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SUMMARY OF REQUIREMENTS FOR THE JUNIOR CERTIFICATE, INCLUDING

REQUIREMENTS FOR MATRICULATION Units of Credit.In this table the normal amount of work represented both by preparatory or high school subjects, and by the University courses, is specified quantitatively. In the University a unit signifies one hour per week of recitation or lecture, with preparation therefor, during one half-year. A course of study taken in the preparatory school for one year at five periods per week is valued at 3 units. Work in laboratory or field, or other work not requiring out-of-class preparation, is estimated at a lower rate than recitations and lectures.

(The requirements are stated in "units;" see above for explanation.)

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FOOTNOTES (1 to 9) TO TABLE 1. Matriculation.—The candidate for admission must have chosen his 45 units in such a way as to have a total of 12 units of subjects designated as "advanced,” including one of the following sciences, if taken with laboratory work, in the third or fourth year of the high school course: physics, chemistry, botany, zoology, physiology. Matriculants in the College of Agriculture should have completed either physics or chemistry; beginning August, 1915, such matriculants will be required to offer both physics and chemistry. Students who enter the University without the required work in science may remove this deficiency only by taking additional work in science after admission; a matriculation deficiency in chemistry or physics can be made up in the University only during the summer session. The preparatory subjects listed as "advanced” are 4, 5, 7, 9, 11, 12 (excluding the sciences of the first and second years of the high school), 13, 14, 15a®, 15a", 156, 156*, 150, 15c*.

Of foreign language (Greek, Latin, German, etc.) the student must have credit for 12 units, unless he has credit also for intermediate or advanced mathematics or surplus advanced science, in which case not to exceed 6 units of such work in science or mathematics or a combination of the two may be substituted for an equal amount of foreign language.

Applicants who expect to take up courses of study presupposing a knowledge of the elements of physics or chemistry, with laboratory practice (matriculation subjects 11, 12b), should take this work either during the high school course or during the university summer sessions. No equivalent for this work is offered during the regular sessions of the University. Applicants for the College of Letters, the College of Social Sciences, or for other courses of study requiring matriculation Latin, subject 6, should notice that the University does not offer instruction in this subject in any session.

2. Students at Large. Students at large are admitted to the University provided they have credit for 45 matriculation units (see page 63). They will be granted the junior certificate as students at large on completing the requirements given in this column and on passing examinations in subjects A and B, but will be granted the junior certificate as candidates for degrees only upon the completion of the requirements for the certificate as prescribed for regular students.

3. College of Letters.—The requirements in Greek and Latin are as follows: Matriculation Latin, 6'units; either matriculation or college Latin, 6 units; either matriculation or college Greek, 9 units; college Greek, 3 units; college Greek or Latin, or both, 6 units. Total, 30 units.

4. Colleges of Letters, Social Sciences (Plan A), and students at large.The requirements in mathematics and logic, for these groups of students, are as follows: A total of 12 units in mathematics, or in mathematics and logic

, with the following restrictions: there must be a minimum of 6 units of mathematics for matriculation (subjects 2, 3); those who enter the University with but 6 units of mathematics must complete the required 12 units by taking either 6 units in mathematics alone, or 6 units in logic alone; those who bring more than 6 and less than 12 units of mathematics for matriculation may complete the required 12 units either in mathematics, or in logic, or in a combination of the two.

5. Colleges of Social Sciences (Plan B), Natural Sciences, and Agricul. ture.-Students in these groups must have credit for 12 units in mathematics, without alternative for any part thereof.

6. Colleges of Letters, Social Sciences, Natural Sciences, Commerce and Agriculture, and students at large.—The prescribed work in science taken in college must be chosen from the fonowing fundamental courses:

Agronomy 6.
Astronomy 1, 2A-2E, 5, and 11.
Botany la, 1B, 2, 3.
Chemistry 1c, 1D or le, if no further courses in chemistry be taken.

Students who do not take lc, lp or le may use the following
courses in fulfillment of the science prescription for the junior

certificate: 14-1B, 5, or 6A-6B, 8A, 8B, 9.
Geography 1A, 1B, 3.
Geology 1a, 1B.
Entomology 1, 6, 27.
Mineralogy 1A, 18.
Palaeontology 1, 1A.
Pathology 1 (Bacteriology).
Physics 1A-1B, 2A-2B, 2C-20, 4A-4B, and 3A-3B.
Physiology 1, 2, and 5.

Zoology 1a-13 and 10. For students in Agriculture entering August, 1915, both matriculation physics, subject 11, and chemistry, subject 126, will be required. That portion of the 18 units of natural science which is done at the University must be chosen from the following fundamental subjects: general botany, general zoology, general chemistry, general physics, elementary bacteriology, introductory physiology.

Students in the College of Natural Sciences who pursue the regular technical Course in Architecture may substitute Drawing 2A-2B, 6 units, for an equivalent number of units of science in fulfillment of junior certificate requirements.

All references in these notes to specific courses of instruction apply to the courses as designated in the Announcement of Courses for 1914–15.

