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Slatenient exhibiting the duties which accrued on merchandise, lonnage,

and light miney; of drawbacks on foreign merchandise, domestic refined sugar, and domestic distilled spirits erported; bounty on salted fish exporled ; allowances 10 vessels employed in the fisheries ; and ex

penses of evullection, during the year ending on the 31st December, 1833. Duties on merchandise ........ ..........

$ 20,810,992 66 Tonnage and Light money.

71,729 43

$20,882,722 09 Drawback on foreign merchandise....... 83,422,979 06 Drawback on domestic refined sugar, and domestic distilled spirits..........

37,603 86 Bounties and allowances...... .........

258,466 83 3,719,049 75 Gross revenue in 1833..

$17,163.672 34 Expenses of collecti 'n.........

1.326,691 13 Nett revenue in 1833.......

$15.836,981 21

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Statement exhibiting the amount of American and Foreign tonnage employed in

the foreign tra le of the United States, during the year ending on the 31.t of

December, 1833.
American tonnage in foreign trade........

Tons, 1,086,861 Foreign do do

520,874 Total tonnage employed in foreign trade in 1833.. Tons, 1.607.735 Proportion of foreign tounage to the whole amount of tonnage employed in the foreign trade of the United States, 32.4 to 100 tons. Statement of the Public Dent on the 1st of January, 1835.

Date of arts con-
Stocks.

When redeemable. Amount.

stituting the stocks Unfunded registered debt,

being claims for services and supplies during the revolutionary war, July 9, 1798 On presentation. $27,437 96 Treasury notes issued during the late war, Feb. 24, 1815 Ditto.

5,975 00 Mississippi stock March 3, 1815

Ditto.

4.320 09

$37 733 05 Amount of ihe deht on ibe Ist of January, 1834, per statem nt,

which accompanied ihe report of the commissioners of the soking fund of the 7th February, 1834,

$6,002,507 98 Deduct amounts paid and to be paid during the present year, viz : The resivilce of the exhanged 40 per cent stock issued under the act of 26th May, 1824

$1,252,625 90 And the residue of the 5 per cent. stock 18sued under the act of 3d March, 1821

4,712,(60 29

$5,964,686 19 On account of the unfunded debt, viz : Of the registered debt

$38 74 Treasury notes

54 00

88 74

5,964,774 93 As above

$37,733

05

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MINT OF THE UNITED STATES The Mint of the United States was established by act of 2d of April 1792, at Philadelphia ; where, in virtue of several acts of Congress, it has ever since continued. Samuel Moore, Director .....................................

•$2000 00 William Findlay, Treasurer........

.............. 1200 00 Ad. Eckfeldi, Cbief Coiner............

1500 00 Jacob Eckfeldt, Assayer..........

1500 00 Joseph Cloud, Melter and Refiner......

........... 1500 00 William Kreass, Engraver......

........... 1200 00 J, S. Benezel, Treasurer's Cierk...

......... 1000 00 OPERATIONS OF THE MINT, IN 1834. The coinage effected witbin that period amounts to $7,388,423 ; comprisiog $3,954,270 in gold coips ; $3,415,002 in silver { $19,151 in cop

per ; aud consisting of 11,637,643 pieces of coin, viz.
Half eagles
732, 169 pieces, making

$3,660,845 Quarter eagles 117,370 do do

293,425 Half dollars 6,412,004 do do

3,206,002 Quarter dollars 286,000 do do

71,500 Dismes 635,000 do

63,500 Half dismes 1,480,000 do do

74,000 Ceots 1,855,100 do do

18,551 Half cents 120,000 do do

600

do

11.637,643

$7,388,423 The deposites of goli within the past year have amounted, un round numbers, 10 $4.389.000 ; of which about $1,067,000 consisted of coins of the United States, issued previously to the act of 28th June, establishing a new ralio of gold 10 silver : about $898,000 were derived from the gold regions of the Unite i States ; $225,000 from Mexico, South Ainerica, and the West Indies ; $2,180,000 from Europe ; $12,000 from Africa : and $9,000 from sources not ascertained. of the amount received from Europe, about four-fifths were in foreign coios.

