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3. At least 36 units of work must be done in major courses (i.e., in courses designated by the numbers 100–199), in any of the following departments: Agriculture

*Jurisprudence
Anatomy

Latin
Anthropology

Library Science
Architecture

Mathematics
Astronomy

Mechanical and Electrical Engineering
Biochemistry and Pharmacology Mining and Metallurgy
Botany

Music
Celtic

Oriental Languages
Chemistry

Palaeontology
Civil Engineering

Pathology and Bacteriology
Drawing and Art

Philosophy
Economics

Physical Education for Men
Education

Physical Education for Women
English

Physics
Geography

Physiology
Geology and Mineralogy

Political Science
German

Public Speaking
Greek

Romanic Languages
History

Sanskrit
Home Economics

Semitic Languages
Hygiene

Slavic Languages
Irrigation.

Zoology

4. At least 12 of the 36 units resuired under (3) must be taken in the major courses of a single department, exclusive of courses in Library Science, and of courses in the departments of Agriculture, Mechanical Engineering, Mining, Civil Engineering, and Irrigation.

The requirement of 12 units of major courses in one department may be satisfied by completing such portions of the following curricula as fall within the undergraduate division of the College of Letters and Science:

Home Economies: either A (household science) or B (household art).
Public Health: first two years of curriculum A.
Architecture: first two years of professional course.
Jurisprudence: first year of the professional course.i
Medicine: first year of the professional course.†

All requirements for graduation are included under these four heads, but it should be observed:

1. That students who after graduation proceed to the master's degree may find that in certain departments 12 units of major work in the upper

* Not more than twenty-six units of work listed in the professional curriculum in law shall be credited toward a bachelor's degree. The student may en roll for as much more as other regulations permit, but the excess over twenty-six will not be included in his schedule for graduation.

† But during the third or junior year in the College of Letters and Science the student will be expected to complete major courses to the amount, normally, of 18 units.

division are not sufficient to enable them to secure the master's degree in one year.

2. That candidates for honors at graduation may be required by their major department to take as much as 24 units, instead of 12, in major courses of that department.

Candidacy for Honors.-Candidates for honors are those students of the upper division who are recognized by the faculty of Letters and Science as having given evidence of superior scholarship and who are therefore granted special liberty and opportunity, and are given special assistance by the departments in which they do their principal work. The regulations governing candidacy for honors are as follows:

Honorable mention with the junior certificate qualifies a student to become immediately a candidate for honors in the upper division. The list of students who receive honorable mention with the junior certificate is published, and the list is sent to members of the faculty of Letters and Science, and to prospective students of the junior class.

A student whose name appears upon this list, unless he prefer not to enter for honors, should, at the beginning of his junior year, and at the beginning of each half-year thereafter, so long as he remains in the honors group, report immediately to the department of his major work. The department will advise him in the choice of his studies and will specifically approve all courses taken in the department of the student's major.

With the approval of the Committee on Candidates for Honors, a department may allow a student who has received the junior certificate without honorable mention, but whose work in the department has been of high grade, to enter for honors.

After the first half of the junior year the Committee on Candidates for Honors will, upon the recommendation of the several departments, decide what students shall remain in the honors group and what students shall be promoted to the honors group. In determining these matters, the committee will consider not only the student's work in the department of his major but his entire record.

The several departments have full freedom in determining the most efficacious methods for the training of candidates for honors; but no student will be required to take more than 24 units of major work in the department of his major. Departments may offer special honors courses in reading and research, with credit to be determined by the instructors in charge, according to the performance of the individual student, subject to such general restrictions as may be imposed by the department and by the Committee on Courses of Instruction. The work of the student in such an honor course may consist of additional work in connection with regular courses of instruction, or may be independent of such courses.

It will be quite possible, though perhaps not often desirable, for a student who is enrolled as a candidate for honors in one department to be transferred to another. In order to make such a change, it will be necessary for him to secure the consent of the department to which he desires to be transferred. If, therefore, at the beginning of his junior year a student who is eligible for candidacy has not yet finally determined upon his major subject, he should enroll with the department to which he is most inclined at the time, understanding that at the beginning of any subsequent term he may make a change in accordance with the conditions just stated.

At the beginning of each half-year the University publishes a list of all candidates for honors of at least one half-year's standing, together with a statement of their major departments.

