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WAR DEPAR I'MENT. LEWIS CASS, of Obio, Secretary, $6,000 per annum.

The War Department, as organized under the present constitution, was created by act of 716 August, 1789. The Secretary of War, at first, bad the superintendence of naval affairs. On the 30th of April, 1789, however, a separation took place, and a Navy Department was established. The Secretary of War superintends every branch of the military department; and is, by usage, a member of the cabinet. He holds his office at the will of the President. Attached to the liar Department, and under the immediate direction of the Secretary, are, a Requisition Bureau, a Boyuty Land Bureau, a Pension Office, an Office of Indian Affairs, and an Engineer Office, a Topographical Office, an Ordnance Office, an office for the Commissary General of Subsistence, an office for the Clothing Department, a Paymaster General's Office, and a Surgeon General's Office. All these offices, together with the Head Quarters of the Commanding General, (Major General Macomb,) and the Arjutant General's and Quartermaster General's office, are located at Washington. To this Department belongs the erection of all fortifications, making all topographical surveys; surveying and leasing the national lead mines; and the action (under the laws) of intercouise with Indian tribes.

CLERKS IN TI ECRETARY'S OFFICE. DANIEL KURTZ, acting chief clerk......

.............. 2000 00 Cary A. Harris, clerk............

.. 1400 00 John C. Reynolds, clerk....................

1000 00 William Markward, messenger............

650 00 Francis Datcher, assistant messenger......

400 00 CLERK IN THE REQUISITION BUREAU. LAWRENCE L. VAN KLEECK .

.... 1600 00 From this bureau all the requisitions of the War Department are made out on the Treasury, and the salaries and coutiogeocies of the Department are paid.

CLERKS IN THE BOUNTY LAND BURLAU. WILLIAM GORDON, principal..........

........................... 1400 00 Edward Stephens, clerk...

1000 00 The Bounty Land Bureau of the War Department is a bureau in which claims for military bounty lands, originating in the revolutionary and late war, are examined, and from which military bounty Jand war.

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rants issue.

OFFICE OF INDIAN AFFAIRS. ELBERT HERRING, Commissioner ........

3000 00 Daniel Kurts, chief clerk.......

....................................... 1600 00 Hesekiah Miller, clerk................................

... 1400 00 Samuel J. Potts, clerk..........

1000 00 William Ward, clerk.......

............... 100 00 Charles Drane, messenger .......

700 00 This office which had previously been one of the bureaus of the War Department, was created by an act of July 9, 1832, entitled “an act to provide for the appointment of a Commissioner of Indian Affairs, and for other purposes."

This act provides that the Commissioner of Indian Affairs, who shall he appointed by the President and Senate, shall, under the direction of the Secretary of War, and agreeably to such regulations as the President may, from time to time prescribe, have the direction and management of all Indian affairs, and of all matters arising out of Indian relations.

All accounts and vouchers for claims and disbursements connected with Indian affairs must be transmitted to the Commissioner for administrative examination, and by him be passed to the Second Auditor of the Treasury tor settlement.

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PENSION OFFICE. JAMES L, EDWARDS, Com. John D Wilson.....clerk. 1200 00

missioner .............. 2500 00 Nuthun Rice.........cle.k. 1200 00 G.W. Crump, cbief clerk. 1600 00 Willium M Stewart, clerk. 1000 00 French S. Evans.....clerk. 1400 001 aniel I). Addison, clerk. 1000 00 R. Ela...............clerk. 1400 00 George Taylor.. clerk. William S. Allison...clerk. 1400 00 Reuben Burdine.....clerk 1000 00 Henry H. Sy vesler.. clerk 1200 00 Lantl Boyd.. ......cle:k. 800 00 Vinal Luce..........clerk. 1200 OU Erasmus I). Bulluck, clerk 800 00 Daniel Brown......clerk. 1000 001 Jul. Weaver... messenger. 350 00

The Pension Office was created by an ice of Congress, dated March 2, 1833. The claims for pensions had been previously settled by a bureau of the War Department; (see Vol. X. p. 115 ) In the office, as now established, the Commissioner of Pepsions executes, under the direction of the Secretary of War, such duties in relation to the various pension laws, as may be prescribed by the President of the United States.

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OFFICES OF THE GENERAL STAFF OF THE ARMY.

HEAD QUARTERS OF THE ARMY.
Major General Alexander Macomb, General-in-Chief.
Lieutenant Samuel Cooper, Aid de-Camp, 41h drtillery.
Lieutenant Abraham Vao Buien, Aid de Camp, 2d Infantry.

