Rudiments of English Composition

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Oliver & Boyd, 1854 - 134 strani
 

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Stran 98 - Why hast thou then broken down her hedges, so that all they which pass by the way do pluck her? The boar out of the wood doth waste it, and the wild beast of the field doth devour it.
Stran 102 - Alas, poor Yorick! I knew him, Horatio; a fellow of infinite jest, of most excellent fancy. He hath borne me on his back a thousand times. And now how abhorred in my imagination it is! My gorge rises at it. Here hung those lips that I have kissed I know not how oft.
Stran 22 - All our conduct towards men should be influenced by this important precept " Do unto others as you would that others should do unto you.
Stran 51 - A brute arrives at a point of perfection that he can never pass : in a few years he has all the endowments he is capable of; and were he to live ten thousand more, would be the same thing he is at present.
Stran 55 - But most by numbers judge a poet's song, And smooth or rough with them is right or wrong . In the bright Muse though thousand charms conspire, Her voice is all these tuneful fools admire...
Stran 103 - And I will make thy seed as the dust of the earth : so that if a man can number the dust of the earth, then shall thy seed also be numbered.
Stran 56 - Tis hard to say, if greater want of skill Appear in writing or in judging ill ; But, of the two, less dangerous is the offence To tire our patience, than mislead our sense. Some few in that, but numbers err in this ; Ten censure wrong for one who writes amiss : A fool might once himself alone expose : Now one in verse makes many more in prose.
Stran 34 - I will put my hook in thy nose, and my bridle in thy lips, and I will turn thee back by the way by which thou earnest.
Stran 56 - To tire our patience than mislead our sense : Some few in that, but numbers err in this; Ten censure wrong for one who writes amiss ; A fool might once himself alone expose ; Now one in verse makes many more in prose. Tis with our judgments as our watches, none Go just alike, yet each believes his own.
Stran 102 - I cannot but imagine the virtuous heroes, legislators, and patriots, of every age and country, are bending from their elevated seats to witness this contest, as if they were incapable, till it be brought to a favourable issue, of enjoying their eternal repose. Enjoy that repose, illustrious immortals...

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