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Alfred Tennyson (Continued).
MARGARET-
Mary Ann ...

9
The Two Voices-
The Three Voices

50
The Two Voices, as heard by Jones
CENONE-
The New Enone...

16
THE SISTERS-
Matrimonial Expediency...

7
The PALACE OF ART-

“I built myself a high-art pleasure house." 18
"I built my Cole a lordly pleasure house," 1862 145

“I built myself a lordly picture-place,” 1877 ... 146
LADY CLARA VERE DE VERE-

Lady Clara V. de V.
Baron Alfred Vere de Vere

27
Baron Alfred, T. de T.

49
Mrs. Biggs, of Brunswick Square
The Premier's Lament
Captain Falcɔn of the Guards, 1848
The Russian Czar, 1854 ...

148
Rustic Admiration of Lady Clara, 1868

149
Lady Clara in the South, 1870

149
The Vicar's Surplice, 1875

149
Rhyme for Rogers, 1884

166
A Parody Advertisement of Velveteen ...

185
THE MAY QUEEN-

The Biter Bit
The May Queen Corrected, 1879
A Farewell (de to the Brompton Boilers
The “May” of the Queen (Judge May)
The Play King (Henry Irving)
The Opening of the New Law Courts
The Queen of the Fête

19
Election's Eve
“ I'm to be one of the Peers, Vicky"
August the Twelfth, 1869

144
A May Dream of the Female Examination 149
The Dray Queen

150
The May Queen in the Existing Climate

151
The Sight-Seeing Emperor, 1877

152
The Welsher's Lament, 1878

152
The Modern May Queen, 1881

152
The Penge Mystery Trial, 1877

152
The May Exam. (By A. Pennysong)

153
The Premier's Lament, 1884

154
The New Lord Mayor, 1881
The Lord Mayor to the Lady Mayoress, 1884...
The Last Lord Mayor to his Favourite Beadle 155
The Eve of the General Election, 1884

155
A Tory Lord on the Franchise Bill, 1884 155
On a Debate on the Franchise Bill, 1884

155
The Premier to Mrs. Gladstone, 1884 ..

156
The Promise of May, 1882

156
The May Queen of 1879 ...

162
“Awake I must, and early," 1861

186
Baron Honour, 1884

186
THE LOTUS EATERS-
The Whitebait Eaters

8
The Ministers at Greenwich

61
A DREAM OF FAIR WOMEN-
“I read, before I fell into a doze"

8
“Long time I fed my eyes on that strange

scene
A Dream or Queer Women

54
A Dream of Fair Women, and others

55

IO
IO
II
II
I 2

A DREAM OF FAIR WOMEN--

Dreaming, methought I heard the Laureate's
Song'

55
A Dream of Great Players (Lawn Tennis)
The Dream of Unfair Women

181
“You Ask Me WHY, THO' ILL AT EASE”-
The Laureate in Parliament

54
The New Umbrella, 1882

162
“OF OLD Sat FREEDOM ON THE HEIGHTS

“Not Old, Stood Pam Upon the Heights,” 1861 163
TITHONUS--
Parody from “ The World,” 1879

60
Tithonus in Oxford

60
Lord Beaconsfield as Tithonus, 1879

163
LOCKSLEY HALI-
“Cousins, leave me here a little, in Lawn Tennis

15
Bacchanalian Dreamings

15
The Lay of the Lovelorn
Vauxhall

23
Sir Rupert, the Red

24
Cousin Amy's View, 1878

50
Locksley Hall, before he passed his “Smalls

163
Battue Shooting, 1884

164
Granny's House, 1854

177
Codgers' Hall, 1876
GODIVA--
The Modern Lady Godiva

13
Madame Warton as “Godiva,” 1848 ::. 164
THE LORD OF BURLEIGH-
Unfortunate Miss Bailey...

47
Parody in "
Figaro

61
The Lord Burghley, 1884

160
The Faithless Peeler, 1848

161
The Lord of Purleigh to the Land Bill, 1881 161
A Burlington House Ballad, 1884

162
The VOYAGE-
The Excursion Train

61
Parody from “ Kottabos,” 1875...

165
A FAREWELL-

" Flow down, cold Rivulct, to the Sea"
“Bite on, thou Pertinacious Flea"

30
Rise up, cold Reverend, to a See”

30
Ode to Aldgate Pump

"Flow down, false Rivulet, to the Sea”
THE BEGGAR MAID-

The Undergrad.
BREAK, BREAK, Break-
To my Scout

14
The Bather's Dirge

15
The Musical Pitch

15
Tennyson at Billingsgate in 1882

15
Parody from " Snatches of Song”

24
Parody from “Punch's Almanac,” 1884

24
The Unsuccessful Stock Exchange Speculator 60
Hot, Hot, Hot

165
Pelt, Pelt, Pelt

165
Wake, Wake, Wake, 1884

166
To Professor 0. C. Marsh, U.S.

181
ENOCH ARDEN-
Enoch Arden, continued, 1866 ...

166
Enoch's “Hard 'Un”

167
THE BROOK-
The Tinker

30
The Rinker

31
Song of the Irwell

57

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INDEX.