The coinage of gold under the new ratio commenced on the first day of August, the earliest period permitted by the act. Io anticipation, however, of a change in the legal valuation of gold, it had been considered proper to suspend the coinage of all deposites received after the 1st June. Previously to this period, the sum of 3383,545 had been coined, so that, of the above amount of the gold coinage for the past year, $3,570,725 consist of coins of the new standard. This amount, bowever, is the result of the operations of the mint during only five months of the year, corresponding to an amount, for a full year, of about eight and a fhalf millions in gold. Within the same period, the coinage of silver was regulaily inaintained at the average rate of the whole year, making a general result of both gold and silver corresponding to a yearly coinage of nearly $12,000,000.

The amount of gold in the vaults of the mint on the 1st August was $468,500 ; the amount now remaining in the mint uncoined is $435,000, no part of which was deposited earlier than the 9th December, The amount of silver remaining in our vaults for coinage, is, in round numbers, $475,000 no part of which was deposited earlier than the 20th November.

The amount of silver coined within the past year, it is satisfactory to stale, has exceeded by about a quarter of a million the silver coinage of any previous year; while the gold coinage has exceeded the aggregate coinage of gold during the nine preceding years, from 1825 to 1833, inclusive,

The influx of silver during the past year having very considerably exceeded the amount contemplated in the estimates for the year, occasion

ed during a large portion of that period, an unusual retardation in the delivery nf coins; and the amount of deposites has no donbt been restrained to some extent, by this consideration. The estimate for the current year, it is believed, will cover the power required to meet the whole demand for coinage, in a due proportion of the several denominations of coin.

Annexed is a table exhibiting the amount of gold received from the gold region of the United States, annually, from the year 1824, inclusive. It will be observed that the progressive increase in the amount received from that quarter is less conspicuous within the last year. This results, it is believed, in a very material degree, from the attention which has, during that period, been directed to arrangements for working the veins from whence have been derived those superficial deposites of gold, which, being most obvious, have heretofore attracted the principal regard. Nothing has occurred to weaken the impression before entertained as to the extent and richness of the gold mines of the United States, but much to confirm the confidence before expressed, not merely iu their increasing productiveness, but in their permanency.

Virginia. N. Carolina. S. Carolina. Georgia.

Tenn.

Alabama.

Total.

1824 5,000

5,000 1825 17,000

17,000 1826 20,000

20,000) 1827 21,000

21,000 1828 46,000

46,000 1829 2,500 134,000 3,500

140,000 1830 24,000 204,000 26,000 212,000

466,0001 1831 26,000 294,000 22,000 176,000 1,000 1,000 520,000 1832) 34,000 458,000 45,000 140,000 1,000

678,000 1833 104,000 475,000 66,000 216,000 7,000

868,000 1834 62,000 380,000 38,000 415,000 3,000

898,000 252,500 2,054,000 200,500 1,159,000 12,000 1,0003,679,000

ASSAYS OF FOREIGN COINS. The following are the results of the assays made at the mint of the foreign gold and silver coids, which by the acts of Congress, of the 25th and 28th of June, 1834, have been made a legal tender.

Gold Coins. From the assayer's report, it appears that the gold coins of Great Britain are of the finevess of 21 carats 3 7 8 grains; those of Portugal

and Brazil, 21 carats 3 13-16 grains; those of France, 21 carats 2 14-43 grains ; those of Spain, 20 carats 3 3-8 grains ; and those of Mexico ani Colombia, 20 carats 3 grains.

The value per dwt. of the gold coins of Great Britain, according to the above assays, is 94 69 100 cents; that of the gold come of Portugal and Brazıl, 94 62-100 cents; of the gold coins of France, 93 2 100 cents;

o the gold coins of Spain, 89 84 100 cents; and of the gold coins of Mexico and Colombia, 89 43 100 cevts.

The greatly increased amount of the deposites of gold, under the ratio of gold and silver established by the act of June 28th, has enabled the assayer to determine the average fioeness of the several classes of gold coins above mentioned, with a precision not previously allainable The result indicates that in the valuation thereof, in the act making them a legal tender, thry bave been estimated above the rates respectively due to their actual fineness. Some loss has thence been incurred on deposites at the mint, when those coins had been taken by the depositor at the legal valuation per dwt., and I his loss has occasionally, on large sums, been of very sensible a mount; the difference being on the gold coins of Great Britain, Portugal, and Brazil, about the eighth, and on those of France about the tenth of one per cent.

