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The course in pathology aims to outline the natural history of disease. The instruction is for convenience divided into four correlated courses dealing respectively with causation, progress and effect.

101. Bacteriology and Protozoology.

Professor MEYER and Miss GRIFFITHS. Bacteriological methods are first taught; the preparation of culture

media, the isolation of bacteria in pure culture, and the more phology and cultural characteristics of bacterial species. The pathogenic bacteria are then taken up in relation to specific dis

The lower animal parasites concerned in systemic diseases are then considered. Lectures are employed for outlining general

principles, the work being largely practical. Second year, first semester. M Tu W F, 1-5, alternating with course 102.

4 units.

eases.

102. Infection and Immunity. Professor GAY and Miss GRIFFITHS. The course presents the most accessible aspects of functional path

ology. It traces the evolution of infectious diseases in the body and the mechanism of animal defense. Experimental methods of studying infection are demonstrated and so far as practicable carried out by the student. A systematic course of lectures will outline the principles of immunology with a consideration of their applicability in the diagnosis and treatment of disease. These lectures, but not the laboratory work, may be taken by non

medical students who have had at least course 1 or 2. Second year, first semester. Lectures M W, 11-12; laboratory M Tu W F, 1-5, alternating with course 101.

3 units.

103. Morbid Anatomy and Histopathology.

Assistant Professor Rusk and Dr. CHRISTIANSEN. The organ and tissue changes in diseases in the animal and particu

larly in the human body will be studied in this course. Macroscopic lesions will be illustrated by fresh material from autopsies and museum specimens, and the microscopic appearances will be studied by means of a loan collection of prepared slides. Experimental lesions are used to emphasize the evolution of such pro

The course includes systematic instruction in the conduct of autopsies at the Alameda County Hospital at which the students assist in small groups. This course, while largely prac

tical, is considered systematically in lectures and conferences. Second year, first semester. M W Th S, 8-11.

6 units.

cesses,

ELECTIVES 202. Research. Problems of Infection and Immunity. Professor GAY.

Hours and units to be arranged.

203. Research. Neuropathology.

Assistant Professor Rusk. Hours and units to be arranged.

204. Research. Bacteriology and Protozoology. Professor MEYER. The investigation of concrete problems suggested by the work in medical bacteriology.

Hours and units to be arranged. 205. Advanced Morbid Anatomy and Histopathology.

Assistant Professor COOKE. An elective course for fourth year and graduate students in medicine,

comprising autopsy technic and the working up of tissue and cul

tures resulting from post mortem examinations. Fourth year, second semester. University Hospital.

Hours and units to be arranged. 206. Seminar in Pathology.

The STAFF. Reports and discussions of current advances and individual research

in the field covered by the department. Open to Medical Students

and Graduate Students. Throughout the year, beginning September 1. Alternate Tu, 8 P.M.

No credit 207. Experimental Pathology.

Assistant Professor Rusk and Dr. CHRISTIANSEN. An elective course to which a limited number (not over six) especially

qualified students will be admitted. Experiments illustrating funetional changes as evidenced by chemical and physiological methods and tissue alterations will be undertaken and the results demonstrated to those in Pathology 103, which latter course it is intended to supplement. Special problems may also be undertaken. This course may also be taken as a graduate course by special arrangement.

208. Autopsy Course.

Assistant Professor COOKE. During the school year about 75 autopsies are performed at the

University Hospital and the University of California Service of the San Francisco Hospital. Provision is made for students of the third and fourth years to attend these autopsies. Members of the third year class under supervision of Dr. COOKE perform the autopsies, correlate clinical and post-mortem findings, make gross descriptions of the lesions found and later describe the microscopic appearance of the tissues.

HYGIENE AND PREVENTIVE MEDICINE WILBUR A. SAWYER, A.B., M.D., Lecturer in Hygiene and Preventive

Medicine.

SECOND YEAR

101. Lectures and Demonstrations in Hygiene and Preventive Medicine.

Dr. SAWYER. The course in Hygiene, Public Health, and Preventive Medicine,

through the courtesy of the State Board of Health, is given by Doctor SAWYER, Director of the State Hygienic Laboratory and is designed to meet the need of those who are to become medical practitioners. While fairly comprehensive in scope, it is not offered as a substitute for the especial training necessary to equip medical health officers. It does aim to emphasize the exact relations of the private practitioner to the public health. The scope of the course will include the following topics: The legal mechan. ism for the control of disease, vital statistics, transmissable diseases and their epidemiology, occupational diseases, milk supply in relation to public health, water supply and sewage disposal, food supply, meat inspection, disinfection, economic cost of dis

eases, saving through conservation, etc. Second semester, once a week.