58

168
168
169
169
169
178

...

179
179
179

...

178

52

...

66

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29
29
29
57
58
170
170
170

::::

99

48
48

48

رو ر

174

...

170
181

...

170

31

...

Alfred Tennyson (Continued).
THE BROOK-(Continued).

Keeping Term after Commemoration
The Maiden's Lament, 1874
Flow down, old River, to the Sea
Our River (Old Father Thames), 1884...
The (North) Brook
The Plumber and Builder
On Mr. Gladstone's Visit to Scotland (Liberal

Lyrics, 1884)
The Train ...

The Mill, 1884
THE PRINCESS

The Princess Ida ...
“HOME THEY BROUGHT HER WARRIOR, DEAD".

Home they brought her Lap-dog Dead
“Home they brought her Sailor Son
“Home they brought Montmorres, dead"
“ Home they brought the Gallant Red
“Home they brought the news with dread
“Lay the stern old warrior down,” 1865
“ Home they brought her husband, tight

Home the Worrier' comes ! We read"
TEARS, IDLE TEARS

Peers, Idle Peers, 1868...
Tears, Idle Tears, 1866 ...

(To the Right Hon. Spencer Walpole).
“ ASK ME No More."

To an Importunate Host
THE CHARGE OF THE LIGHT BRIGADE-

Charge of the Light (Irish) Brigade
“The Two Hundred Mechanical Engineers

in Dublin, 1865
The Half Hundred (or Coals)
The Doctor's Heavy Brigade
The Charge of the Black Brigide, 1863
At the Magdalen Ground
Charge of the Fair Brigade
The Charge of the “ Bustle'
On the Six Hundredth Representation of “ Our

Boys " at the Vaudeville Theatre
The Vote of Six Millions...
The Charge of the “Rad” Brigade
A Lay of the Law Courts
The Latest Charge (against Mr. Biggar, M.P.,

for Breach of Promise of Marriage)
The Charge of the Gownsmen at the Anti-

Tobacco Lecture
The Charge of the Light Ballet ...
Tragic Episode in an Omnibus
Michael Drayton on the Battle of Agincourt
The “Light” Cavalier's Charge
The Charge of the Court Brigade, 1874
The Batile of Bartlemy's, 1875 ...
Charge of the Light Brigade at the Alexandra

Palace Banquet, 1875
On the Rink, 1876
“ Half a Duck! Half a Duck!”

“ Half a 1.eague !” (Tea Advertisement)
WELCOME TO ALEXANDRA-
Britannia's Welcome to the Illustrious Stranger,

Ismail Pasha, 1869 ...
On a Statue lo the late John Brown
A Welcome to Alexandra (Palace)
On the Opening of the Alexandra Palace, May,

1875

THE GRANDMOTHER-

Hard Times
Parody in “Snatches of Song

59
“And Willy with Franchise Horn,” 1884

168
IN THE GARDEN AT SWAINSTON-
In the Schools at Oxford

32
THE VICTIM -
The l'ictim

46
The Prophet Enoch, 1860

47
The Higher PANTHEISM --
The Higher Pantheism in a Nutshell

51
The Voice AND THE PEAK-

The Voice and the Pique, 1874
“FlowER IN THE CRANNIED Wall
“ Terrier in my Granny's Hall”

174
IN MEMORIAM-
Richmond, 1856

25
In Immemoriam

29
In Memoriam, £ s. d., Baden-Baden
Punch to Salisbury
The Rinker's Solace
The Lawyer's Soliloquy:

61
“I Hold'this Truth with one who sings

61
Ozokerit

174
In Memoriam Technicam, 1865...
In Memoriam ; a Collie Dog, 1884

186
“Ring Out Wild BELLS TO THE WILD SKY."
Wring out the Clouds,” 1872.

174
Ring out, Glad Bells,” 1876

175
“Ring out Fool's Bells,” 1881

175
“ COME INTO THE GARDEN, MAUD.”

