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for the inventor should be printed upon, or affixed to it, in a durable

manner.

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Where the invention is of “a composition of matter," the law requires that the application be accompanied ** with specimens of the ingredients, and of the composition of matter, sufficient in quantity for the purpose of experiment."

OF INTERFERING APPLICATIONS. In case of interfening applications, the same shall be submitted to the arbitration of three persons, one of whom shall be hospp by each of the applicants, and the third person shall be appointed by the Secretary of State ; and the decising or a ward of such arbitrators delivered to the Secretary of State, in writing, and subscribed by them, or any two of them, shall be final as far as respects the granting of the parent. And if either of the applicants shall refuse or fail to choose an arbitrator, the patent shall issue to the opposite party. And where there shall be more than two intertering applications, and the parties applying shall not all unite in appointing three arbitrators, it shall be in the power of the Secretary of State to appoint three arbitrators for the purpose.” (Act of 1793, sec. 9 ]

Before an application can be referred the applicant must have done all which the law requires him to do previously to the issuing of a patent.

FEES PAYABLE IN THE PATENT OFFICE. “Every inventor, before he presents his petition to the Secretary of State, signifying his desire of obtaining a patent, shall pay into the Trea. sury, thiny dollars; and the money thus paid shall be in full for the sundry services to be performed in the office of the Secretary of State.” (Act of 1793, sec 11 )

This requirement of the law will be complied with by a payment made to the Treasurer of the United States, at Washington, or to bis credit in any one of the selected deposite banks. In either case, duplicate receipts must be taken, stating by whom the payment is made, and for what object, one of which receipts must acconipany the petition.

The practice a bich has beretofore existed in some cases, of sending the money to the Secretary of State, or the Superiiendent, is not in conform. ity with the law, and is to be discontinued.

“For every copy which may be required, of any paper respecting any patent that has been granted, the person obtaining such copy shall pay at the rate of twenty cents for every copy sheet of one hundred words, and for every copy of a drawing, the party obtaining the same shall pay two dollars i' (Act of 1793, sec. 11.)

For authenticating a copy of any paper under the seal of the Depart. ment, a fee of twenty-five cents is required by law to be paid. cording of transfers is charged at the same rate with the copying of patents.

The fees for copies of patents, and of papers or drawings relating to them, and for recording transfers, must be paid at the time the copying or recording is orrlered.

OF THE RENEWAL OF PATENTS. The 2d section of the Act of July 3d, 1832, provides, “that application to Congress, to prolong, or renew, the term of a patent, shall be made before its expiration, and shall be notified at least once a month for three mouths, before its presentation, in two newspapers printed in

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the City of Washington, and in one of the newspapers in which the laws of the United States shall be published, in the State or Territory in which the patentee shall reside. The petition shall set forth, particularly, the grounds of the application. It shall be verified by oath; the evidence in its support may be taken before any judge or justice of the peace; it shall be accompanied by a statement of the ascertained value of the discovery, inventivn or improvement, and of the receipts and expenditures of the patentee, so as to exbibit the profit or loss arising therefroin."

Caveats are not recognized by the patent laws of the United States. But papers containing descriptions of discoveries or inventions, claimed as new, inay be filed in the office at any time before an application for a patent is made. They will be so far useful as to show subsequent applicants whether they have been anticipated in their inventions. These papers, when filed, are open to the inspection of the public, in the same manner as those relating to patents.

Patents are issued in the order of time in which the proper documents are received at the Patent Office; but this rule applies only to cases in which the documents are coinplete.

Communications to and froni the Superintendent of the Patent Office, are free of postage; and the petition to the Secretary of State, with the accompanying papers, may be transmitted directly to the Superintendent.

JOHN FORSYTH, Secretary of State.

SINKING FUND. Commissioners of the Sinking Fund, under the Act of 8th July, 1792. Martin Van Buren, Vice President of the United States. John Marshall, Chief Justice of the Supreme Court. Juhn Forsyth, Secretary of State. Levi Woodbury, Secretary of the Treasury. Benjamin F. Butler, Altorney General.

SECRETARY. Asbury Dickins, $250 per annum.

CLAIMS ON FRANCE, Board of Commissioners under the Convention with France, concluded

July 4, 1831. George W. Campbell, of Tennessee,

$3000 00 Jono K. Kane, of Penosylvania,

Commissioners...... 3000 00 Romulus M. Saunders, of N. C.

