Proceedings of the Liverpool Literary & Philosophical Society, Količine 48–49

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Stran 26 - I can give not what men call love, But wilt thou accept not The worship the heart lifts above And the Heavens reject not, The desire of the moth for the star, Of the night for the morrow, The devotion to something afar From the sphere of our sorrow...
Stran 57 - But now we are delivered from the law, that being dead wherein we were held ; that we should serve in newness of spirit, and not in the oldness of the letter.
Stran 29 - On a poet's lips I slept Dreaming like a love-adept In the sound his breathing kept; Nor seeks nor finds he mortal blisses, But feeds on the aerial kisses Of shapes that haunt thought's wildernesses.
Stran 167 - As long as you have the wisdom to keep the sovereign authority of this country as the sanctuary of liberty, the sacred temple consecrated to our common faith, wherever the chosen race and sons of England worship freedom they will turn their faces towards you.
Stran 60 - Yet nature is made better by no mean But nature makes that mean; so over that art, Which you say adds to nature, is an art That nature makes. You see, sweet maid, we marry A gentler scion to the wildest stock, And make conceive a bark of baser kind By bud of nobler race. This is an art Which does mend nature — change it rather; but The art itself is nature.
Stran 166 - It is besides a very great mistake to imagine, that mankind follow up practically any speculative principle, either of government or of freedom, as far as it will go in argument and logical illation.
Stran 143 - As many more individuals of each species are born than can possibly survive; and as, consequently, there is a frequently recurring struggle for existence, it follows that any being, if it vary however slightly in any manner profitable to itself, under the complex and sometimes varying conditions of life, will have a better chancs of surviving, and thus be naturally selected.
Stran 142 - Philip and Mary, by the grace of God, king and queen of England, France. Naples, Jerusalem, and Ireland ; defenders of the faith ; princes of Spain and Sicily ; archdukes of Austria ; dukes of Milan, Burgundy, and Brabant; counts of Hapsburg, Flanders, and Tyrol.
Stran 30 - All things had put their evil nature off: I cannot tell my joy, when o'er a lake Upon a drooping bough with nightshade twined, I saw two azure halcyons clinging downward And thinning one bright bunch of amber berries...
Stran 12 - neath the blanching sky. Ah, ah me ! what a sound ! What a fragrance sweeps up from a pinion unseen Of a god, or a mortal, or nature between...

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