The gold coins of Great Britain, Portugal, and Brazil, the standard of which, by mint regulations, is the same, should be valued at 94 6-10 cents per dwt. The value of the gold coins of France may be properly estimated at 93 cents per dwt., and those of Spain, Mexico, and Colombia, at 89 4-10 cents.

The gold coins of Spain and the Spanish American States, especially the former, will rarely be brought to the mint in large deposites, since the special demand for those coins in commerce gives them a current value, by tale, very sensibly beyond the intrinsic value due to their fineness.

Silver Coins Spanish dollars, together with those of the Spanish American States enumerated in the act of the 25th June, viz: those of Mexico, Peru, Chili, and Central America, as also those restamped in Brazıl, according to frequent trials thereof, may be regarded as of the weight and fineness coniemplated in the act, viz. of not less weight than four hundred and fifteen grains, and of not less fineness than ten ounces fifteen pennyweights and twelve grains of pure silver in twelve ounces of standard silver.

The tendency of the Mexican dollars of the more recent issues to deviate from their proper standard, which has been noticed in the reports on foreign coins within the last two years, appears equally conspicuous in some of the latest dates. This, however, seems to be almost exclusively confined to the issues of the Provincial mints, and is not in any material degree observable in the coinage executed at the city of Mexico

The irregularity referred to affects very sensibly the interest of the depositor of those coins at the mint, by rendering a less productive re. turn ; their intrinsic value, however, with rare exceptions, is still equal, and slightly superior, to that of the dollar of the United States. No suggestiou is therefore, considered pecessary, in regard to the limitations under which the several classes of dollars enumerated in the act are made a legal tender, by tale, at 100 cents the dollar.

The silver coins of France maintain, by the latest assays, their regular standard of ten ounces sixteen penny weights of pure silver in twelve ounces of standard silver ; their weight also is conformable to that contemplated in the provisions under which they are made a legal tender, by tale, at the rate of 93 cents each.

An Act regulating the value of certain foreign gold coins within the

United States, (SEC 1 ) Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, That, froin and after the thirty-first day of July next, the following gold coins shall pass as curreot as money within the United States, and be receivable in all payments, by weight, for the payment of all debts aud demands, at the rates following, that is to say: the gold coins of Great Britain, Portugal, and Brazil, of not less than twenty-two carats fine, at tbe rate of ninety-four cents and eight-tenths of a cent per pennyweight; the gold coins of France nine-tenths fine, at the rate of ninety-three cents and one-tenth of a cent per pennyweight; and the gold coins of Spain, Mexico, an Colombia, of the fineness of twenty carats three grains and se ven sixteenths of a grain, at the rate of eighty-nine cents and nine-tenths of a cent per pennyweight.

SEC. 2 And be it further enacled, That it shall be the duty of the Secretary of the Treasury to cause assays of the aforesaid gold coins, made current by this act, to be had at the mint of the United States, at least once in every year, and to make a report of the result thereof to Congress.

I Approved, June 28th, 1834 ]

An act regulating the value of certain foreign silver coins within the

United States. (Sec. 1 ] Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, That from and after the passage of this act, the following silver coins shall be of the legal value, and shall pass current as money within the United States, by tale, for the payment of all debts and demaviis, at the rate of one hundred cents the dollar, that is to say: the dollars of Mexico, Peru, Chili, and Central America, of not less weight than four hundred and fifteen grains each, and those re-stamped in Brazil, of the like weight, of oot less fineness than ten ounces fifteen penny weights of pure silver, in the troy pound of twelve ounces of standard silver; and the five franc pieces of France, when of not less fineness than ten ounces and sixteen pennyweights in twelve ounces troy weight of standard silver, and weighing! nut less than three hundred and eighty-four grains each at the rate of ninety three cents each.

SEC. 2. And be il further enacted, That it shall be the duty of the Secretary of the Treasury to cause assays of the aforesaid silver coins, made current by this act, to be had at the miut of tbe United States at least once in every year, and to make report of the result thereof to Congress.

[Approved, June 25th, 1834.]

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