“Nay, I cannot come into the garden just now” 7
Maud in the Garden

25
Anti-Maud

25
The Poet's Birth, a Mystery, 1859

175
Chirrup, chirp, chirp, chirp twitter "

176
Midsummer Madness. –“I am a Hearthrug'
* Birds in St. Stephen's Garden

176
Song by Burne-Jones, Come into my Studio,
Maud,” 1878...

179
Come into The Garden,” Maud (Covent
Garden) 1882

180)
THE IDYLLS OF THE KING-
Voyage de Guillaume (Sept. 1883)

13
The Last Peer, December, 1883

27
Parody of the Morte d'Arthur, by H. Chol.
mondeley-Pennell

32
The Coming K-

33
Vilien

34
Goanveer

34
The Very Last Idyll

44
Sir Tray'; an Arthurian Idyll

44
Sir Eggnogg

45
The Players ; a Lawn Tennisonian Idyll

45
An Idyll of Phatte and Leene, 1873

181
Eustace Green, or the Medicine Bottle...

181
The Passing of M'Arthur, 1881

182
Garnet. (An Idyll of the Queen), 1882

182
Jack Sprat. 1884

182
The Quest of the Holy Poker, 1870

183
Willie ard Minnie, 1876...

183
The Latest Tournament, 1872

183
The Princes' Noses, 1880

183
On the Hill; a Fragment, 1882

183
Tory Revels, 1882

183
London to Leicester ; a Bicycling Idyll, 1882 183
The Lost Tennisiad, 1883

183
The Lay of the Seventh Rournament, 1883 56, 183

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Miscellaneous Parodies on Tennyson.
A Laureate's Log. September, 1883

49
Papa's Theory

57
"The Bugle calls in Bayreuth's Halls.”

57
The Amiable Dun, a Fragment...

61
Early Spring, in an American Paper.

62
“In Hungerford, did some wise man,” 1844 145

Mrs. Henry Fawcett on the Education of Women 150
(.4 propos of a Parody on the Collegiate Examinations of

Female Students. )
“ British Birds," by Mortimer Collins ...

186
Reverend Charles Wolfe.
Tie Burial of Sir JOHN MOORE ...

105
Not a drum was heard, not a funeral nole."
The disputed origin of the Poem

105
“Ni le son du tambour ..ni la marche funèbre
Not a sous had he got, not a guinea or note 107

Not a trap was heard, or a Charley's note" 108
Odle on the Death and Burial of the Constitution, 1832-

“Not a moan was heard-not a funeral note 108
On the threatened Death of John O'Connell 108
“ He looked glum when he heard, by a friendly
note," 1864

109
“Not a laugh was heard, not a joyous note, 109
The Flight of O'Neill, the Invader of Canada... 109
Running him in, by a Good Templar
“Not a hiss was heard, not an angry yell,” 1875
The Burial of the Title “ Queen,” 1876
On the Downfall of the Beaconsfield Govern-

ment, 1880
“Not a hum was heard, not a jubilant note
Not a sigh was heard, not a tear-crop sell
The Burial of the Masher, 1883...
“He felt highly absurd, as he put on his coat
Not a mute vne word at the funeral spoke
A Moonlight Flit ...

140
The Burial of Pantomime, 1846-7

141
The Burial of Philip Van Artevelde (Princess's
Theatre)

141
The Burial of the Bills, 1850

141
A Tale of a Tub

141
The Death of the “Childerses, " 1884

187
The Burial of “ The Season," 1884

187
The Burial of my Fellow Lovlger's Banjo 187
The Fate of General Gordon, 1884

187
One more Victim at Monte Carlo

187
The Burial of the Duke of Wellington

188
The Burial of the Bachelor

188
The Marriage of Sir F. Boore

188
Working Men at the Health Exhibition
The Removal of the House of Lords
The Spinster Househokler Martyr
The Murder of a Beethoven Sonata

189
The Burial of the Pauper...

189
The Fate of the Franchise Bill, 1884

189
The Defeated Cricket Eleven

190
The Marriage of Sir John Smith, 1854 ... 190

IIO
ITO
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113

“THOSE THAT OF LATE HAD FLEETED FAR AND Fast,"
Frefatory Sonnet to the Nineteenth Century.

The Last Hat Left.
“Those low-born cubs who sneaked away so fast” 183
MONTENEGRO-

The City Montenegro, 1880

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188
188
188

THE PROMISE OF MAY-

Reprint of the Play-bill, dated November, 1882 157
Parodies on the Play-bill

159
The Marquis of Queersberry on “ The Promise

of May

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Fellow of the Royal Geographical and Royal Historical Societies;
Author of "The Æsthetic Movement in England,The Poets Laureate of England,"

"A Memoir of George Cruikshank,etc.

INTRODUCTION.

I HAVE, for many years past, been collecting Parodies of the works of the most celebrated

British and American Authors. This I have done, not because I entirely approve of the custom of turning high-class literature into ridicule, but because many of the parodies are in themselves works of considerable literary merit. Moreover, as “ imitation is the sincerest form of fattery,” so does a parody show that its original has acquired a certain celebrity, for no author would waste his time, or his talent, in composing a burlesque of an unknown or obscure poem.

