History of the United States of America, from the Discovery of the Continent, Količina 6

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Unity of the Country 51 The Embarkation of Burgoynes Troops suspended
52
gennes desires a Treaty 56 Boundaries of the Colonies 56 The Fisheries
56
Franklins Reply 61 France avows her Treaties with America 61 Will
64
the Great Seal 468 Distrust of Shelburne in America 468 State of
70
Preference from the United States 69 France asks no Favor 69 Agency
71
CHAPTER XXX
77
France threatened with Bankruptcy 85 Society at Paris and Versailles
85
Austria 89 Policy of Kaunitz 89 Towards Prussia 89 Towards
92
against the Saracens 96 Charlemagne 97 Dispute between Emperor
100
the Thirty Years War 106 After the War 106 German Emigration 107
107
Schiller 112 Niebuhr 113 The Youth of Germany
113
Condemns the British Court 119Predicts American Independence
119
their Declaration of Independence as a Proof that they cannot be subjugated
120
an American Commerce through French Ports 120 Predicts the Bankruptcy
128
rejects the British Conciliatory Acts 133 Will treat only as an Independent
134
Morements of Clinton 139 Lees Retreat 140 Washington orders him to
142
The Senecas and Germain 144 Result for Pennsylvania 145
145
Fox Pownall and Conway for Independence 147 Opinion
154
His desire of Gibraltar 161 Refuses an Alliance with the United
162
Paper Money in the States 166 Regulation of Prices 166
166
of Germain 172 Nothing to be expected of Clinton 172 Confidence of
175
CHAPTER XXXIV
176
His Reception by the Queen 180 His Zeal for America 180 France Impa
181
Pettifogging of Florida Blanca 182 Refusal to acknowledge the United
187
CHAPTER XXXVIII
193
Counter Argument of Vergennes 198 French Minister endeavors to persuade
200
CHAPTER XXXIX
206
itants of Connecticut 210 Tryon recalled to New York 210 Gallant Assault
212
of Pownall 215 American Independence fixed 216 America will establish
219
Firmness of the English King Commons and People 224 English Opinion
225
Neutrals in the Time of Cromwell 230 Recognised in Treaties with Portugal
232
Russia for 1779 238 Intervention of Frederic 238 Empress of Russia
239
Panin to Goertz 240England should lose her Colonies 240 Frederic gives
248
His Code 298 George III 298 Means of bringing Slavery
302
In South Carolina Slavery a Primary Element 307 Georgia 307 Massachu
310
THE COMPLOT OF SIR HENRY CLINTON AND ARNOLD
315
Churches burned 316 Engagement at Connecticut Farms 316 Retreat
321
André on Board the Vulture 324 Interview with Arnold at Smiths
327
CHAPTER XLVIII
334
arate Acts of the States 336 The Claims of Virginia to Lands 336
339
Action of Congress to obtain Men and Money 341 Proposal for a Bank
346
sailles for Aid 350 Washingtons Statement 350 Comparison of France
354
of the Netherlands 360 Conflict between the Stadholder and the Country
360
Confiscation of Goods 366 Capture of Dutch Settlements in South America
366
The French Cabinet accedes to the Request of the United States 371
372
of America on Ireland 378 Irish Volunteers 378 Henry Grattan 379
379
Morgans Illness 387 His Retirement from Active Service
388
can Army at Guilford Courthouse 392 Greenes Masterly Retreat across
394
CHAPTER LIII
400
his wish to transfer the War to the Chesapeake 400 Marches without Orders
401
Marches to Crugers Assistance 405 Greene raises the Siege 405 British
408
detached to Virginia 410 Arrival of Phillips with Reenforcements 410
414
retire to Charleston 419 Causes of Clintons Confused Judgment 419
420
Prophecies to Maurepas and to Vergennes 421 Movements of Washington
422
peake appointed a Rendezvous for the Sea and Land Forces 422 Clinton
428
The Netherlands receive him as American Envoy 433 A Liberal Spirit
435
CHAPTER LVI
441
His Interview with Vergennes 442 Canada 442 Franklin writes to Shel
444
Oswalds Powers delayed 448 Fox quarrels with the Cabinet 448 Death
450
Contides in Franklins Sincerity 455 Sends Full Powers to Oswald 456
456
Sir Guy Carleton supersedes Clinton 460 His Humanity 460 Wayne
462
Jay inflexible 470 Rayneval departs for England 470 Mar
471
His Instructions 477 Arrival of John Adams 477 His Hasty Concession
478
The people of America want a Government
484
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Stran 309 - All men are born free and equal, and have certain natural, essential, and unalienable rights; among which may be reckoned the right of enjoying and defending their lives and liberties; that of acquiring, possessing, and protecting property; in fine, that of seeking and obtaining their safety and happiness.
Stran 311 - ... on spreading the opportunities and advantages of education in the various parts of the country, and among the different orders of the people, it shall be the duty of legislatures and magistrates in all future periods of this commonwealth, to cherish the interests of literature and the sciences, and all seminaries of them, especially the University at Cambridge, public schools and grammar schools in the towns...
Stran 302 - Indeed, I tremble for my country when I reflect that God is just; that his justice cannot sleep forever...
Stran 43 - SIR: — I find myself just able to hold the pen during a few minutes, and take this opportunity of expressing my sincere grief for having done, written, or said anything disagreeable to your Excellency. My career will soon be over, therefore justice and truth prompt me to declare my last sentiments. You are in my eyes the great and good man. May you long enjoy the love, veneration, and esteem of these States, whose liberties you have asserted by your virtues.
Stran 206 - That no man shall be compelled to frequent or support any religious worship, place or ministry whatsoever, nor shall be enforced, restrained, molested, or burthened in his body or goods, nor shall otherwise suffer on account of his religious opinions or belief; but that all men shall be free to profess, and by argument to maintain, their opinions in matters of religion, and that the same shall in no wise diminish, enlarge, or affect their civil capacities.
Stran 302 - Nothing is more certainly written in the book of fate, than that these people are to be free ; nor is it less certain that the two races, equally free, cannot live in the same government.
Stran 206 - ... truth is great and will prevail if left to herself; that she is the proper and sufficient antagonist to error, and has nothing to fear from the conflict, unless by human interposition disarmed of her natural weapons, free argument and debate, errors ceasing to be dangerous when it is permitted freely to contradict them...
Stran 463 - At the same time, in justice to my own feelings, I must add, that no man possesses a more sincere wish to see ample justice done to the army than I do ; and as far as my powers and influence, in a constitutional way. extend, they shall be employed to the utmost of my abilities to effect it, should there be any occasion. Let me conjure yon, then, if you have any regard for your country, concern for yourself, or posterity, or respect for me, to banish these thoughts from your mind, and never communicate,...
Stran 306 - ... hath made of one blood all nations of men for to dwell on the face of the earth...
Stran 53 - You may swell every expense and every effort still more extravagantly; pile and accumulate every assistance you can buy or borrow; traffic and barter with every little pitiful German prince that sells and sends his subjects to the shambles...

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