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It would have done you good to have seen ussome baking bread, others making bean soup and coffee, and cooking bacon. After one day's rest we started for home on the Creek. We were gone on the round trip forty days. We found things all right on the Creek, and those who stayed during our absence were glad to see us back."

The First Legislature of the Territory passed the following resolution commending the services of King Woolsey and his companions in these expeditions:

“Whereas, Since the settlement of this country, the people have suffered in the loss of the lives of some of our most respected citizens; also in loss of stock and other property, and from constant apprehensions of attacks, owing to the frequent raids made by the hostile Indians; and

“Whereas, Lieutenant-Colonel King S. Woolsey has, with great perseverance and personal sacrifice, raised and led against the Apaches, during the present year, three several expeditions, composed of citizen volunteers, who, like their commander, have spent their time and means, and up to this time have been entirely unrecompensed therefor; and

“Whereas, These expeditions have been highly beneficial to the people, not only by taking the lives of numbers of Apaches, and destroying the property and crops in their country, but also by adding largely to the geographical, geological and mineralogical knowledge of the country; therefore,

“Resolved by the Council, the House of Representatives concurring, That the thanks of the Legislative Assembly of the Territory of

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Indians. These Indians would draw rations, and then come down seventy-five or eighty miles and steal our cattle. One time these Indians came down and killed a Mexican herder who was working for my brother-in-law, and tried to run the cattle off, but the cattle turned and ran to the house, and two or three men who were there went out and discovered the Mexican lying dead with arrows in him.

“I was located at Gila Bend, and Sanguinetti, from Yuma, came along with his train, and the Indians took all his mules.

“After they had taken my cattle, we sent word to the soldiers at Burke's Station, Oatman Flat, and got the soldiers to come down, myself and King Woolsey and old man Shepard, who was in the Mexican war. Col. McClave came down in command of twenty-five soldiers. The first night some of the soldiers, raw recruits, saw the smoke of the fires of the Indians on the Harquahala, and some of them took their horses and left. That night the Indians attacked us, and whipped us. The next night we made a rush to get to the Indians, but never reached their fires until after daylight, when they had all left their camps, so we went in search of them. Woolsey and I were ahead of the cavalry, which was kind of giving out, having ridden all night, and we began firing at the bunch, and by the time Col. McClave and his soldiers got up to us, the fight was about over. McClave called Woolsey and me down for being ahead of the soldiers, and also said that we had done pretty darn well. It was the 5th of July and hot, and we were pretty dry and tired. We had used up practically all the water we had with us. We laid down and went to sleep. There was a small bluff or hill there

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Arizona be, and are hereby presented to Lieutenant-Colonel King S. Woolsey, and all of those who, under his guidance, have endured with him so many hardships, and have contributed so much to the safety, knowledge, and general welfare of the people. King S. Woolsey, was, in all respects, a big

He was a typical Westerner, bold, resolute and energetic. A natural leader of men, he was successful, not only in his Indian expeditions, but also in his business enterprises. His activities were known and felt in all parts of the Territory up to the time of his untimely death. Among the early pioneers of Arizona he stands out the most conspicuous figure of them all. He had but little respect for the military as is illustrated by the following account of a fight which he had with the Indians while with Major McClave, in command of a troop of soldiers, as related by William Fourr, one of his companions at that time:

“I was in the Harquahala and other fights with King Woolsey. The renegades would come down from the mountains and steal stock and attack the settlers. In 1868 some renegades came down from the mountains, and stole about two hundred head of my cattle. They had raided King Woolsey's ranch before this and had stolen some two or three thousand dollars' worth of stock. These Indians were Mohave-Apaches. I believe the Government put it that way, but the Indians who took my stock were from the Date Creek reservation. Mr. Buckingham, who was a stage man, had his mules stolen from him, and he afterwards saw one of them on a government team, and the soldiers told him that they had got it from the Indians. These Indians would draw rations, and then come down seventy-five or eighty miles and steal our cattle. One time these Indians came down and killed a Mexican herder who was working for my brother-in-law, and tried to run the cattle off, but the cattle turned and ran to the house, and two or three men who were there went out and discovered the Mexican lying dead with arrows in him.

“I was located at Gila Bend, and Sanguinetti, from Yuma, came along with his train, and the Indians took all his mules.

After they had taken my cattle, we sent word to the soldiers at Burke's Station, Oatman Flat, and got the soldiers to come down, myself and King Woolsey and old man Shepard, who was in the Mexican war. Col. McClave came down in command of twenty-five soldiers. The first night some of the soldiers, raw recruits, saw the smoke of the fires of the Indians on the Harquahala, and some of them took their horses and left. That night the Indians attacked us, and whipped us. The next night we made a rush to get to the Indians, but never reached their fires until after daylight, when they had all left their camps, so we went in search of them. Woolsey and I were ahead of the cavalry, which was kind of giving out, having ridden all night, and we began firing at the bunch, and by the time Col. McClave and his soldiers got up to us, the fight was about over. McClave called Woolsey and me down for being ahead of the soldiers, and also said that we had done pretty darn well. It was the 5th of July and hot, and we were pretty dry and tired. We had used up practically all the water we had with us. We laid down and went to sleep. There was a small bluff or hill there

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