3000 00) John E. Frost, of District of Columbia, Secretary

.2000 00 John H Wheeler, of North Carolina, Clerk...... ....

. 1500 00 Note.--For the act constituting this Board, see Vol. XI. p. 82.

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An Act to extend the time allowed for the discharge of the duties of the

Commission for carrying into effect the Convention with France.

Be it enacled by the Senale and House of Representatives of the United Siates of America in Congress assembled, That so much of an act en

titled, an act to carry into effect the Convention between the United States and his Majesty the King of the Freoch, concluded at Paris on the fourth day of July, eighteen hundred and thirty-one," approved July thirteenth, eighteen hundred and thirty-two, as limits the duration of the Commission, created by the said act to two years, be, and the same is hereby, repealed, and that a period of three years, conumencing on the first Monday of August, one thousand eight hundred and thirty-two, be allowed for the discharge of the duties prescribed by the said act

[Approved, June 19, 1834.]

CLAIMS ON NAPLES. Board of Commissioners under the Treaty with the King of the Two

Sicilies, concluded October 14, 1832. Wyllys Silliman, of Ohio....

S$3000 00 John R. Livingston, of N. Y. Commissioners...

3000 00 Joseph C. Cabot, ut Mass...:)

3000 00 Thomas Swann, Jr. of District of Columbia, Secretary........ 2000 00 John W. Overton, of District of Columbia, Clerk.....

r. ............ 1500 00)

An Act supplementary to the act entitled" an Act to carry into effect the Conven.

tion between the United States and his Majesty the King of the Two Sicilies, concluded at Nuples on the fourteenth day of October, one thousand eighi hundred and thirty-two."

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, That the further time of six months, in addition to the time specified in the act to which this is a supplement, be, and hereby is, allowed to the Commissioners appointed by the President to execute and complete the duties imposed upon them by the provisions of the aforesaid act, approved on the second day of March, anno domini, eighteen hundred and thirty-three.

[Approved, June 19, 1834.] Note. For the act constituting this Board, and the treaty authorizing it, see Vol. XII. pp. 55, 56.

.........

Commissioners....

PRIVATE LAND CLAIMS. Commissioners for the final adjustment of Land Claims in Missouri,

under the Act of July 9, 1832. R. Conway, Recorder of Land Titles in Missouri... •$1500 00 James S. Mayfield....

S 1500 00 James H. Relfe...

1500 00 This Board was constituted under the provisions of an act of the 9th of July, 1832, and continued by a supplementary act of the 2d of March, 1833; which acts were further continued in force for one year from the first of October, 1834, by a clause in the “act making appropriations for the Civil and Diplomatic expenses of Government for the year 1834;”? approved 27th June, 1834.

Note.-For act of 9th July, 1832, constituting this Board, see Vol. XI. p. 104.

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CONVENTION WITH CHILE.
General Convention of Peace, Amity, Commerce, and Navigation, between the United

States of America and the Republic of Chile, was concluded and signed by their Pleni-
potentiaries, in the City of Santiago, on the sixteenth day of May, in the year of our
Lord one thousaud eight hundred and thirty-two; and an additional and explanatory
Convention was concluded and signed in the same city, by the Plenipotentiaries of the
two parties, on the first day of September, one thousand eight hundred and thirty.
three, and the respective ratifications of the same were exchanged on the twenty-ninth
day of April, one thousand eight hundred and thirty-four, at the City of Washington,
by Louis McLane, Secretary of State of the United States of America, and Manuel
Carvello, Charge d'affaires of the Republic of Chile, near the Government of the United
States, on the part of the respective Governments.

In the name of God, Author and Legislator of the Unirerse. The United States of America, and the republic of Chile, desiring to make firm and lasting the friendship and good understanding which happily prevails between both nations, have resolved to fix, in a manner, clear, distinct, and positive, the rules which shall in future be religiously observed between the one and the other, by means of a treaty or general convention of peace and friendship, commerce and navigation.

For this most desirable object, the President of the United States of America, by and with the advice and consent of the Senale thereof, bas appointed, and conferred full powers on John Hamm, citizen of said States, and their Chargé d'Affaires near the said republic; and his excellency the President of the republic of Chile has appointed Senor Don Andres Bello, a citizen of the said republic.

