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The total output, showing amount and value of this product since the inception of this branch of the mineral industry in California is given in the table which follows:

Year

Tons

Value

Year

Tons

Value

12,000

$18,000

1891 1895 1896 1897 1898 1899 1900 1901 1902 1903 1904 1905

1,530
1,900
3,000
5,000
7,000
10,000
1,000
8,000
7,000
18,000
12,000
15,000

$20,000 1906
47,500 1907
65,000 1908
110,000 1909
154.000 1910
250,000 | 1911

50,000 1912
400.000 1913
50,000 1914
27,000 1915
18,000
22,500 Totals

9,600
7,712
8,125
9,023
7,200
1,861
6,522
5,799

14,400 11,593 11,862 52,887 37,094 24,936 115,396 83,485

157,272

$1.583,653

CHAPTER SEVEN.

MINERAL PRODUCTION OF CALIFORNIA BY

COUNTIES. Introductory.

The state of California includes an area of 155,652 square miles and is divided into fifty-eight counties. Some mineral of commercial value exists in every county, and during 1915 active production was reported to the State Mining Bureau from fifty-six counties of the fifty-eight. In the mountainous portions of the state are found the vein-forming minerals, largely. In the vast desert regions of southeastern California ancient lake beds afford an unlimited supply of saline deposits. Underlying the interior valleys of the central and southern portion of the state are the largest pools of crude oil in the world. Building stones and mineral earths of all descriptions are widely distributed throughout the length and breadth of the state.

Of the first seven counties in point of total output, all but two (Shasta and Amador) owe their position mainly to petroleum. Kern, due to its oil, leads all the others by more than three times the total of Shasta, its nearest competitor. Shasta owes its rank to copper, gold, and zinc; Amador, its place on account of gold. Nineteen counties have each a total in excess of a million dollars.

The counties with their mineral resources, production for 1915, etc., will be considered in detail in this chapter.

Value of California Mineral Production, by County, for 1915, Arranged in the Order

of Their Importance.

County

Value

County

Value

1. Kern 2. Shasta 3. Fresno 4. Orange 5. Los Angeles 6. Amador 7. Santa Barbara 8. Nevada 9. Inyo 10. Yuba 11. San Bernardino 12. Sacramento 13. Calaveras 14. Butte 15. Santa Cruz 16. Solano 17. Riverside 18. Contra Costa 19. Tuolumne 20. Placer 21. Ventura 22. Napa 23. Alameda 24. Plumas 25. Sierra 26. San Benito 27. Santa Clara 28. Siskiyou 29. Trinity 30. El Dorado

$25,335,184 31. Mariposa

8,350,133 32. Humboldt
8,152,300 33. Sonoma
6,617,112 , 34. San Joaquin
4,168,612 | 35. San Luis Obispo.
4,063,762 36. San Diego
3,984,966 | 37. Stanislaus
3,492,946 | 38. Tulare
2,771,042 39. San Mateo
2,862,430 40. Marin
2,674,042 41. Madera
2,562,281 42. San Francisco
2,161,893 | 43. Mono
1,622,245 44. Merced
1,581,531 45. Monterey
1,335,923 46. Imperial
1,349,591 47. Lake
1,309,505 48. Glenn
1,171,438 49. Mendocino

963,860 50. Kings
904,767 51. Colusa
884,221 52. Modoc
861,683 53. Tehama
745,715 54. Del Norte
729,518 55. Yolo
642,065 56. Lassen
635,229 57. Alpine
514,094 58. Sutter
199,511
428,336 Total

$412,326 358,686 276,104 248,394 227,632 211,129 191,771 184,599 177,891 160,528 145,063 128,270 109,425 94,032 84,986 77,433 72,534 46,667 24,536 18,608 16,003 8,681 4,702 4,524 2,040

870

1

$96,663,369

ALAMEDA. Alameda County, while in no sense one of the mining counties” of the state, comes twenty-third on the list with a value of mineral products for 1915 of $861,683, a decrease from the 1914 total, which was $870,427. The mineral resources of this county include asbestos, brick, chromite, clay, coal, lime, magnesite, manganese, pyrite, salt, soapstone, and miscellaneous stone.

Commercial production for 1915 was as follows:

[blocks in formation]

Brick
Limestone
Manganese
Pyrite
Salt
Stone, miscellaneous
Other minerals*

14,841 M.

$132,765

10 tons 319 tons 11,287 tons 103,768 tons

20 3,652 45,148 220,977 457,381

1,740

Total

$861,683

*Includes asbestos, chrome, and pottery clay.

ALPINE Alpine has usually shown a small production of gold and silver, but dropped out of the list of producing counties for 1914 and 1915.

This county lies just south of Lake Tahoe, in the high Sierra Nevada range of mountains. Its area is 776 square miles, containing a population of but 309 persons. Transportation is by wagen or mule back, and facilities in general are lacking to promote development work of any kind.

The mineral resources of this section are varied and the country has not yet been thoroughly prospected. Barium, copper, gold, gypsum, lead, limestone, pyrite, rose quartz, silver, tourmaline, and zinc have been found here to some extent.

AMADOR.

Area: 601 square miles.

Population : 9,086 (1910 census). The value of Amador County's mineral production increased from $3,211,109 in 1914, to $1,063,762, thus taking sixth place on the list of counties in the state as regards total value of mineral substances marketed. The most notable feature of the increase was the wonderful jump made in the gold yield.

Although having an output consisting of 10 different minerals, the leading product, gold, makes up nearly 98 per cent of the entire total. Amador led the state in gold production, in 1915.

The mineral resources of this county are, in the main, as follows: Asbestos, brick, chromite, clay, coal, copper, gold, lime, quartz crystals, glass-sand, sandstone, silver, soapstene, and miscellaneous stone.

Commercial production for 1915 was as follows:

[blocks in formation]

Brick
Clay, pottery
Copper
Gold
Lead
Lime
Silica
Silver
Stone, miscellaneous
Other minerals

4,000 M. 40,156 tons 4,185 lbs.

523 lbs. 1,000 bbls. 1 13,339 tons

$80,000 38,879

732 3,894,125

25 1,200 16,112 20. 109

1,300 10,950

Total

$ 1,063,762

BUTTE.
Area: 1,722 square miles.
Population: 27,301 (1910 census).

Location: North central portion of state. Butte, fourteenth county in California in regard to the value of its mineral output, reported a commercial production of nine mineral substances, having a total value of $1,622,245, as compared with $1,755,315 for 1914. As will be noted in the following tabulation, gold is by far the most important item. Butte stands fifth among the goldproducing counties of the state. Among the mineral resources of this section are asbestos, barytes, chromite, gems, gold, limestone, marble, mineral water, platinum minerals, silver, and miscellaneous stone.

Commercial production for 1915 was as follows:

[blocks in formation]

Area: 1,027 square miles.
Population: 9,171.

Location: East central portion of state-Mother Lode district. Calaveras County reported production of 11 different minerals, valued at $2,161,893, during the year 1915, as compared with the 1914 output, worth $2,068,343. Gold, copper and silver are the chief mineral substances produced. In regard to total value of mineral output Calaveras stands thirteenth among the counties of the state; it is sixth in gold, second in copper, and fourth in silver.

The principal mineral resources developed and undeveloped are: Asbestos, barytes, chromite, clay, copper, fuller's earth, gold, graphite, limestone, magnesite, marble, mineral paint, mineral water, platinum minerals, pyrite, quartz crystals, silver, soapstone, and miscellaneous stone.

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