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A newspaper attack...The Evans affray ... Johnson's A return to drudgery...Forced gaiety... Retreat to the
comment

65 country... The peom of “ Retaliation”...Portrait of

Garrick...of Goldsmith ... of Reynolds... Illness of

CHAP. XXXIX.

the Poet...His death...Grief of his friends...A last

word respecting the Jessamy Bride

73

Boswel! in Holy Week...Dinner at Oglethorpe's...Dinner
at Paoli's... The policy of truth... Goldsmith affects

CHAP. XLV.
independence of royalty ... Paoli's compliment...

Johnson's eulogium on the fiddle... Question about The funeral... The monument...The epitaph...Conclud-

suicide...Boswell's subserviency
66 ing remarks

75

CHAP. XL.

Changes in the Literary Club...Johnson's objection to
Garrick... Election of Boswell

68

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RUMINATING ANIMALS.

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CHAP. I.-A Sketch of the Universe

1

ANIMALS OF THE HORSE KIND

II.-A short Survey of the Globe, from the

light.of Astronomy and Geography...

CHAP. I.-The Horse

3

... 229

II.-The Ass

... III.-A View of the Surface of the Earth

239

6

III.-The Zebra

... IV.-A Review of the different Theories of the

243

Earth

7

... V.--Fossil-shells and other extraneous Fossils 13

BOOK II.

VI – The Internal Structure of the Earth ... 16

... VII.-Caves and Subterraneous Passages that

sink, but not perpendicularly, into the

Chap. I.-Introduction, 246.

Earth

20

VIII.—Mines, Damps, and Mineral Vapours 23

II.—The Cow kind, 248; the Buffalo, 254.

... IX.-Volcanoes and Earthquakes

III.—Animals of the Sheep and Goat kind, 257.

27

... X-Earthquakes

The Sheep, 257; the Goat and its numerous varieties,

32

262; the Gazelle, 267.

XI.—The appearance of Islands and Tracts;

IV.—The Musk Animal

... 273

and of the disappearing of others 39

V.-Auimals of the Deer kind, 275. The

... XII.-Mountains

42

XUI.-- Waters

51

Fallow Deer, 284; the Roebuck, 286 : the Elk, 289; the

Rein-deer, 294.

XIV.—The Origin of Rivers

60

XV.–The Oceau in general; and of its

Saltness

70

BOOK III.

... XVI.—The Tides, Motion, and Currents of

the Sea; with their effects

76

QUADRUPEDS OF THE HOG KIND.

XVII.—The Changes produced by the Sea

Chap. I.-Introduction, 298. The Wild Boar, 209 ;

upon the Earth

83

XVIII.-A Summary Account of the Mecha-

the Hog, 300.

II.-The Peccary or Tajacu

302

nical Properties of the Air

92

III.—The Capibara or Cabiai

304

... XIX.-An Essay towards a Natural History

IV.—The Babyrouessa, or Indian Hog 305

of the Air

96

XX.–Winds, irregular and regular

104

... XXI.—Meteor, and such appearances as

BOOK IV.

result from a Coinbination of the

Elements

113

CARNIVOROUS ANIMALS.

XXII.—The Conclusion

122

Chap. I.-Animals of the Cat kind, 307. The Lion,

PART [I.-ANIMALS.

311; the Tiger, 317; the Panther and the Leopard, 322.

II.—Animals of the Dog kind, 329. The Wolf,

CHAP. I.-A Comparison of Animals with the in-

339; the Fox, 345; the Jackal, 347; the Isatis, 350;

ferior ranks of Creation

125

the Hyæna, 350.

II.-The Generation of Animals

III.—Animals of the Weasel kind, 352. The

129

III.—The Infancy of Man

Ermine, or Stoat, 354; the Ferret, 355; the Polecat,

141

IV.—Puberty

357; the Martin, 358; the Sable, 360; the Ichneumon,

146

V.—The Age of Manhood

149361; the Stinkards, 362; the Genet, 384; the Civet,

VI.-Sleep and Hunger

162 365; the Glutton, 367.

VII.-Seeing

109

VIII.—Hearing

174

BOOK V.

IX.-Smelling, Feeling, and Tasting

179

... X.--Old Age and Death

184

XI.- The Varieties in the Human Race 189

XII.--Monsters

199 CHAP. I.-Introduction, 369. The Hare, 370; the

XIII.-Mummies, Wax-works, &c.

206 Rabbit, 374; the Squirrel, 376; the Flying Squirrel,

XIV.-Animals

212 379; the Marmout, 380; the Agouti, 381; the Paca,

... XV.-Qnadrupeds in general compared to 385; the Guinea Pig, 386.

Man

219

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PART VII.-INSECTS.

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OLIVER GOLDSMITH.

CHAP. I.