The army of the United States is placed under the coinmand of the
Major General, wio is generaily styled, the General-in-Chief.
His luries comprise the arraugement of the military force in such man-

as to give protection to the maritime frontier and to the interior border. He superintends the recruiting service ; the discipline and police of the army; orders general courts martial, and decides on all cases, except when the life of an officer or soldier is affected, or the commission of an officer. It is his province to see that the laws and regulatious govAno ng the army are enforced, and that justice is done to all concerned. lo his duties he is assisted by the adjutant general, through whose office all order: are issued to the army, and returns of its strength made, as well as the general inilitary correspondence in relation to the details or seryice. He is niso assisted by the two inspectors generals, who, under his orders, inspect the condition of the several regiments, corps, and posts, and inquire minutely into every subject relating to the welfare of the army; and recommend such improvements as may add to the comfort

the officers and men; they also report on the general condition of corps, and tne individual character of its members. The General. in

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Chief has two aides de camp, who assist him in his correspondence, and in the recording of it, and who also perform the dutios of assistant adjutant's general.

There are no clerks attached to the head quarters of the army ; the correspondence and duties being of a delicate and confidential nature, in a great degree, it is entrusted only to those who, by previous education and experience, can properly appreciate and understand its object.

ADJUTANT GENERAL'S OFFICE. Colonel R. Jones, Adjutant General. Lieutenant Lorepzo Thomas, 4th Infantry. Lieutenant James H. Prentis, 1st Artillery. Brooke Williams, clerk..........................................$1150 00 John H. Hepburn, clerk.........

..................... 1000 00 James L. Addison, clerk

800 00 This office is the repository of the records which refer to the personnel of the army, in war, as well as in time of peace, and of the military history of every officer and soldier, from the earliest period of the government, so far as these may have been preserved. It is here where all military appointments and commissions are made out and registered, where the names of all eolisted soldiers are entered, and their size, roll, and enlistments, recorded and filed, &c. It is in this office where the monthly returns of the troops, and muster rolls of companies, required by the 13th and 19th articles of war, are received and preserved ; where the original proceedings of general courts martial are deposited and entered, where the inventory of the effects of deceased officers and soldiers are forwarded and recorded. [90th and 94th articles of war.)

The Adjutant General of the army is charged with the registery of all commissioned officers, and with the distribution of their commissions

with the record of all appointments in the army; promotions, resignations, deaths, Lc. All orders wbich emanate from general head quarters of the army, and all regulations and general orders from the War Office, are communicated to the troops by the Adjutant General.

In this office the annual returns of the militia of the several States and Territories are deposited for safe keeping, as well as arms, munitions, and accoutrements, pertaining to the same, required by law to be made

to the President of the United States The general returns of the militia of the United States, required for the use of Congress, pursuant to the act of March 2, 1803, are consolidated in this office. Here all appointInents and commissions of the officers of the militia of the District of Columbia, are registered aud distributed.

Assistants.

ENGINEER DEPARTMENT. Brevet Brig. Gen. Charles Gratiot, Corps of Engineers, Chief Engineer. Lieutenant R. E. Lee, of the Corps of Engineers, Lieutenant G. W. Cullum, of the Corps of Engineers, Benjamin Fowler, clerk...

.$1150 00 J. C. Wilson, clerk.......

............................................. 1000 00 Willis Fawcett, clerk. ..

800 00 The Chief of the Corps of Engineers is stationed at the seal of goveru

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ment and dirts and regulates the duties of the corps of engineers, and chose s Iso of such of the topographical engineers as may be attached 10

Engineer Department; aut also is the luspector of the Military ibe Acetean, and is charged with its correspondence. surveying for military purposes and for internal improvements, the selec

ories of the Engineer Department comprise-reconnoitering and sites, the formation of plans and estimates, the construction, re

inspection of fortifications, and the disbursements of the sums whose of the Military Academy. Also, the superintendence of the exeapprop.ated for the fulfilineot of ibore objects severally, comprising!

the acts of Congress in relation to internal improvements by roads, canals, the navigation of rivers, and the repairs and improvements the same, which inay be authorized by acts of Congress, with the execuconnected with the harbors of the United States, or the entrance into tron of which the War Department may be charged, lject to be ordered on any duty beyond the line of their immediate pro vated branch of military science, they do not assume, nor are they sub

The function of the engineers being geiierally confined to the most elewhen so arranged to other duties, either on detachment or otherwise, they fession, except by special authority, through the War Department and have precedeuce according to their commissions, which, at all times, entitle them to every mark of military respect.

