The Works of Daniel Defoe: The fortunes and misfortunes of the famous Moll Flanders

Sprednja platnica
 

Mnenja - Napišite recenzijo

Na običajnih mestih nismo našli nobenih recenzij.

Druge izdaje - Prikaži vse

Pogosti izrazi in povedi

Priljubljeni odlomki

Stran ix - The Fortunes and Misfortunes of the famous Moll Flanders, etc., who was born in Newgate, and during a life of continued variety, for three-score years, besides her childhood, was twelve years a Whore, five times a Wife (whereof once to her own brother), twelve years a thief, eight years a transported Felon in Virginia, at last grew rich, lived honest, and died a Penitent.
Stran xvii - THE world is so taken up of late with novels and romances, that it will be hard for a private history to be taken for genuine...
Stran 173 - If I had been otherwise, the vice came in always at the door of necessity, not at the door of inclination...
Stran 26 - And if I had known his thoughts, and how hard he thought I would be to be gained, I might have made my own terms with him ; and if I had not capitulated for an immediate marriage, I might for a maintenance till marriage, and might have had what I would...
Stran xvii - It is true that the original of this story is put into new words, and the style of the famous lady we here speak of is a little altered, particularly she is made to tell her own tale in modester words...
Stran xxv - MY true name is so well known in the records or registers at Newgate, and in the Old Bailey, and there are some things of such consequence still depending there, relating to my particular conduct, that it is not to be expected I should set my name or the account of my family to this work...
Stran 269 - I'll show you the way home; the Child had a little Necklace on of Gold Beads, and I had my Eye upon that, and in the dark of the Alley I stoop'd, pretending to mend the Child's Clog that was loose, and took off her Necklace and the Child never felt it, and so led the Child on again: Here, I say, the Devil put me upon killing the Child in the dark Alley, that it might not Cry; but the...
Stran 112 - Hence, child, says she, many a Newgate bird becomes a great man, and we have several Justices of the Peace, officers of the trained bands, and magistrates of the towns they live in, that have been burnt in Burnt in the the hand You need not think such a thing strange, " ' daughter, for some of the best men in the country are burnt in the hand, and they are not ashamed to own it.
Stran 261 - ... wicked life, and sometimes I flattered myself that I had sincerely repented. But there are temptations which it is not in the power of human nature to resist, and few know what would be their case, if driven to the same exigencies. As covetousness is the root of all evil, so poverty is the worst of all snares.
Stran 7 - Now all this while my good old nurse, Mrs. Mayoress, and all the rest of them did not understand me at all, for they meant one sort of thing by the word gentlewoman, and I meant quite another; for alas! all I understood by being a gentlewoman was to be able to work for myself, and get enough to keep me without that terrible bugbear going to service, whereas they meant to live great, rich and high, and I know not what.

Bibliografski podatki