16 hours.

THIRD YEAR 102A-102B. Lectures and Demonstrations in Hygiene and Preventive Medicine.

Dr. SAWYER. For description see Course 101. After this session the course will be

given only in the second year. First and second semesters, once a week.

32 hours.

MATERIA MEDICA AND PRACTICAL THERAPEUTICS

EUGENE S. Kila B.S., M.D., Instructor in Medicine.
ALBERT SCHNEIDER, Ph.D., M.D., Instructor in Materia Medica.
RENÉ BINE, M.D., Assistant in Medicine.

SECOND YEAR 101. Lectures and Demonstrations in Materia Medica. Dr. SCHNEIDER. This course supplements the courses in Experimental Pharmacology

and Therapeutics and will include lectures on the history of medical schools and cults; the source of drugs and medicines; newer remedies; the principal drugs used in modern medicine; the quality and purity of drugs and medicines; federal and state laws govern. ing the quality and purity of drugs; general toxicology; physiological antagonism; chemical incompatibility and prescription writing Considerable attention will be given to the newer biological products used in medicine including a discussion of their manufacture, standardization and use. The work is to be supplemented by class demonstrations explaining the more important general pharmaceutical processes, methods of alkaloidal extraction, chemical and physiological drug assaying, etc. Some attention will also be given to posology, drug habits, and habit-forming drugs; and the so-called narcotic drugs with the laws governing

their sale. Second semester, three times a week.

48 hours.

THIRD YEAR

102. Lectures and Demonstrations in Materia Medica. Dr. SCHNEIDER. For description see Course 101. After this session the course will

be given only in the second year. Second semester, three times a week.

48 hours.

103A-103B. Lectures and Recitations in Therapeutics.

Drs. KILGORE and BINE. Lectures, recitations, demonstrations and practical exercises on the

medical treatment of disease. By the use of material in the wards, emphasis is placed upon the application of therapeutic principles. Students are required to write specific directions for patients and for nurses and to execute many of the orders themselves. Com paratively few drugs are used. These occupy an important but by no means exclusive place in the teaching. Special attention is given to biologic methods, to diet, hydrotherapy, massage and other

physical and mechanical measures. First semester, once a week; second semester, twice a week.

48 hours.

MEDICINE*

HERBERT C. MOFFITT, B.S., M.D., Professor of Medicine.
WILLIAM Watt KERR, A.M., C.M., M.D., Clinical Professor of Medicine.
GEORGE E. EBRIGHT, M.D., Instructor in Medicine.
HERBERT W. ALLEN, B.S., MD., Instructor in Medicine.
EUGENE S. KILGORE, B.S., M.D., Instructor in Medicine.
RENÉ BINE, M.D., Assistant in Medicine.
JAMES LYMAN WHITNEY, A.B., M.D., Assistant in Medicine.
LEROY H. BRIGGS, M.D., Assistant in Medicine.
JULE B. FRANKENHEIMER, B.S., M.D., Assistant in Medicine.
HARRY E. FOSTER, M.D., Assistant in Medicine.
EDUORDO Taussig, M.D., Assistant in Medicine.
ELDRIDGE J. BEST, M.D., Assistant in Medicine.

Assistant in Medicine.
Earl H. CORNELL, B.S., M.D., Assistant in Medicine.
Hans LISSER, A.B., M.D., Assistant in Medicine.
MILTON ABRAHAMSON, M.D., Voluntary Assistant in Medicine.
LOVELL LANGSTROTH, A.B., M.D., Voluntary Assistant in Medicine.
JOSEPH H. CATTON, M.D., Voluntary Assistant in Medicine.

Instruction in Medicine is given both at the University Hospital and at the San Francisco Hospital.

At present students begin their work in this department at the University Hospital during the second semester of the second year. Two general introductory courses bridge the gap between the fundamental sciences and clinical medicine. Stress is laid upon instruction in history taking and physical diagnosis, and an endeavor is made to drill the student thoroughly at the very beginning in what may be termed a standard medical technic. This uniform technic in history taking, in recording physical and laboratory examinations will be applied in all the student's later dispensary and ward exercises and will be carried even farther into his work as clinical clerk and interne.

Pharmacology and Materia Medica also are taught in this semester, and thus students are prepared for their work in Therapeutics in the

third year.

In the first semester of the session 1914-15 instruction in clinical medicine will be given the third year class at the University Hospital and the fourth year class at the San Francisco Hospital. In the second semester the fourth year class is offered elective courses at the University Hospital, while the third year receives clinical instruction at the San Francisco Hospital.

* The Department of Medicine includes Neurology and Dermatology.

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