Paradise Lost: A Poem, in Twelve Books. The Author John Milton. From the Text of Thomas Newton D.D.

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John Baskerville, 1759 - 416 strani
 

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Stran vi - What recks it them? What need they? They are sped; And when they list, their lean and flashy songs Grate on their scrannel pipes of wretched straw ; The hungry sheep look up and are not fed, But swoln with wind and the rank mist they draw, Rot inwardly and foul contagion spread; Besides what the grim wolf with privy paw Daily devours apace, and nothing said. But that two-handed engine at the door Stands ready to smite once and smite no more.
Stran 80 - Flowers worthy of Paradise, which not nice Art In beds and curious knots, but Nature boon Pour'd forth profuse on hill, and dale, and plain...
Stran 168 - Urania, and fit audience find, though few. But drive far off the barbarous dissonance Of Bacchus and his revellers, the race Of that wild rout that tore the Thracian bard In Rhodope, where woods and rocks had ears To rapture, till the savage clamour drown'd Both harp and voice ; nor could the Muse defend Her son.
Stran 8 - Thus Satan talking to his nearest mate With head uplift above the wave, and eyes That sparkling blazed; his other parts besides Prone on the flood, extended long and large, Lay floating many a rood ; in bulk as huge As whom the fables name of monstrous size, Titanian, or Earth-born, that warr'd on Jove ; Briareos or Typhon, whom the den By ancient Tarsus held ; or that seabeast Leviathan, which God of all his works Created hugest that swim the ocean stream...
Stran 52 - Those other two equalled with me in fate, So were I equalled with them in renown, Blind Thamyris and blind Maeonides, And Tiresias and Phineus, prophets old. Then feed on thoughts, that voluntary move Harmonious numbers; as the wakeful bird Sings darkling, and in shadiest covert hid Tunes her nocturnal note.
Stran 101 - Fairest of stars, last in the train of night, If better thou belong not to the dawn, Sure pledge of day, that crown'st the smiling morn With thy bright circlet, praise Him in thy sphere, While day arises, that sweet hour of prime.
Stran 80 - Which from his darksome passage now appears; And now, divided into four main streams, Runs diverse, wandering many a famous realm And country, whereof here needs no account...
Stran 89 - Unargued I obey, so GOD ordains; GOD is thy law, thou mine; to know no more Is woman's happiest knowledge and her praise.
Stran 197 - Eve ; heaven is for thee too high To know what passes there ; be lowly wise : Think only what concerns thee and thy being ; Dream not of other worlds, what creatures there Live, in what state, condition, or degree, Contented that thus far hath been reveal'd Not of earth only, but of highest heaven...
Stran 208 - She disappear'd, and left me dark: I wak'd To find her, or for ever to deplore Her loss, and other pleasures all abjure...

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