And the said plenipotentiaries, after having mutually produced and exchanged copies of their full powers, in due and proper form, have agreed upon and concluded the following articles, videlicet:

Art. i. There shall be a persect, firm, and inviolable peace and sincere friendship between the United States of America and the republic of Chile, in all the extent of their possessions and territories, and between their people and citizens respectively, without distinction of pero sons or places.

ART. 11. The United States of America and the republic of Chile, desiring to live in peace and harmony with all the other nations of the earth, by means of a policy frank and equally friendly with all, engage mutually, not to grant any particular favor to other nations in respect to commerce anu navigation, which shall not, imniediately, become common to the other party, who shall enjoy the same freely, if the concession was freely made, or on allowing the same compensation, if the concession was conditional. It is understood, however, that the relations and conventions which now exist, or may hereafter exist, between the republic of Chile and the republic of Bolivia, the federation of the Centre of America, the republic of Colombia, the United States of Mexico, the republic of Peru, or the United Provinces of the Rio de la Plata, shall form exceptions to this article.

ART. III. The citizens of the United States of America may frequent all the coasts and countries of the republic of Chile, and reside and trade there, in all sorts of produce, manufactures, and merchandise, and shall pay no other or greater duties, charges, or fees, whatsoever, than the most favored nation is or shall be obliged to pay ; and they shall enljoy all the rights, privileges, and exemptions in navigation and commerce, which the most favored nations does or shall enjoy, submitting themselves, nevertheless, to the laws, decrees, and usages there established, and to which are submitted the citizens and subjects of the most favored nations.

In like manner the citizens of the republic of Chile may frequent all the coasts and countries of the United States of America, and reside and trade there, in all sorts of produce, manufactures, and merchandise, and shall pay no other or greater duties, charges, or fees, whatsoever, than the most favored pation is or shall be obliged to pay, and tbey shall enjoy all the rights, privileges, and exemptions in commerce and naviga

tion, which the most favored nation does or shall enjny, submitting themselves, nevertheless, to the laws, decrees, and usages, there established, and to which are submitted ihe citizens and subjects of the most favored nations. But it is understood, that this article does not include the coasting trade of either country, the regulation of which is reserved by the parties, respectively, according to their own separate laws.

Art. iv. It is likewise agreed that it shall be wholly free for all merchants, commanders of ships, and other citizens of both countries, to manage, themselves, their own business, in all ports and places subject to the jurisdiction of each other, as well with respect to the consignment aud sale of their goods and merchandise, by wholesale and retail, as with respect to the loading, unloading, and sending off their ships, they

being in all these cases to be treated as citizens of the country in which they reside, or at least to be placed on a footing with the citizens or subjects of the most favored nation.

ART. V The citizens of neither of the contracting parties shall be liable to any embargo, nor be detained with their vessels, cargoes, merchandise, or effects, for any military expedition, nor for any public or private purpose whatever, without allowing to those interested a suffi cient indemnification.

ART. VI. Whenever the citizens of either of the contracting parties shall be forced to seek refuge or asylum in the rivers, bays, ports, or domioions of the other, with their vessels, whether of merchants or of war, public or private, through stress of weather, pursuit of pirates, or enemies, they shall be received and treated with humanity, giving to them all favor and protection for repairing their ships, procuring provisions, and placing themselves in a situation to continue their voyage without obstacle or hindrance of any kind.

Art. vii. All the ships, merchandise and effects belonging to the citi. zens of one of the contracting parties, which may be captured by pirates, whether within the limits of its jurisdiction or on the high seas, and may be carried or found in the rivers, roads, bays, ports, or dominions of the other, shall be delivered up to the owners, they proving in due and proper form their rights before the competent tribunals ; it being well understood, that the claim should be made within the term of one year by the parties themselves, their attorneys, or agents of their respective Govern

ments.

ART. VII. When any vessel belonging to the citizens of either of the contracting parties shall be wrecked, foundered, or suffer any damage on the coasts, or within the dominions of the other, there shall be given to them all assistance and protection, in the same manner which is usual and customary with the vessels of the nation where the damage happens, permitting them to unload the said vessel, if necessary, of its merchan

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