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Inspector-General's Account of the JAMAICA EXPORTS, between the 5th of January, 1787, and

January, 1788, with the Value in Sterling Money, according to the Prices then current at the London Market

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Sugar.

Indigo.

qrs. Ibs.

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10 O

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200

2 0

24 O

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To Great Britain 824,706 2 25 1,890, 540

2,316

606,994 3,706 3 27 1,899,967 27,223 Ireland 6,829 0 106,700

2,800

5,500 400
American States 6,167 0 ol 327,325 1,800 6,450 2,566 o 2
Br. Amer. Colonies 2,822 0 207,660 2,300

110 3 8

1,000
Foreign W. Indies

2,200

=
Africa

8,600
Totals 840,548 2 251 2,543,025 6,416 616,444 16,295 3 91 1,906,467 27,623
(Continued.)

Miscellaneous
Ginger. Cacoa. Tobacco. Mahogany. Logwood. Articles. Total Value.
To what PARTS.
Cwt. qrs. lbs. Cwt.qrs. Ibs. lbs. Tons. Cwt.

Tons.
Value.

ko

d.
To Great-Britain 3,553 2 15 82 315) 18,140 5,783 4 6,701 147,2861.38.40 2,022,814 7 10
Ireland
9180
95 o

25,778 100
American States

60,095 18 0
Br. Amer. Colonies 40

26,538 25
Foreign W. Indies 2 O

355 19 0 Africa

860

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4,816 2 151 82 3.151 18,140 | 5,878 4.

To what PARTS.

Cwt.

339 0

Totals

6,701

2,136,442 17 31

But it must be noted, that a considerable part of the cotton, indigo, tobacco, mahogany, dye-woods, and miscellaneous articles, included in the preceding account, is the produce of the foreign West-Indies imported into Jamaica, partly under the free-port law, and partly in small British vessels employed in a contraband traffic with the Spanish American territories, payment of which is made chiefly in British manufactures and negroes; and considerable quantities of bullion, obtained by the fame means, are annually remitted to Great Britain, of which no precise accounts can be procured.

The General Account of IMPORTS into Jamaica will stand nearly as follows, viz.

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IMPORTS INTO JAMAICA. From Great Britain,

£ s.d. ki so do direct, according

British manu.

factures to a return of the

686,657 2 3 Inspector-General Foreign merfor 1787.

chandise

72,275 31

758,932 54 From Ireland, allowing a moiety of the whole import

to the British West-Indies, consisting of manu. factures and falted provisions to the amount of 350,oool.

175,000 o From Africa, five thousand three hundred and forty

five hegroes, * at 40l. sterling each—(this is wholly

a British trade, carried on in ships from England) 213,800 0 0 From the British Colonies in America, including about

twenty thousand quintals of salted cod from Newfoundland

30,000 0 0 From the United States, Indian corn, wheat, flour,

rice, lumber, staves, &c. imported in British ships 90,000 From Madeira and Teneriffe, in fhips trading circui

tously from Great-Britain, five hụndred pipes of wine, exclusive of wines for re-exportation, at 3ol. Sterling the pipe

15,000 0 0

1,282,732 54

* Being an average of the whole number imported and retained in the island for han years, 1778 to 1787, as returned by the inspector-gencral.

From

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£.

Brought over • 1,282,732 5 4
From the foreign West-Indies, under the free-port law,
&c. calculated on an average of three years

150,000 OO

*

£11,432,732 5 4

585

* From returns of the inspector-general. The following are the particulars for the
year 1787.
Cotton wool

194,000 lbs.
Cacao

64,750 lbs.
Cattle, viz.
Alles

43
Horses

233
Mules
Oxen

243
Sheep

98

1,202 No.
Dying woods

5,677 Tons.
Gumi guaiacum
Hides
Indigo

4,663 lbs.
Malingany

9,993 Planks, Tortoise shell

655 lbs. Dollars

53,350 No.

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79 Barrels. 4,537 No.

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A RETURN of the number of SUGAR PLANTATIONS in the island

of JAMAICA, and the Negro SLAVEs thereon, on the 28th of March, 1789, distinguishing the several Parishes.

County of Middlesex.

No. ofl
Sugar Negroes
Piant. thereon.

Plantations.

TotalNumber
of Negrocs in
each County.

Total of Sugar

Plantations.
Toral ot Ne-

-Sodwa s3018

cd in cultiva| tion of Sugar.),

21

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Parislı of St. Mary 63 12,065
Do. St. Anne

30 4,908 Do. St. John

3,713 Do. St. Dorothy

1,776 Do. St. Tho, in the Vale

33 5,327 Do. Clarendon

56 10,150 Do. Vere

5,279 Do. St. Catharine

3 Total in the County of Middlesex 244 43,626

26

408

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County of Surry.
Parish of St. Andrew 24 3,540
Do. St. George

2,795 Do. Portland

23 | 2,968 Do. Port-Royal

3 Do. St. David

1,890 Do. St.Tho, in the East 83 15,786 Do. Kingston.

Total in the County of Surry 159 27,337

358

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BARBADO E S.

BARBADOES, the most casterly of all the Caribbce islands, subject to Great-Britain, and, according to the best geographers, lying between 59° 50' and 62° 2' of weft longitude, and between 12° 56' and 13° 16' of north latitude. Its extent is not certainly known; the most general opinion is, that it is twenty-five miles from north to south, and fifteen from east to welt; but these mensurations are subject to so many difficulties and uncertainties, that it will perhape convey a more adequate idea of this island to tell the reader, that in reality it does not contain above one hundred and seven thousand acres. The climate is hot but not unwholesome, the heat beiug qualified by sea breezes; and a temperate regimen renders this ifland as safe to live in as any climate south of Great-Britain ; and, according to the opinion of many, as even Great-Britain itself. This island has on its east side two streams that are called rivers, and in the middle is said to have a bituminous spring, which sends forth a liquor like tar, and serves for the same uses as pitch or lamp oil. The island abounds in wells of good water, and has several reservoirs for rain water. Some parts of the soil are said to be hollowed into caves, some of them capable of containing three hundred people, These are imagined to have been the lurking-places of runaway negroes, but may as probably be natural excavations. The woods that formerly grew upon the island have been all cut down, and the ground converted into sugar plantations. When those plantations were first formed, the soil was prodigiously fertile, but has since been worn out, insomuch, that about the year 1730, the planters were obliged to raise cattle for the sake of their dung, by which means the profit of their plantations was reduced to less than a tenth of its usual value. Notwithstanding the smallness of Barbadoes, its foil is different, being in some places sandy and light, and oihers rich, and in others fpungy, but all of it is cultivated according to its proper nature, so that the island presents to the eye the most beautili 2

ful

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