Treaties and Executive Agreements ...: Hearings ...on S. J. Res. 1 ...April 27, 28, 29, May 2, 5, 10, 11, and 12, 1955

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Statements submitted byContinued
148
Frank E Holman former president American Bar Association
190
Charles H McLaughlin department of political science University
196
Clarence Manion former dean Notre Dame Law School 261
207
Mrs James B Patton honorary president general and national chair
224
Membership list of the Minnesota Committee Opposing the Bricker
229
May 17 1955
244
Letter to Hon Estes Kefauver from Hon John W Bricker dated
257
Letter to Hon Estes Kefauver from Hon Herbert Brownell Jr
303
Letter to Hon Estes Kefauver from James Watt manager Wash
309
Illinois
311
Letter to Hon Estes Kefauver from Norman Thomas chairman
317
McKee Pittsburgh Pa
357
Letter to Hon Estes kefauver from Vincent J Kowalewski serretary
379
Codfrey P Sc midt Esq New York N Y 369 Codfrey P Sc midt Esq New York N
381
Report of the United States Council of the International Chamber
388
Thomas J Norton Kansas City Mo submitted by the Committee
395
ExhibitsContinued Page ExhibitsContinued
399
L Call judge of the municipal cout Los Angeles judicial
406
Association of Attorney Generals
420
Jacob k Ja its attornev general of the State of New York
421
Letter dated June 18 1955 from C William ONeill president of
433
Decision Supreme Court of the United States No 28 October Term
448
Edward H Pollaci Jr Richmond Hill Long sland N Y
452
Letter to Hon Estes Kefauver from William L Josslin Esq Port
457
Letter to Hon Estes Kefauver from Dr Stephen Goodyear M D
467
Donald B Cloward New York N Y
476
Letter to Hon Éstes Kefauver from Lester B Orfield professor
477
Letter to Hon Estes Kefauver from Fred G Lehmann Mokena Ill
485
Philip B Perlman former Solicitor General of the United States 231
592
Letter to Hon Estes Kefauver from Miles D Kenneiy of the American
620
The Treaty Power and the Constitution The Case for Amendment
630
Report on treaties formulated in the United Nations submitted by
643
The Increasing Need for a Constitutional Amendment on Treaties
653
A letter to the President from Edward R Stettinius Jr Chairman of
699
Letter to Hon Estes Kefauver from United States Circuit Judge John
705
Mrs Oscar M Ruebhausen director League of Women Voters of
712
Letter to Hon Estes Kefauver from Brunson MacChesney enclosing
723
Periods in Road Transport
778
dustry
795
culture
824
International Labor Conventions Chart of Ratifications May 18 1955 Faces 768
835
Address of His Holiness Pope Pius XII at the audience for the governing
862
Letter dated May 16 1955 to Hon Estes Kefauver from Dr George
868
Letter dated May 18 1955 to Hon Estes Kefauver from Clarence
875
Staterent of Donald R Richberg Esquire Washington D C
881
the State of Delaware subrnitted by Vincent J Kowalewski secretary
901
n ent of J Nicholas Shriver Jr Esq Baltimore Md 907 Staten ent of J Nicholas Shriver Jr Esq Baltimore Md
911
Reprint fron Dickinson Law Review re Bricker armendment submitted
937
Statement of National Community Relations Advisory Council
948
Report of the Federal Legislation Committee of the Bronx County
954
dean the law school University of Notre Dame
961
Statement of Hon Richard L Neuberger a United States Senator from
968
Statement of Americans for Democratic Action
974
Statement of Hugh G Mitchell vice president American Coalition
981
Letter to Hon Harley M Kilgore dated May 27 1955 from Thruston
992
Procedures in foreign countries for applying treaties as internal law
1007

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Stran 606 - The doctrine of the separation of powers was adopted by the Convention of 1787, not to promote efficiency but to preclude the exercise of arbitrary power. The purpose was, not to avoid friction, but, by means of the inevitable friction incident to the distribution of the governmental powers among three departments, to save the people from autocracy.
Stran 127 - Nothing contained in the present Charter shall authorize the United Nations to intervene in matters which are essentially within the domestic jurisdiction of any state or shall require the Members to submit such matters to settlement under the present Charter; but this principle shall not prejudice the application of enforcement measures under Chapter VII.
Stran 619 - The various specialized agencies, established by intergovernmental agreement and having wide international responsibilities, as defined in their basic instruments, in economic, social, cultural, educational, health, and related fields, shall be brought into relationship with the United Nations in accordance with the provisions of Article 63. 2. Such agencies thus brought into relationship with the United Nations are hereinafter referred to as specialized agencies.
Stran 199 - The government of the United States, then, though limited in its powers, is supreme; and its laws, when made in pursuance of the Constitution, form the supreme law of the land, ' ' anything in the Constitution or laws of any State to the contrary notwithstanding.
Stran 603 - ... it would be a dangerous delusion, were a confidence in the men of our choice to silence our fears for the safety of our rights; that confidence is everywhere the parent of despotism; free government is founded in jealousy and not in confidence; it is jealousy and not confidence which prescribes limited constitutions to bind down those whom we are obliged to trust with power...
Stran 415 - To influence, directly or indirectly, the passage or defeat of any legislation by the Congress of the United States.
Stran 139 - In questions of power, then, let no more be heard of confidence in man, but bind him down from mischief by the chains of the Constitution...
Stran 130 - It results that the investment of the federal government with the powers of external sovereignty did not depend upon the affirmative grants of the Constitution. The powers to declare and wage war, to conclude peace, to make treaties, to maintain diplomatic relations with other sovereignties, if they had never been mentioned in the Constitution, would have vested in the federal government as necessary concomitants of nationality.
Stran 566 - A treaty shall become effective as internal law in the United States only through legislation which would be valid in the absence of treaty.
Stran 613 - July 1931 for Limiting the Manufacture and Regulating the Distribution of Narcotic Drugs, as amended by the Protocol signed at Lake Success on 11 December 1946.

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