Ireland, India and Nationalism in Nineteenth-Century Literature

Sprednja platnica
Cambridge University Press, 19. apr. 2007
In this innovative study Julia M. Wright addresses rarely asked questions: how and why does one colonized nation write about another? Wright focuses on the way nineteenth-century Irish writers wrote about India, showing how their own experience of colonial subjection and unfulfilled national aspirations informed their work. Their writings express sympathy with the colonised or oppressed people of India in order to unsettle nineteenth-century imperialist stereotypes, and demonstrate their own opposition to the idea and reality of empire. Drawing on Enlightenment philosophy, studies of nationalism, and postcolonial theory, Wright examines fiction by Maria Edgeworth and Lady Morgan, gothic tales by Bram Stoker and Oscar Wilde, poetry by Thomas Moore and others, as well as a wide array of non-fiction prose. In doing so she opens up new avenues in Irish studies and nineteenth-century literature.
 

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Vsebina

The
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The sordid wretch who neer has known
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this Unitedman poet drew so extensively was pervasive enough to
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Empowering the Colonized Nation or Virtue
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Travellers Converts and Demagogues
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erotic and patriotic sentiment in moores lalla rookh
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Sensibility and Colonial Wealth
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was in the civil establishment in India but is saved
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Thwarted Genealogies in
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maccarthys afghanistan
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All Points East
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In his representation of the East End and evocation of
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O avtorju (2007)

Julia M. Wright is Professor of English at Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada.

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