The Loyalists of America and Their Times: from 1620 to 1816, Količina 1

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W. Briggs, 1880 - 489 strani
 

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CHAPTER IV
85
The Presbyterians in 1646 seek liberty of worship at Massachusetts Bay
93
Colonial government according to Massachusetts Bay pretentions impossible
99
Petition of the Massachusetts Bay Court to the Long Parliament in 1651
108
Letters of remonstrance against these persecutions by the distinguished
116
Summary of the first thirty years of the Massachusetts Bay Government
122
PAGE
125
CHAPTER V
130
years before
133
The Kings letter of pardon and oblivion June 28 1662 in a note of
139
On account of the complaints and representations made to England the King
145
They address the King and enclose copies of their address with letters
152
Letters of Lord Clarendon and the Honourable Robert Boyle to the Massachu
160
The Kings reply to the long address or petition of the Massachusetts
166
Royal Charters to Connecticut and Rhode Island in 1663 with remarks upon
172
The narrative of the discussion of questions between Charles the Second and
178
Baptists persecuted by fine imprisonment c as late as 1666 and 1669
184
Remarks on the unfair statements and unjust imputations against the British
190
CHAPTER VI
204
of the accession of James the Second appointment of Joseph Dudley
212
SECOND ROYAL CHARTER AND THE GOVERNMENT OF MASSACHUSETTS UNDER
221
Unsuccessful efforts of Dr Increase Mather to obtain the restoration of the first
228
A small party in Boston opposed to accepting the new Charter Judge Story
235
MASSACHUSETTS AND OTHER COLONIES DURING THE SECOND WAR BETWEEN
242
Debts incurred by the New England Colonies in the Indian Wars issue
247
Mr Bancroft represents this war as merely European refuted by himself
248
Dispute between the Earl of Loudon and the Massachusetts Court in regard
255
Generals Abercrombie and Loudon at Albany hesitate and delay while
258
Attempt of the French to recover Quebec
266
CHAPTER IX
273
The effect of these Acts and measures in the Colonies
335
This circular displeasing to the British Ministry and strongly condemned by
341
Similar replies from the Legislative Assemblies of other colonies
343
CHAPTER XV
353
Governor Barnards recall and character in a note
359
The thirteen Colonies a unit for the defence of their constitutional rights
364
Collisions between the soldiers and inhabitants in Boston
365
CHAPTER XVII
374
The causes and the disastrous effect of the arrangement between the British
381
Remarks on the difference between his conduct and that of the Governors
387
Lord North explains the American policy the Bill to punish the town of
394
The fourth Act of Parliament legalizing the quartering of the troops in Boston
397
Third penal Bill for the immunity of governors magistrates and other public
403
CHAPTER XX
409
Manly and affectionate appeal to the British nation
416
THE REASSEMBLING OF PARLIAMENT THE 20TH OF JANUARY LETTERS
422
Remarks on the gross inaccuracies and injustice and empty promises of this
428
PARLIAMENT PROCEEDS TO PASS AN ACT TO PUNISH THE NEW ENGLAND
433
Governor Johnstone justifies the reception of it by example
439
The Kings answer a proclamation declaring the petition rebellion and
445
PASE tional rights
448
CHAPTER XXIV
459
Traditional and deep loyalty of the Virginians and their aversion to revolution
464
The question of questions with the Congress one Republican but the others
481
The Declaration of Independence reported discussed amended and adopted
487
Preliminary remarks on the impolicy and injustice to many thousands on both
493
The Declaration of Independence was a violation of good faith to those
499
Numbers character and position of Loyalists at the time as stated by Ameri
504
The Declaration of Independence was the avowed expedient and prelude
513

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Priljubljeni odlomki

Stran 411 - That the foundation of English liberty, and of all free government, is a right in the people to participate in their legislative council...
Stran 487 - He has refused for a long time, after such dissolutions, to cause others to be elected; whereby the Legislative powers, incapable of Annihilation, have returned to the People at large for their exercise; the State remaining, in the meantime, exposed to all the dangers of invasion from without, and convulsions within.
Stran 488 - He has constrained our fellow-citizens, taken captive on the high seas, to bear arms against their country, to become the executioners of their friends and brethren, or to fall themselves by their hands.
Stran 488 - For abolishing the free System of English Laws in a neighbouring Province, establishing therein an Arbitrary government, and enlarging its Boundaries so as to render it at once an example and fit instrument for introducing the same absolute rule into these Colonies...
Stran 151 - Let not an evil speaker be established in the earth : evil shall hunt the violent man to overthrow him. 12 I know that the LORD will maintain the cause of the afflicted, and the right of the poor.
Stran 232 - And further, full power and authority are hereby given and granted to the said General Court from time to time to make, ordain, and establish, all manner of wholesome and reasonable orders, laws, statutes and ordinances...
Stran 495 - With hearts fortified with these animating reflections, we most solemnly, before God and the world, declare, that, exerting the utmost energy of those powers, which our beneficent Creator hath graciously bestowed upon us, the arms we have been compelled by our enemies to assume, we will, in defiance of every hazard, with unabating firmness and perseverence, employ for the preservation of our liberties ; being with one mind resolved to die freemen rather than to live slaves.
Stran 319 - At the same time let the sovereign authority of this country over the colonies be asserted in as strong terms as can be devised, and be made to extend to every point of legislation whatsoever. That we may bind their trade, confine their manufactures, and exercise every power whatsoever, except that of taking their money out of their pockets without their consent.
Stran 415 - You have been told that we are seditious, impatient of government and desirous of independency. Be assured that these are not facts, but calumnies. — Permit us to be as free as yourselves, and we shall ever esteem a union with you to be our greatest glory and our greatest happiness...
Stran 421 - When your lordships look at the papers transmitted us from America, when you consider their decency, firmness, and wisdom, you cannot but respect their cause, and wish to make it your own.

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