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to her, in consideration of a valuable position, and pursued four miles, with portion of Ohio, afterward called New the loss of about 900 men in killed, Connecticut, or the Connecticut Re- wounded, and missing. The following

It was from that part of the year, the Indians murdered several of present state of Ohio that the legislature the commissioners sent by the United of Connecticut gave the "fire lands,” as States government to treat for peace. they were termed, to the sufferers above Fort Harmer was first occupied in referred to.

1785 by a part of the first regiinent of Under the several inducements above United States troops, under Major John enumerated, the settlement of Ohio be- Doughty, and named after their military gan in the year 1788, since which, its' commander. In the same year, Gen. increase in population and wealth has Benjamin Tupper, of Chesterfield, Mass., been such as may well astonish the was appointed surveyor, under the surworld, while it affords reason for grati- veyor-general of that state, to begin the tude, as well as for self-congratulation, survey of the country northwest of the not only to its inhabitants, but to all Ohio, and went that year as far as Pittsthose who feel a becoming interest in the burgh. The survey was postponed by solid growth of our common country. the hostile movements of the Indian.s.

Early Surveys.--The Great Miami In the following year, he and General river was surveyed for one hundred Israel Putnam (the celebrated revolumiles, in 1751, by Christopher Gist, tionary officer) published an invitation agent of the old English Ohio company; to disbanded soldiers, who had received and the English had a fort, or trading- deeds of land in Ohio in payment of post, on Loramie's creek, forty-seven their services, to proceed with them to miles north of Drayton, which was the Ohio region. “ The Ohio Company taken by the French. In 1778, the was formed, at their proposition; and, Miami valleys were examined by Daniel on the 7th of April, 1788, Gen. Putnam Boone, during his captivity, and by landed at the mouth of the Muskingum, Bowman and Clark, on their military with a party of laborers and artificers, excursions. In 1784, 25, and ’6, the In- and began to make preparations for the dians ceded the regions of the Muskin- first settlement designed by that associgum, Scioto, and Miamis, and the set- ation, at Marietta. tlement was immediately commenced. At that period, the Shawnees were

Benjamin Stiles, of Redstone (now inhabitants of a large part of the best Brownville), Pa., first proposed to John land in the bounds of the present state, Cleves Symmes, of New Jersey, the especially the valleys of Scioto, Miami, joint purchase of a large tract of land and Wabash. Their principal chief was in Ohio, which was afterward made by Cornstalk, who had distinguished himself the latter for himself, and embraced by his faithfulness to our countrymen, by nearly 600,000 acres. Portions having his successful opposition to the league been sold, parties of emigrants left New formed against them by the nations beYork and New Jersey in 1788.

yond to assist the British in the war. Harmer's Expedition.-In 1790, near- In 1794, General Wayne, after many ly twenty persons were killed by the delays, and the erection of several forts, Indians near Cincinnati; and in the au- routed a large force of Indians and Canatumn General Harmer proceeded against dians near Fort Deposite, and after dethe savage enemy, with 320 regulars, stroying the various villages and posi833 Kentucky and Pennsylvania militia, tions of the enemy along the Miami, and 600 volunteers. After a severe loss brought them to consent to a treaty of in an ambush, he returned without ac- peace, which was concluded August 3d, complishing anything important. In 1795. 1791, General St. Clair, with a force of The next settlement after that at Ma2,300 men, was attacked in his camp, rietta, was made at Columbia, six miles fifty miles from the Miami villages, and above Cincinnati, Nov. 16, 1789, by Maafter a severe battle, driven from his jor Stiles and twenty-five others, chiefly

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Scene in the early Settlement of Ohio Adam Poe and Big Foot.

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enibankment, 830 feet by 730, and from curious and wonderful collections of 3 to 7 feet high, with an eastern open- ancient works in the state. The streets ing of 90 feet. It was from 30 to 40 of the town are laid out in curves, corfeet wide at the base, and had evidently responding with the two concentric cirbeen much higher. A raised path led cles of a fine, large, ancient work in from near the opening to the top of a which it is situated. The interior cirflat mound, at some distance beyond cle is 47 rods in diameter, and distant Main street. A similar work, and a from the outer 3 rods, with a ditch besmall circular one, may also be enumer- tween them. The outer wall was of ated; but these were inferior to another clay, which must have been brought oval, 760 feet by 40, lying nearly north from a distance, and was used to make and soyth, with a southern opening, be- bricks in building the town. yond which was a pit 50 feet wide and but one entrance through the walls, and 12 feet in depth. At the corner of that led into a large square, which had Fifth and Mound streets was a mound, seven other openings.

The walls were 35 feet high, and several smaller else- | 20 feet high. Several smaller circles, where, in some of which were found &c., existed in the vicinity. pottery, various shells, &c.

"Fifty-five years ago,” said General The mounds in Ohio form part of the Harrison, in his discourse before the long chain which extends from the mid- historical society of Ohio, "there was dle of New York, southwesterly to the not a Christian inhabitant within the Mississippi, and down its course, as is bounds which now comprise the state of said by some, to Mexico. They are sup- Ohio; and if, a few years anterior to that posed by some writers to mark the prog- period, a traveller had been passing ress of a numerous and partially civi- down the magnificent river which forms lized people, on their gradual retreat our southern boundary, he might not before powerful enemies. Amid abund- have seen, in its whole course of eleven ant materials for general conjectures, hundred miles, a single human being, and with few hints of ar ything positive, certainly not a habitation, nor the vesit is not surprising that a variety of tige of one, calculated for the residence theories should have been proposed, to of man. He might, indeed, have seen account for their existence.

indications that it was not always thus. One cause of this variety of opinions His eye might have rested on some stuhas been the mistakes made by persons pendous mound, or lengthened lines of who have investigated the subject too ramparts, and traverses of earth, still of hastily. The (trave Creek mound, four-considerable elevation, which proved teen miles below Wheeling, about 70 that the country had once been possessed feet high, and 33 rods in circumference by a numerous and laborious people. at the hase, is one of the largest known But he would have seen, also, indubitable to be wholly of artificial origin. A shaft evidences that centuries had passed away was sunk from the top to the bottom, since these remains had been occupied which exposed to view two rude tombs, by those for whose use they had been one a few feet above the other, and each reared.” containing the remains of a human skel- He concluded that their departure eton, several flat stones, and parts of must have been a matter of necessity; decayed logs, with a number of imple- for no people would willingly have ments, or weapons, and ornaments, like abandoned such a country, after a long those often discovered in other mounds. residence, and the labor they had beA small stone, with an inscription re- stowed upon it, ui less, like the Hesembling Runic and some other ancient brews, they fled from a tyrant, or unalphabets, said to have been taken from feeling taskmasters. the place, has recently excited the curi- “If they had been made to yield to a osity of the learned in Europe, as well more numerous, or more gallant people, as in America.

what country had received the fugitives ? At Circleville existed one of the most and what has become of the conquer

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