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Napa.

Area: 783 square miles.
Population: 19,800 (1910 census).
Location: Directly north of San Francisco Bay-one of the “bay

counties." Napa, because of its production of structural and industrial materials, stands twenty-second on the list of mineral-producing counties in California. Its most important mineral resources are asbestos, barytes, copper, cement, gypsum, magnesite, mineral water, quicksilver, sandstone, soapstone, and stone industry.

Commercial production for 1914 was as follows:

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Nevada.

Area: 974 square miles.
Population: 14,955 (1910 census).

Location: North of Lake Tahoe, on the eastern border of the State. Nevada, one of the mountain counties of California, leads all others in its gold output for 1914, and stands sixth on the list in regard to the value of its total mineral output with a figure of $3,329,179, as compared with the 1913 production, worth $2,950,367.

While this county actually produces little else in the mineral line aside from gold and silver, its resources cover a wide scope, including antimony, asbestos, barytes, bismuth, chromite, clay, copper, gems, iron, lead, magnesite, mineral paint, pyrite, soapstone, and tungsten.

Commercial production for 1914 was as follows:

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Orange,

Area: 795 square miles.
Population: 34,436 (1910 census).

Location: Southwestern portion of State, bordering Pacific Ocean. Orange County is one of the many in California which on casual inspection appears to be anything but a mineral-producing section. It stands, however, as the second county in the State in regard to the total value of mineral output, its highly productive oil fields making such a condition possible.

This county made a tremendous gain in 1914, with a total value of mineral products of $8,831,763, over the 1913 output, worth $6,948,495.

Aside from the substances actually produced and noted in the table below, coal, gypsum, iron, infusorial earth, sandstone, and tourmaline have been found in Orange County.

Commercial production for 1914 was as follows:

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Area: 1,395 square miles.
Population: 18,237 (1910 census).

Location: Eastern border of State, directly west of Lake Tahoe. While standing only nineteenth on the list of mineral-producing counties, Placer contains a wide variety of mineral substances which have never been commercially exploited. Its leading products are gold, granite, and limestone. Other mineral resources, many of them undeveloped, are: Asbestos, brick, chromite, clay, coal, copper, gems, gold, iron, lead, limestone, magnesite, manganese, marble, quartz crystals, glass-sand, silver, soapstone, and the stone industry.

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Area: 2,594 square miles.
Population: 5,259 (1910 census).

Location: Northeastern border of State, south of Lassen. A considerable portion of the area of Plumas County lies in the high mountains, and deposits of the metals, especially gold and copper, are found here. Lack of transportation and other facilities have retarded its growth, but its future is decidedly promising. Mineral production for 1914 was valued at $164,809, as compared with the 1913 output, worth $143,698.

Among its mineral resources are: Chromite, copper, gold, granite, iron, lead, limestone, manganese, platinum minerals, silver, tungsten, and zinc.

In thirty-seventh place, commercial production for 1914 was as follows:

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Riverside.

Area: 7,240 square miles.
Population: 34,696 (1910 census).

Location: Southern portion of State. Riverside is the fourth county in the State in size and the seventeenth in regard to the total value of mineral output for 1914. Within its borders are included mountain, desert and agricultural land. Its

mineral resources include metals, structural and industrial materials, and salines, some of the more important being asbestos, borax, brick, cement, clay, coal, copper, gems, gold, graphite, gypsum, iron, lead, limestone, magnesite, marble, mineral paint, mineral water, nitre, salt, glass-sand, soapstone, silver, stone industry, and tin.

Commercial production for 1914 was as follows:

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Sacramento.

Area: 983 square miles.
Population: 90,000 (estimate of Chamber of Commerce, 1913).

Location: North central portion of State. Sacramento stands tenth among the counties of the State as a mineral producer, the output, principally gold, for 1914 being valued at $2,632,658, as compared with the 1913 production, worth $2,925,706. In regard to gold output alone this county ranks fourth, being exceeded only by Nevada, Amador, and Yuba counties. Its mineral resources include: Brick, clay, gold, natural gas, platinum, silver, and the stone industry.

Commercial production for 1914 was as follows:

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San Benito.

Area: 1,392 square miles.
Population: 8,041 (1910 census).

Location: West central portion of State. Although twenty-seventh among the counties of the State in regard to value of total mineral production, San Benito leads in one important branch of the mineral industry, namely, quicksilver production.

Its other mineral resources, many of them undeveloped, include: Antimony, bituminous rock, chromite, coal, gypsum, gems, limestone, mineral water, soapstone, and the stone industry.

Commercial production for 1914 was as follows:

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San Bernardino.

Area: 20,157 square miles.
Population: 75,000 (estimated by board of supervisors, 1913).

Location: Southeastern portion of State. San Bernardino, by far the largest county in the State, ranks sixteenth as regards the value of its mineral output for 1914, with a total of $1,614,606. This county, consisting largely of mountain and desert country, is highly mineralized, a few of the more important mineral resources being: Asbestos, barytes, borax, brick, cement, clay, copper, gems, gold, gypsum, iron, lead, limestone, marble, mineral paint, mineral water, nitre, potash, salt, glass-sand, silver, soapstone, soda, stone industry, tungsten, tuff, vanadium, and zinc.

Commercial production for 1914 was as follows:

Substance

Amount

Value

25 M 19,069 lbs.

Brick
Copper
Gold
Gypsum
Lead
Lime
Limestone
Mineral paint
Mineral water
Miscellaneous stone
Salt
Sand, glass
Silver
Other minerals

$1,250

17,332 tons
45,110 lbs.
84,637 bbls.
23,006 tons

80 tons
44,200 gals.

2,536 205,000 49,150

1,759 93,100 20,880

561 5,100 131,978 2,892

400 40,000 1,060,000

482 tons
140 tons

Total

$1,614,606

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