The Life of George Washington, Količina 2

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Cosimo, Inc., 1. avg. 2005 - 416 strani
Author Washington Irving believed this, his monumental biography of America's first great military hero and president, to be his finest literary achievement. Indeed, it is a masterful work, a superlative life of George Washington, and stood as a definitive text long after its 1860 publication.Volume II explores the early skirmishes of the American Revolution, including the Battle of Long Island and its disastrous aftermath and the famous Christmas morning crossing of the Delaware, as well as Washington's relationship with the Marquis de Lafayette.WASHINGTON IRVING (1783-1859) was born in New York City to Scottish immigrant parents. Considered by some the "Father of American Literature," Irving is best known for his short stories, including "The Legend of Sleepy Hollow" and "Rip Van Winkle," but he also produced an extensive bibliography of essays, poems, travel books, and biographies.

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Conjectures as to the Intentions of the EnemyConsequent Precau
179
CHAPTER XXIX
185
The Enemy Cross the HudsonRetreat of the Garrison from Fort
198
CHAPTER XXX
211
Washington Clotted with Additional Powers Recruitment
222
CHAPTER XXXII
237
Howe Hears of the Affair at TrentonComwallis Sent Back to
244
CHAPTER XXXV
256

CHAPTER XIII
85
Precautions Against ToriesSecret CommitteesDeclaration
94
CHAPTER XVI
100
Southern Cruise of Sir Henry ClintonFortifications at Charleston
108
CHAPTER XIX
121
CHAPTER
134
Long Island in Possession of the EnemyDistressed Situation
139
CHAPTER XXII
146
Fortified Camp at Kings BridgeAmerican and British Lines
152
Lee Expected in CampHis Letter of Advice to the President
164
Army ArrangementsWashington at White PlainsThe Enemy
170
Negotiations for Exchange of PrisonersCase of Colonel Ethan
263
CHAPTER XXXVII
272
Foreign Officers Candidates for Situations in the ArmyDifficulties
282
CHAPTER XL
292
The Highland Passes of the Hudson George Clinton in Com
298
CHAPTER XLII
307
British Invasion from Canada The Plan Composition of
314
Particulars of the EvacuationIndian Scouts in the Vicinity
324
Capture of General PrescottProffered in Exchange for Lee
332
Gates on the Alert for a CommandSchuyler Undermined in Con
340
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Stran 139 - Our situation is truly distressing. The check our detachment sustained on the 27th ultimo has dispirited too great a proportion of our troops and filled their minds with apprehension and despair. The militia, instead of calling forth their utmost efforts to a brave and manly opposition in order to repair our losses, are dismayed, intractable, and impatient to return. Great numbers of them have gone off — in some instances almost by whole regiments, by half ones, and by companies at a time.
Stran 40 - I thought, knowing the ice would not last, a favorable opportunity to make an assault upon the troops in town. I proposed it in council, but behold, though we had been waiting all the year for this favorable event, the enterprise was thought too dangerous. Perhaps it was. Perhaps the irksomeness of my situation led me to undertake more than could be warranted by prudence. I did not think so and I am sure yet that the enterprise, if it had been undertaken with resolution, must have succeeded; without...
Stran 243 - Happy is it for this country," write the committee, " that the general of their forces can safely be intrusted with the most unlimited power, and neither personal security, liberty or property, be in the least degree endangered thereby.
Stran 123 - Be cool, but determined," was the exhortation given to the departing troops. " Do not fire at a distance, but wait the commands of your officers. It is the general's express orders, that if any man attempt to skulk, lie down, or retreat without orders, he be instantly shot down for an example.
Stran 211 - What think you," said Washington ; " if we should retreat to the back parts of Pennsylvania, would the Pennsylvanians support us?" " If the lower counties give up, the back counties will do the same," was the discouraging reply. "We must then retire to Augusta County in Virginia," said Washington. " Numbers will repair to us for safety, and we will try a predatory war. If overpowered, we must cross the Alleghanies.
Stran 222 - Voltaire has remarked that King William never appeared to full advantage but in difficulties and in action; the same remark may be made on General Washington, for the character fits him. There is a natural firmness in some minds which cannot be unlocked by trifles, but which, when unlocked, discovers a cabinet of fortitude...
Stran 197 - This is a most unfortunate affair and has given me great mortification; as we have lost, not only two thousand men, that were there, but a good deal of artillery, and some of the best arms we had. And what adds to my mortification is, that this post, after the last ships went past it, was held contrary to my wishes and opinion, as I conceived it to be a hazardous one...
Stran 16 - Could I have foreseen the difficulties, which have come upon us; could I have known, that such a backwardness would have been discovered in the old soldiers to the service, all the generals upon earth should not have convinced me of the propriety of delaying an attack upon Boston till this time.
Stran 203 - Affairs appear in so important a crisis, that I think even the resolves of the Congress must no longer too nicely weigh with us, We must save the community in spite of the ordinances of the Legislature. There are times when we must commit treason against the laws of the State for the salvation of the State. The present crisis demands this brave, virtuous kind of treason.
Stran 117 - That the troops may have an opportunity of attending public worship, as well as to take some rest after the great fatigue they have gone through, the general, in future, excuses them from fatigue duty on Sundays, except at the ship-yards, or on special occasions, until further orders.

O avtorju (2005)

Washington Irving, one of the first Americans to achieve international recognition as an author, was born in New York City in 1783. His A History of New York, published in 1809 under the name of Diedrich Knickerbocker, was a satirical history of New York that spanned the years from 1609 to 1664. Under another pseudonym, Geoffrey Crayon, he wrote The Sketch-book, which included essays about English folk customs, essays about the American Indian, and the two American stories for which he is most renowned--"The Legend of Sleepy Hollow" and "Rip Van Winkle." Irving served as a member of the U.S. legation in Spain from 1826 to 1829 and as minister to Spain from 1842 to 1846. Following his return to the U.S. in 1846, he began work on a five-volume biography of Washington that was published from 1855-1859. Washington Irving died in 1859 in New York.

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