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TOPOGRAPHICAL BUREAU. Brevet Lt. Col. John J. Abert, l'opographical Engineers, Superintendent. Captain Augustus Canfield, Topographical Engineers, assistant. Lieutenant Washington Hood, 4th Infantry, assistant. Robert Fowler, clerk............

-$800 00 This bureau has charge of all topographical operations and surveys for military purposes, and for purposes of internal improvements, and of all maps, drawings, and documents, in relation to those duties.

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ORDNANCE DEPARTMENT.
George Bomford, Colonel of Ordnance.
William H. Bell, Captain of Ordnance.
William Rindall, clerk....

•$1150 001 A. G. Glynn, clerk....

..............1000 00
George Welsh, clerk................. .......................... 800 00
John Robb, superintendent, Springfield, $100 per. mooth, and 4 rations
C. Howard, storekeeper, Springfield, pay, &c. of captain of infantry.

J. Weatherhead, master arınorer, Springfield, $50 per m. and 2 rations.
George Rust, superintendent, Harper's Ferry, $100 per m. and 4 rations.
D). Bedinger, storekeeper, Harper's Ferry pay, &c. of captain of inf'try
Benjamin Moor, storekeeper, Harper's Ferry, $50 pe, m. and 2 rations.

Adim Hoops, storekeeper........
James R. Butler, storekeeper, Pittsburg ..............
Samuel Perkins, storekeeper, Detroit......
Daviel S. Gaillard, storekeeper, Watervleit, N. Y....

tain of infantry. Roger Alden, storekeeper, West Point, N. Y........

Pay, &c. of capo

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Marcus C Buck, storekeeper, Washington City.....
W. L Poole, storekeeper, Charleston, S. C......... Pay, &c. of cap-
S. H. Webb, storekeeper, New York......

taju of infantry. A. I. Rounfort, storekeeper, Frankford, Peno.......

The Ordnance Department which had been abolished and merged in the Artillery, hy the act of 2d March, 1821, was re-organized under the act of 5th April, 1832, entitled, "an act to provide for the organization of the Orduance Department Uoder this law it consists of one colo. nel, one lieutenant colonel, two majors, and ten captains, and as many enlisted men as the public service may require, not exceeding two hundred and fifty.

It is the duty of the Colonel of the Ordnance Department to direct the inspection and proving of all pieces of ordnance, cannon balls, shot, shells small a rais, side arms and equipments, procured for the use of the army of the Voited States ; and to direct the construction of all cannon and carriages, and every inplement and apparatus for ordnance, and all ammunition wagons, travelling forges, and artificers' wagons; the inspection and proving of powder, and the preparation of all kinds of aminunition and orduance stores. It is also his duty to furnish estimates, under the direction of the Secretary of War, to make contracts and purchases for procuring the necessary supplies of arms, equipments, ordnauce and ordnance stores

The general denoniination of ordnance and ordnance stores comprebeuds all cannon, howitzers, mortars, cannon balls, and shells, for the land service, all gun carriages, caissons, travelling forges and pontoons, with all their equipments, and all other apparatus and machines required for the service and maneuvres of artillery in garrison, sieges, or in the field, together with the materials for their construction and repair. Also, all small arms, side arms and accoutrements for the artillery, cavalry, intantry aud riflemen; all ammunition for cannon and small arms; and all stores of expenditures for the service of the artillery ; materials, utensils and stores for laboratories; all intrenching and miner's tools, for the attack or detence of places; armorer's tools for the repair of arms; and a. tificers' tools of every description, required for the construction or repair of gun carriages and artillery equipments. The ordinary articles of camp equipage, such as axes, spades, shovels, mattocks, &c., are not included.

QUARTERMASTER'S DEPARTMENT.
General Thomas S. Jesup, Quartermaster General.
Major Thomas F. Hunt, 5th infantry, Assistant Quartermaster.

William A. Gordon, clerk.................................... $1150 00
Levin Belt, clerk......

900 001 The Quartermaster General is stationed at the City of Washington, and, under the direction of the Secretary of War, is charged with the military and administrative details of his department. He has a complete administrative control of all the officers belonging to his department, as well as of those appomted to act therein, or make disbursements on account thereof. Officers of regiments and corps, are also subject to a like cootrol, by the Quartermaster General, in regard to every thing real

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