The Blithedale Romance: The Snow Image and Other Twice -told Tales

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D. McKay, 1894 - 481 strani
 

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Stran 19 - ... of gold and purple. As he looked, Ernest could hardly believe but that a smile beamed over the whole visage, with a radiance still brightening, although without motion of the lips. It was probably the effect of the western sunshine, melting through the thinly diffused vapors that had swept between him and the object that he gazed at.
Stran 10 - Ernest ; a story, not of things that were past, but of what was yet to come ; a story, nevertheless, so very old, that even the Indians, who formerly inhabited this valley, had heard it from their forefathers, to whom, as they affirmed, it had been murmured by the mountain streams, and whispered by the wind among the tree-tops. The purport was, that, at some future day, a child should be born hereabouts, who was destined to become the greatest and noblest personage of his time, and whose countenance,...
Stran 10 - But others, who had seen more of the world — had watched and waited till they were weary and had beheld no man with such a face, nor any man that proved to be much greater or nobler than his neighbors — concluded it to be nothing but an idle tale. At all events, the great man of the prophecy had not yet appeared. "Oh, Mother, dear Mother!" cried Ernest, clapping his hands above his head, "I do hope that I shall live to see him...
Stran 76 - I remember you now," muttered Ethan Brand to the showman. " Ah, Captain," whispered the Jew of Nuremburg, with a dark smile, " I find it to be a heavy matter in my show-box, — this Unpardonable Sin ! By my faith, Captain, it has wearied my shoulders this long day, to carry it over the mountain." " Peace," answered Ethan Brand, sternly, " or get thee into the furnace yonder ! " The Jew's exhibition had scarcely concluded, when a great, elderly dog, — who seemed to be his own master, as no person...
Stran 24 - Unsought for, undesired, had come the fame which so many seek, and made him known in the great world, beyond the limits of the valley in which he had dwelt so quietly. College professors, and even the active men of cities, came from far to see and converse with Ernest; for the report had gone abroad that this simple husbandman had ideas unlike those of other men, not gained from books, but of a higher tone,—a tranquil and familiar majesty, as if he had been talking with the angels as his daily...
Stran 28 - ... dreams, because I have lived — and that, too, by my own choice — among poor and mean realities. Sometimes even — shall I dare to say it ? — I lack faith in the grandeur, the beauty, and the goodness, which my own works are said to have made more evident in nature and in human life. Why, then, pure seeker of the good and true, shouldst thou hope to find me, in yonder image of the divine?
Stran 185 - Toil will never come here," said he; "for he hates to see people taking their ease." But, even while he spoke, Daffydowndilly's eyes fell upon a person who seemed the laziest, and heaviest, and most torpid, of all those lazy, and heavy, and torpid people, who had lain down to sleep in the shade. Who should it be, again, but the very image of Mr. Toil! "There is a large family of these Toils,
Stran 199 - One side of the face blazed an intense red, while the other was black as midnight, the division line being in the broad bridge of the nose ; and a mouth which seemed to extend from ear to ear was black or red, in contrast to the color of the cheek. The effect was as if two individual devils, a fiend of fire and a fiend of darkness, had united themselves to form this infernal visage. The stranger grinned in Robin's face, muffled his partycolored features, and was out of sight in a moment. " Strange...
Stran 8 - The Great Stone Face, then, was a work of Nature in her mood of majestic playfulness, formed on the perpendicular Bide of a mountain by some immense rocks which had been thrown together in such a position as, when viewed at a proper distance, precisely to resemble the features of the human countenance.
Stran 81 - Every dwelling was distinctly visible; the little spires of the two churches pointed upward, and caught a fore-glimmering of brightness from the sun-gilt skies upon their gilded weathercocks. The tavern was astir, and the figure of the old, smoke-dried stage-agent, cigar in mouth, was seen beneath the stoop. Old Graylock was glorified with a golden cloud upon his head. Scattered, likewise, over the breasts of the surrounding mountains, there were heaps of hoary mist, in fantastic shapes, some of...

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