The History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire

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Harper & Bros., 1867 - 677 strani
 

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LibraryThing Review

Uporabnikova ocena  - MarcusBastos - LibraryThing

Examining a period of world (european) history (late antiquity throughout the middle ages) crucial to the understanding of western civilization, this book is a treasure. Edward Gibbon, drawing from ... Celotno mnenje

LibraryThing Review

Uporabnikova ocena  - stillatim - LibraryThing

Hard to know where to begin with this. His much praised style? Sure, it's better than most historians, but it still bears the scars of the eighteenth century in general, and eighteenth century self ... Celotno mnenje

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Stran 16 - His reign is marked by the rare advantage of furnishing very few materials for history; which is, indeed, little more than the register of the crimes, follies, and misfortunes of mankind.
Stran 462 - A victorious, line of march had been prolonged above a thousand miles from the rock of Gibraltar to the banks of the Loire ; the repetition of an equal space would have carried the Saracens to the confines of Poland and the Highlands of Scotland: The Rhine is not more impassable than the Nile or Euphrates, and the Arabian ileet might have sailed without a naval combat into the mouth of the Thames.
Stran 18 - If a man were called to fix the period in the history of the world during which the condition of the human race was most happy and prosperous, he would, without hesitation, name that which elapsed from the death of Domitian to the accession of Commodus. The vast extent of the Roman Empire was governed by absolute power, under the guidance of virtue and wisdom.
Stran 260 - It is a saying worthy of the ferocious pride of Attila, that the grass never grew on the spot where his horse had trod. Yet the savage destroyer undesignedly laid the foundations of a republic which revived, in the feudal state of Europe, the art and spirit of commercial industry. The celebrated name of Venice, or...
Stran 11 - Augustus was sensible that mankind is governed by names; nor was he deceived in his expectation, that the senate and people would submit to slavery, provided they were respectfully assured that they still enjoyed their ancient freedom...
Stran 549 - Cyprus, which might comfort Lusignan for the loss of Palestine. By the command of the Sultan, the churches and fortifications of the Latin cities were demolished ; a motive of avarice or fear still opened the holy sepulchre to some devout and defenceless pilgrims ; and a mournful and solitary silence prevailed along the coast which had so long resounded with the WORLD'S DEBATE *. CHAP.
Stran 320 - THE vain titles of the victories of Justinian are crumbled into dust ; but the name of the legislator is inscribed on a fair and everlasting monument. Under his reign, and by his care, the civil jurisprudence was digested in the immortal works of the CODE, the PANDECTS, and the INSTITUTES :
Stran 440 - The means of persuasion had been tried, the season of forbearance was elapsed, and he was now commanded to propagate his religion by the sword, to destroy the monuments of idolatry, and, without regarding the sanctity of days or months, to pursue the unbelieving nations of the earth.
Stran 235 - In the sack of Rome some rare and extraordinary examples of barbarian virtue have been deservedly applauded. But the holy precincts of the Vatican and the Apostolic churches could receive a very small proportion of the Roman people ; many thousand warriors, more especially of the Huns, who served under the standard of Alaric, were strangers...
Stran 432 - In his early infancy he was deprived of his father, his mother, and his grandfather ; his uncles were strong and numerous; and in the division of the inheritance, the orphan's share was reduced to five camels and an Ethiopian maid-sen-ant.

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