Before Commencement, a department satisfies itself by means of a general final examination, or in such other manner as it may deem best, of the fitness of each candidate for honors at graduation. Candidates who, in the judgment of their departments, display marked superiority in their major subject, receive the special distinction of highest honors. The list of students upon whom honors and highest honors are conferred, with mention of their major department, appears in the annual Commencement programme.

Students who satisfy the requirements for graduation with honors are subject to all regulations governing students in the upper division excepting the requirement of two years of residence.

COLLEGE OF COMMERCE

UNDERGRADUATE ('URRICULUM* The course leads to the degree of Bachelor of Science and is mainly devoted to elementary and technical studies as a broad preparation for business life. While some specialization is provided for in the senior year, those who wish to prepare for some particular commercial career are advised to extend their course beyond the usual four years. Courses covering five years have been outlined as a preparation for the work of the Certified Public Accountant, of the Actuary, for the consular service, and for railroading. Graduation from this college requires the completion of 124 units of college credit, of which 64 units constitutes the amount required in the University for the junior certificate.

* Due to the establishment at the University of a unit of the Students' Army Training Corps. the curricula announced in this Circular of Information (and in particular the statements concerning prescribed work in military science and tactics) are subject to revision for the year 1918-19.

The requirements in units for the junior certificate, including the forty-five units for matriculation, are as follows:

12 units

18

English
English expression, Subject A, required without

unit credit. See p. 41.
Foreign languages
Foreign language, Subject B (Greek, Latin, Ger-

man, French, Spanish, or Italian) required
without unit credit. See College of Letters

and Science, Lower Division.
History of Political Science
Geography (Physical and Commercial
Other science
Mathematics-matriculation subjects 2 and 3, and

college course E (or its equivalent) and 2
Economics 1
Military Science, Physical Education, Hygiene
Other subjects

15
6
9

14

6 12

17

Total

109 units

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Concerning the following matters, the regulations of the College of Commerce are identical with those of the College of Letters and Science, as set forth in earlier pages of this circular: method of computing units of credit; surplus matriculation credit; scope of examination tests in subjects A and B; courses which may be credited in satisfaction of degree requirements in natural science. For students who in any half-year complete a five-unit lower division course in foreign language, the prescription in foreign language is reduced by one (1) unit for each five-unit course so taken.

Honorable mention with the junior certificate qualifies a student to become a candidate for honors in the upper division. The list of students who receive honorable mention with the junior certificate is published, and is sent to members of the faculty and to prospective students of the junior class. A student whose name appears upon this list, unless he prefer not to enter for honors, should, at the beginning of his junior year, and at the beginning of each half-year thereafter, so long as he remains in the honor-group, report immediately to the secretary of the department of economics, who will advise him in the choice of his studies and will specifically approve all courses taken in the department.

At least two years of residence are required after receiving the junior certificate. This rule may, in exceptional cases, be set aside; but only

on condition that the student devote more than four years to the completion of the undergraduate curriculum.

The requirements for graduation, in addition to those for the junior certificate, are: Technical subjects

32 units
Commercial Law (Jurisprudence 18, 118)
Electives

18

10

Total

60 units

The technical subjects are distributed as follows:
(a) Eleven units specifically required of all students, namely:
Statistics (Economics 140)

3
Accounting (Economics 14)

3 Economic History (Economics 110)

3 Trade Journals (Economics 127A-127B)

2

(b) Twelve units, covering at least four different subjects in applied economics, other than the above, such as money, banking, insurance, transportation, tariff, finance, labor problems, business organization, etc.

(c) Nine units of advanced work in some one of the subjects begun under provisions (a) and (b) above.

Where the arrangement of courses is such as to make it possible, the additional specific requirements for graduation (in excess of required for the junior certificate) may be satisfied by work done before taking the junior certificate, thus increasing the opportunity for specialized elective work in the upper division.

COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE*

Matriculation Requirement-Group III The College of Agriculture offers a series of subjects which, taken collectively, embrace the whole theory of agriculture and the technique of agricultural practice and investigation. The fundamental studies in English, mathematics, foreign languages, history or economics, and natural sciences, which were not completed in the high school, also such advanced work in these and other branches as the student elects,

* The statements in pp. 51-54 refer to curricula in the College of Agriculture other than that in Forest Utilization. For the curriculum in Forest Utilization see p. 55.

Due to the establishment at the University of a unit of the Students' Army Training Corps, the curricula announced in this Circular of Information (and in particular the statements concerning prescribed work in military science and tacties) are subject to revision for the year 1918-19.

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