History of Spanish Literature, Količina 1

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Harper and Brothers, 1854
 

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Stran 19 - Their shields before their breasts, forth at once they go, Their lances in the rest levelled fair and low ; Their banners and their crests waving in a row, Their heads all stooping down towards the saddle bow. The Cid was in the midst, his shout was heard afar, " I am Rui Diaz, the champion of Bivar ; Strike amongst them, gentlemen, for sweet mercies...
Stran 252 - And Castillo, another chronicler, tells us gravely, in 1587, that Philip the Second, when he married Mary of England, only forty years earlier promised that if King Arthur should return to claim the throne he would peaceably yield to that prince all his rights; thus implying, at least in Castillo himself, and probably in many of his readers a full faith in the stories of Arthur and his Round Table.
Stran 215 - World as well as the Old, is unrivalled in richness, in variety, and in picturesque and poetical elements. In truth, the chronicles of no other nation can, on such points, be compared to them ; not even the Portuguese, which approach the nearest in original and early materials; nor the French, which, in Joinville and Froissart, make the highest claims in another direction. For these old Spanish chronicles, whether they have their foundations in truth or in fable, always strike farther down than those...
Stran 21 - Rodivirna to besiege the windmills there ? Does he tax the millers for their toll, or is that practice past ? Will he make a match for his daughters, another like the last?
Stran 512 - Celestina ¡ and some of its sketches are among the most fresh and spirited that can be found in the whole class of prose works of fiction...
Stran 19 - When they wheel'd and turn'd, as many more lay slain, You might see them raise their lances and level them again. There you might see the breastplates, how they were cleft in twain, And many a Moorish shield lie shatter'd on the plain. The pennons that were white mark'd with a crimson stain, The horses running wild whose riders had been slain.
Stran 215 - As we close it up, (he says—speaking of an old chronicle he has been criticizing.) — we should not forget, that the whole series, extending over full two hundred and fifty years, from the time of Alfonso the Wise to the accession of Charles the Fifth, and covering the New World as well as the Old, is unrivalled in richness, in variety, and in picturesque and poetical elements. In truth, the chronicles of no other nation can, on such points, be compared to them ; not even the Portuguese, which...
Stran 254 - ... and seemed so dangerous, that in 1553 they were prohibited from being printed, sold, or read in the American colonies ; and in 1555 the Cortes earnestly asked that the same prohibition might be extended to Spain itself, and that all the extant copies of romances of chivalry might be publicly burned. And finally, half a century later, the happiest work of the greatest genius Spain has produced bears witness on every page to the prevalence of an absolute fanaticism for books of chivalry, and becomes...
Stran 17 - ... admirable. For the story it tells is not only tha*t of the most romantic achievements, attributed to the most romantic hero of Spanish tradition, but it is mingled continually with domestic and personal details, that bring the character of the Cid and his age near to our own sympathies and interests. The very language in which it is told is the language he himself spoke, still only half developed; disencumbering itself with difficulty from the characteristics of the Latin; its new construction...
Stran 15 - ... these characters. It has sometimes been regarded as wholly, or almost wholly, historical. But there is too free and romantic a spirit in it for history. It contains, indeed, few of the bolder fictions found in the subsequent chronicles and in the popular ballads. Still, it is essentially a poem, and in the spirited scenes at the siege of Alcocer and at the Cortes, as well as in those relating to the Counts of Carrion, it is plain that the author felt his license as a poet. In fact, the very marriage...

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