosti izrazi in povedi

O avtorju (2002)

John Fiske was born in Hartford, Connecticut on March 30, 1842. After graduating from Harvard Law School in 1865, he opened a law practice in Boston but soon turned to writing. His career as an author began in 1861, with an article on "Mr. Buckle's Fallacies," published in the National Quarterly Review. Since that time he had been a frequent contributor to American and British periodicals. Early in his career Fiske also achieved popularity as a lecturer on history and in his later life was occupied mostly with that field. In 1869 to 1871 he was University lecturer on philosophy at Harvard, in 1870 an instructor in history there, and in 1872 to 1879, assistant librarian. On resigning as librarian in 1879, he was elected as a member of the board of overseers, and at the end of the six year term, was reelected in 1885. Since 1881 he had lectured annually on American history at Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri, and since 1884 had held a professorship of American history there. He lectured on American history at University College, London, in 1879, and at the Royal institution of Great Britain in 1880. A large part of his life had been devoted to the study of history; but at an early age, inquiries into the nature of human evolution led him to carefully study the doctrine of evolution, and it was of this popularization of European evolutionary theory that the public first knew him. Fiske's historical writings include The Critical Period of American History, 1783-1789, The Beginnings of New England, The American Revolution, The Discovery of America, Old Virginia and Her Neighbors, Dutch and Quaker Colonies in America, The Mississippi Valley in the Civil War, and New France and New England. John Fiske died in 1901.

Bibliografski podatki