A work devoted to the history of English Parody is not so frivolous as it may appear at first sight. Thackeray wrote many Parodies, so did Sheridan, Fielding, and Dryden, whilst numerous articles on parodies are to be found scattered up and down in odd corners of old magazines and reviews, and a few small books have been written on the topic; but, until now, no attempt has been made to give, in a connected form, a history of parody with examples and explanatory notes.

This, then, is what I propose to do in the following articles, and those who desire to possess a complete set of parodies on any favourite author, would do well to preserve these papers for future reference.

Parody is a form of composition of a somewhat ungracious description, as it owes its very

a existence to the work it caricatures; but it has some beneficial results in drawing our attention to the defects of some authors, whose stilted language, and grandiloquent phrases, have veiled their poverty of ideas, their sham sentiment, and their mawkish affectations.

The first attribute of a parody is that it should present a sharp contrast to its original either in the subject, or treatment of the subject; that if the original should be founded on some lofty theme, the parody may reduce it to a prosaic matter of fact narrative. If, on the other hand, the topic selected be one of every day life, it may be made exceedingly amusing if described in highflown mock heroic diction.

if the original errs in sentimental affectation, so much the better for the parodist. Thus many of Tom Moore's best known songs are mere windy platitudes in very

musical verse, which afford excellent and legitimate materials for ridicule. The nearer the original diction is preserved, and the fewer the alterations needed to produce a totally opposite meaning, or ridiculous contrast, the more complete is the antithesis, the more striking is the parody; take for instance Pope's well-known lines :

“Here shall the Spring its earliest sweets bestow,
Here the first roses of the year shall blow,"'

which, by the alteration of two words only, were thus applied by Miss Katherine Fanshawe to the Regent's Park when it was first opened to the public :

“Here shall the Spring its earliest coughs bestow,
Here the first noses of the year shall blow.''

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In this happy parody we have that "union of remote ideas," which is said, and said truly, to constitute the essence of wit. Even the most serious and religious works have been parodied, and by authors of the highest position. Thus, Luther mimicked the language of the Bible, and both Cavaliers and Puritans railed at each other in Scriptural phraseology. The Church services and Litanies of both the Roman Catholic and Protestant Churches, have served in turn as originals for many bitter satires and lampoons, directed at one time against the Church and the priests, at another time in equally bitter invective against their opponents.

To undertake the composition of parodies, as the word is generally comprehended that is, to make a close imitation of some particular poem, though it should be characteristic of the author --would be at times rather a flat business. Even the Brothers Smith in “Rejected Addresses,” and Professor Aytoun in the “ Bon Gaultier Ballads,” admirable as they were, adhered almost too closely to their selected models; and Phæbe Carey, who has written some of the best American parodies, did the same thing. It is an evidence of a poet's distinct individuality, when he can be amusingly imitated. We can only make those the object of our imitations whose manner, or dialect, stamps itselt so deeply into our minds that a new cast can be taken. But how could one imitate or burlesque Robert Pollok's “Course of Time," or Young's " Night Thoughts, or Blair's " Grave," or any other of those masses of words, which are too ponderous for poetry, and much too respectable for absurdity! Either extreme will do for a parody, excellence or imbecility ; but the original must at least have a distinct and pronounced character.

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Certain well-known poems are so frequently selected as models for parodies that it will only be possible to select a few from the best of them; to re-publish every parody that has appeared on Tennyson's “ Charge of the Light Brigade,” E. A. Poe's “The Raven,” Hamlet's Soliloquy, or Longtellow's " Excelsior," would be a tedious, and almost endless task.

Prose parodies, though less numerous than those in verse, are often far more amusing, and it will be found that Dr. Johnson's ponderous sentences, Carlyle's rugged eloquence, and Dickens's playful humour and tender pathos, lend themselves admirably to parody.

The first portion of this work will be devoted to the parodies themselves, accompanied by short notes sufficient to explain such allusions as may, in time, appear obscure; the second will contain a full bibliographical account of all the principal collection of Parodies, and Works on the subject, such as the “Probationary Odes,” “Hone's Three Trials," " Rejected Addresses," and the

, late M. Octave Delepierre's Essai sur la Parodie. The latter work, which was published by Trübner & Co., in 1870, gave an account of old Greek and Roman, and of modern French and English Parodies. I had the pleasure of supplying M. Delepierre with the materials for his chapter on English Parodies, but, owing to the limited space at his command, he was only able to quote a verse or two of the best parody of each description. My aim will be to give each parody intact, except in the few cases where I have been unable to obtain the author's permission to do so.

WALTER HAMILTON.

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