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San Diego.

Area: 4,221 square miles.
Population: 140,000 (estimate by Chamber of Commerce, 1913).

Location: Extreme southwest corner of State. San Diego, first in California in the production of gem stones, ranks thirtieth in the total value of its mineral output. This figure for 1914 equaled $315,267, as compared to the 1913 output, worth $315,694. Aside from minerals commercially produced, as shown below, San Diego County contains deposits of asbestos, bismuth, lithia mica, marble, potash, soapstone, and tungsten.

Commercial production for 1914 was as follows:

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Area: 43 square miles.

Population : 527,000 (estimated by Chamber of Commerce, 1915). Surprising as it may appear at first glance, San Francisco County is listed among the mineral producing sections of the State, actual production consisting of crushed rock, sand, and gravel. Small quantities of various valuable mineral substances are found here, including cinnabar, gypsum, lignite and magnesite, none, however, in paying quantities.

In forty-first place, commercial production for 1914 was as follows:

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San Joaquin.

Area: 1,448 square miles.
Population: 50,731 (1910 census).

Location: Central portion of State. San Joaquin County reported a mineral production for the year 1914 having a total value of $129,930, as compared with the 1913 output, worth $165,157. Comparatively few mineral substances are found here, the chief ones being brick, clay, infusorial earth, manganese, natural gas, glass-sand, and stone industry.

In fortieth place, commercial production for 1914 was as follows:

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San Luis Obispo.

Area: 3,334 square miles.
Population: 19,383 (1910 census).
Location: Bordered by Kern County on the east and the Pacific

Ocean on the west. The total value of the mineral production of San Luis Obispo County in 1914 was $63,465, as compared with the 1913 output, worth $63,675. Among its mineral resources, both developed and undeveloped, are: Asphalt, bituminous rock, brick, chromite, coal, copper, gold, gypsum, infusorial earth, limestone, marble, mineral water, onyx, petroleum, quicksilver, silver, and stone industry.

In forty-fifth place, commercial production for 1914 was as follows:

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San Mateo.

Area: 447 square miles.
Population: 37,500 (estimate by county board of supervisors,

1913).
Location: Peninsula, adjoined by San Francisco on the north.

San Mateo's most important mineral products are limestone and salt, the latter being derived by evaporation from the waters of San Francisco Bay. The total value of all mineral production during 1914 equaled $246,478, as compared with the 1913 figures of $215,371.

Small amounts of barytes, chromite, infusorial earth and quicksilver have been discovered in addition to the items of economic value noted below.

In thirty-second place, commercial production for 1914 was as follows:

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Santa Barbara.

Area: 2,740 square miles.
Population: 27,738 (1910 census).
Location: Southwestern portion of State, joining San Luis Obispo

on the south. Santa Barbara County owes its position as ninth in the State in regard to its mineral product to the presence of productive oil fields within its boundaries. The total value of its mineral production during the year 1914 was $2,686,309, as compared with the 1913 output of $3,636,288.

Aside from the mineral substances listed below, Santa Barbara County contains asphalt, diatomaceous earth, gilsonite, gypsum, magnesite, and quicksilver in more or less abundance.

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Area: 1,328 square miles.
Population: 97,039 (estimate by Chamber of Commerce, 1913).

Location: West central portion of State. Santa Clara County reported a mineral output for 1914 of $266,956, as compared with the 1913 figures of $311,383. This county, lying largely in the Coast Range of mountains, contains a wide variety of mineral substances, including brick, clay, limestone, magnesite, manganese, mineral water, petroleum, quicksilver, soapstone, and the stone industry. It stood second in quicksilver yield for the year.

In thirty-first place, commercial production for 1914 was as follows:

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Area: 435 square miles.
Population: 26,140 (1910 census).
Location: Bordering Pacific Ocean, just south of San Mateo

County. The mineral output of Santa Cruz County, a portion of which is itemized below, amounted to a total value of $1,642,958, giving the county a standing of fifteenth among all others in the State in this regard.

Among the mineral resources known here are bituminous rock, cement, coal, graphite, gold, lime, limestone, petroleum, silver, and the stone industry.

Commercial production for 1914 was as follows:

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Area: 3,858 square miles.
Population: 18,920 (1910 census).

Location: North central portion of State. Shasta County stands fourth in California among the mineral-producing counties, with an output valued at $5,044,930, as compared with the 1913 production, worth $6,212,344. Not taking petroleum into account, Shasta leads all the counties by a wide margin. This county is first in copper production, first in silver, first in pyrite, and seventh in gold. The Shasta copper belt is the most important deposit of this metal on the Pacific coast, and the present production would be practically doubled were it not for the conflict between the agricultural interests and the smelters regarding the alleged damage done to crops by the smelter fumes. Some of the smelters have been closed by injunction and others have been forced to curtail their output in the effort to render their gaseous waste innocuous.

Shasta's leading mineral resources are: Asbestos, barytes, brick, chrome, copper, gold, iron, lead, lime, limestone, mineral water, pyrite, silver, stone industry, and zinc.

Mount Lassen is located in southeastern Shasta County.

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