7. College of Social Sciences, Plans A and B for Junior Certificate.—For statement of the major subjects open in the upper division to students in the College of Social Sciences who qualify for the junior certificate by plans A and B respectively, see the Upper Division, below.

8. College of Commerce.- History, etc., must include: economic geog. raphy, 3 units; economic theory, 6 units; history and political science, 15 units. Mathematics must include college courses 2A (or its equivalent) and 2B, 10 units. Natural science must include physical geography, 3 units.

9. The junior certificate is not formally issued to students in the College of Agriculture until they have completed the summer field work, 6 units, following the sophomore year; this makes a total requirement of 70 units of university work for junior standing.

College of Medicine. For matriculation in the College of Medicinethe four years' course leading to M.D.--the student is required to obtain the junior certificate in any of the colleges at Berkeley, or to present evidence of an equivalent preparation. He must also give evidence of sufficient training in physics, chemistry and biology to enable him to pursue with profit the curriculum of the college and must possess a reading knowledge of French or German. The following courses now offered represent the minimum of satisfactory preparation in the sciences named (numbers refer to the Announcement of Courses for 1914–15): Physics 2A, 2B, and 3B or 4B; Chemistry 1A-1B, 8A-88, 9; Zoology la, 5.

Combined Academic and Medical Course.—Students in the colleges of Letters, Social Sciences, or Natural Sciences who have received the junior certificate, and who, in addition to the work for the junior certificate, have completed a full year of work in the upper division, may, at the beginning of their fourth or senior year in the University, register as students in the College of Medicine, and, upon completion of the first year in the College of Medicine, may receive the degree of A.B., B.L., or B.S. Students who enter the College of Medicine in accordance with the foregoing provisions will be expected normally to have completed 94 units of university work in the academic departments, including such work in major courses as may be acceptable to the faculty of the college in which the student proposes to take his academic degree.

The State law governing the practice of medicine in California pre ribes that every person before practicing medicine or surgery must produce satisfactory testimonials of good moral character and a diploma issued by some legally chartered medical school, the requirements of which shall have been at the time of granting such diploma in no particular less than those prescribed by the Association of American Medical Colleges for that year. The requirements for matriculation in the College of Medicine of the University of California as above stated cover also the requirements of the Association of American Medical Colleges, provided that credit for matriculation subject 5, History and Government of the United States, be included.

Students in the Technical Course in Architecture must complete all the requirements for the junior certificate either in Letters, in Social Sciences, or in Natural Sciences, including among either the prescribed or the elective studies: mathematics, 24 units; physics, 9 units; drawing, 16 units; civil engineering, 2 units; architecture, 6 units. The work in mathematics, physics, civil engineering and six units of the work in drawing is identical with the work in these subjects in the colleges of engineering.

THE UPPER DIVISION Students will not be registered in the upper division until all matric. ulation and lower division requirements have been completed.

The amount of work to be completed in the upper division is normally 60 units in the colleges of Letters, Social Sciences, Natural Sciences, Agriculture and Commerce, and 96 units in the colleges of Engineering; but extra credits for the junior certificate may effect a corresponding reduction in the work of the upper division provided the work of the student in the upper division be not reduced to less than 12 units in any half-year. The total number of units required for the bachelor's degree is stated on page 104.

Students in the colleges of Letters, Social Sciences, and Natural Sciences who receive honorable mention with the junior certificate and who devote the junior and senior years to strictly academic (non-professional) courses will be required to complete only fifty-one units in the upper division.

The work of the upper division must be extended over a period of not less than two years of residence. Two summer sessions are equivalent in point of residence to one half-year. Study-list limits per half-year in the upper division, 12-16 units; summer session, 4-6 units.

For the regulations governing foreign language requirements for major work and preliminary selection of the major subject see under junior certificate in earlier pages of this circular.

Major courses are certain advanced undergraduate courses commonly designated by the numbers 100-199 in the annual Announcement of Courses. Not all upper division courses are major courses.

The departments in which major courses may at present be taken are as follows:

1. Philosophy
2. Education
3. Jurisprudence*
4. History
5. Political Science
6. Economics
7. Anthropology
8. Oriental Languages
9. Semitic Languages
10. Sanskrit
11. Greek
12. Latin
13. English
14. German

15. Romanic Languages
16. Celtic
17. Slavic Languages
18. Music
19. Architecture
20. Mathematics
21. Physics
22. Astronomy
23. Geography
24. Chemistry
25. Botany
26. Zoology
27. Physiology
28. Hygiene

29. Geology and Mineralogy
30. Palaeontology
31. Anatomy
32. Pathology and

Bacteriology
33. Drawing and Art
34. Mechanical Engineering
35. Civil Engineering
36. Irrigation
37. Mining
38. Agriculture
39. Physical Education
10. Military Science

* Not more than twenty-six units of work listed in the professional curriculum in law shall be credited toward a bachelor's degree. The student may enroll for as much more as other regulations permit, but the excess over twenty-six will not be included in his schedule for graduation.

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