His whole income, eked out by the produce of some

fields which he farmed, and of some occasional duties Birth and parentage Characteristics of the Goldsmith race- performed for his wife's uncle, the rector of an adjoining

Poetical birthplace-Goblin house--Scenes of boyhood.-
Lissoy-- Picture of a county purson-Goldsmith's school parishi, did not exceed forty pounds-
mistress-Byrne, the village school-master-Goldsmith's

And passing rich with forty pounds a year.
hornpipe and epigram-Uncle Contarine-School studies
and school sports--Mistakes of a night.

He inhabited an old, half-rustic mansion, that stood on

a rising ground in a rough lonely part of the country, There are few writers for whom the reader feels such overlooking a low tract occasionally Hooded by the river personal kindness as for Oliver Goldsmith, for few love Inny. In this house Goldsmith was born, and it was a so eminently possessed the magic gift of identifying birthplace worthy of a poet ; for, by all accounts, it was themselves with their writings. We read his character baunted ground. A tradition handed down among the in every page, and grow into familiar intimacy with him peighbouring peasantry states that, in alter years, the as we read. The artless benevolence that beams through- house remaining for some time untenanted, went to out his works—the whimsical but amiable views of decay, the root fell in, and it became so lonely and forhuman life and human nature—the unforced humour, lorn as to be a resort for the good people" or fairies, blending so happily with good feeling and good sense, who in Ireland are supposed to delight in old crazy, deand singularly dashed at times with a pleasing melané serted mansions for their midnight revels. All attempts choly-even the very nature of his mellow, and Howing, to repair it were in vain; the fairies batuled stoutly to and softly-tinted style, all seem to bespeak his moral as maintain possession, A buge mis-shapen hobgoblin well as his intellectual qualities, and make us love the used to bestride the house every evening with an imman at the same time that we admire the author. While mense pair of jack-boots, which, in his efforts at hard the productions of writers of loftier pretension and more riding, he would thrust through the root, kicking to sounding names are suffered to moulder on our shelves, pieces all the work of the preceding duy. The house those of Goldsmith are cherished and laid in our was therefore left to its fate, and went to ruin. bosoms. We do not quote them with ostentation, but Such is the popular tradition about Goldsmith's birththey mingle with our winds, sweeten our tempers, and place. About two years after his birth a change came harmonize our thoughts; they put us in good humour over the circumstances of his father. By the death with ourselves and with the world, and in so doing they of his wife's uncle be succeeded to the rectory of Kil. make us happier and better men.

kenny West; and, abandoning the old goblin mansion, An acquaintance with the private biography of Gold- he removed to Lissoy, in the county of Westmeath, smith lets us into the secret of his gifted pages. We where he occupied a furin of seventy acres, situated on there discover them to be little more than transcripts the skirts of that pretty village. of his own heart and picturings of his fortune. There This was the scene of Goldsmith's boyhood—the little he shows bimself the same kind, artless, good-humoured, world whence he drew many of those pictures, rural escursive, sensible, whimsical, intelligent being that he and domestic, whimsical and touching, which abound appears in his writings. Scarcely an adventure or throughout his works, and which appeal so eloquently character is given in his works that may not be traced both to the fancy and to the heart. Lissoy is conti to his own parti-coloured story. Many of his most ludi- dently asserted as the original of his “ Auburn” in the crous scenes and ridiculous incidents have been drawn“eserted Village;" his father's establishment, a mixfrom his own blunders and mischances, and he seems ture of farm and parsonage, furnished hints, it is said, really to have been buffeted into almost every maxim for the rural economy of the Vicar of Wakefield; and imparted by him for the instruction of his reader. his father himself, with his learned simplicity, his guile

Oliver Goldsmith was born on the 10th of November, less wisdom, his amiable piety, and itter iguorance 1728, at the bamlet of Pallas, or Pallasmore, county of the world, has been exquisitely portrayed in the of Lougford, Ireland. He sprang from a respectable, worthy Dr. Primrose. Let us pause for a moment, and but by no means a thrifty stock. Some families seem draw from Goldsmith's writings one or two of those picto inherit kindliness and incompetency, and to hand tures wbich, under feigned names, represent his father down virtue and poverty from generation to generation. and his family, and the happy fireside of his childish Such was the case with the Goldsmiths. They were days. always,” according to their own accounts, “a strange My father,” says the “ Man in Black," who, in some family; they rarely acted like other people; their hearts respects, is a counterpart of Goldsmith himself, “ my were in the right place, but their heads seemed to be father, the younger son of a good family, was possessed doing anything but what they ought."- They were of a small living in the church. His education was remarkable,” says another statement, “ for their worth, above his fortune, and his generosity greater than his but of no cleverness in the ways of the world.” Oliver education. Poor as he was, he had his fatterers poorer Goldsmith will be found faithfully to inherit the virtues than himself: for every dinner he gave them they ro and weaknesses of his race.

turned him an equivalent in praise ; and this was all he His father, the Rev. Charles Goldsmith, with here- wanted. The same ambition that actuates a inonarch ditary improvidence, married when very young and very at the head of his army, influenced my father at the poor, and starved along for several years on a small head uf bis table; he told the story of tlie ivy-tree, and country curacy and the assistance of his wife's friends. that was laughed at; he repeated the jest of the two

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