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107. Problems in Literary Criticism.

Assistant Professor KURTZ. Problems in the evolution of literary types presented in out

line and illustrated by reference to several Books of the Old Testament. The general kinds and stages of literary evolution; the variety of literary technique shown in such

stages. Lectures and readings. 2 units. M Tu W Th F, 3. 19 North Hall.

Graduate Courses.

208. The Epic.

Assistant Professor KURTZ. Some national epic-probably the Odyssey-will be used as a

basis for investigation of one of the problems of epic theory. Individual research, bibliographical and literary;

presentation of reports, and discussion. 2 units. M Tu W Th F, 4. 19 North Hall. 209A. The Poetry of Edmund Spenser.

Assistant Professor SANFORD. A literary, critical, and historical study and interpretation of

the more important poems of Spenser from the Shepherd's Calendar to the Fairy Queen. Lectures, combined with individual research, reports, and discussions, on the various problems connected with Spenser's poetry. Constant illustrative reference to Spenser's models and literary sources, such as Virgil's Aeneid, Dante's Divine Comedy, Ariosto's Orlando Furioso, Tasso's Jerusalem Delivered, and Malory's Morte D'Arthur. This will be followed by a brief study of Spen. ser's influence on English poetry from his own time to William Morris. Either the Globe Spenser (Macmillan) or the Cambridge Spenser (Houghton Mifflin & Co.) is recom

mended as text. 2 units. M Tu W Th F, 10. LL Library. 209B, The English Romantic Movement.

Assistant Professor SAXFORD. A literary, historical, and critical study of English Romanticism

from Pope to Tennyson. This course takes account not only of the literature of Romanticism in Poetry and Prose in England, but also of the parallel movement in Germany and

France. Lectures, reports, and discussions. 2 units. M Tu W Th F, 10. LL Library.

NOTE.—Either 209A or 209B will be given to meet the needs and wishes of students.

GERMAN.

Paul ZIERTMANN, Oberlehrer at the Oberrealschule, Berlin-Steglitz,

Germany.
WILHELM R. R. PINGER, Ph.D., Instructor in German.
FRIEDRICH ALEXANDER WYNEKEN, M.L., Assistant in German.

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1. The Elements of German. (Double course). Mr. WYNEKEN. A rapid survey of the essentials of grammar, with reading of

easy prose and practice in translating into German, and in conversation. Spanhoofd's “Lehrbuch der deutschen Sprache.” Mueller and Wenckebach's "Glück Auf!” Satisfactory completion of this course will give credit for matriculation subject 1561 or for German A in the regular session. 4 units. No credit will be given to those who

have had a university course in German. M Tu W Th F, 8 and 1. 7 North Hall.

2. Advanced Elementary German. (Double course.)

Dr. PINGER. Grammar, composition, conversation; reading of stories and

plays. Spanhoofd 's “Lehrbuch der deutschen Sprache;' Bierwirth's “Elements of German;' Bernhardt's “Der Weg zum Glück;' Storm's "In St. Jürgen;" Wilbrandt's “Jugendliebe;" Groller's “Incognito;' selections from Klenze's “Deutsche Gedichte.” Open to students who have completed Course 1 or its equivalent. Satisfactory completion of this course will give credit for matriculation subject

15b2 or for German B in the regular session. 4 units. M Tu W Th F, 9 and 2. 7 North Hall.

3. Course for Teachers.

Dr. PINGER. This course is given in connection with German 2 and is de

signed for teachers both actual and prospective. Discus

sion of methods, scope, and aim of introductory German. F, 11. 7 North Hall.

104. Middle High German.

Dr. PINGER. Outlines of Grammar. Selections from the Nibelungenlied and

the Kudrun; Hartmann von Aue's “Der arme Heinrich."

Translation into modern German, 2 units. M Tu W Th F, 10. 7 North Hall.

105. Phonetics with Special Application to German.

Professor ZIERTMANN. The elements of phonetics with special reference to the pro

nunciation of English and German; the differences between the English and the German vowels and consonants; the

German accent; as much practice as possible. 1 unit. Tu Th, 11. 102 California Hall.

206. The Life and Works of Young Goethe.

Professor ZIERTMANN. After a brief discussion of the conditions of German literature

before 1770, the life, the character, and the literary achievements of young Goethe (until 1775) will be discussed, with collateral reading of the more important of his works. The

course will be given in German. 1 unit. M W F, 11. 102 California Hall.

FRENCH.

FREDERICK WILMSEN, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of French in the Summer Session.

JOHN A. CHILD, A.B., Assistant Professor of Italian.
ALFRED SOLOMON, M.A., Instructor in French.

1. Elementary French. (Double course.) Professor WILMSEN. Pronunciation, vocabulary, essentials of grammar, reading, con

versation. Satisfactory completion of this course will give credit for matriculation subject 15a1 or for French A in the regular session. 4 units.

M Tu W Th F, 1-3. 15в North Hall.

2. Advanced Elementary French.

(Double course.)

Mr. SOLOMON. Grammar, composition, reading, and conversation; review of elementary grammatical principles; practice in reading in French; drill in conversation; rapid reading and sight translation. Satisfactory completion of this course will give credit for matriculation subject 15a2 or for French B in the regular session. 4 units. Open to students who have completed course 1 or its equivalent.

M Tu W Th F, 8-10. 16 North Hall.

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103. Advanced French Composition. Professor CHILD. Translation into French of passages from standard English authors. A thorough systematic review of the syntax, especially of the verb. Open to students who have had at least three years of French. Armstrong's "Syntax of the French Verb," Henry Holt & Co., 1909. For students who do thoroughly satisfactory work, this course will be regarded as the equivalent of French 130c in the regular session. 2 units. M Tu W Th F, 9. 15в North Hall.

204. Seminar for the Study of Molière.

Mr. SOLOMON.

Careful intensive study of six or eight of the author's representative plays. Some attention to sources, and the author's object in writing certain plays; special study of Molière's language; comparison of it with present day French. 1 unit.

3 hours, to be arranged. 00 Library.

SPANISH.

JOHN TAGGART CLARK, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Romanic Languages.

PAUL BOEHNCKE, A.B., Instructor in Spanish in the Summer Session.

Mr. BOEHNCKE.

1. Elementary Spanish. (Double course.) Training in pronunciation, and in the essentials of forms; translation, conversation and composition. For beginners and those desiring to review the rudiments. Hills & Ford Spanish Grammar and 300 pages at least of reading Spanish novels and plays. Satisfactory completion of this course will give credit for matriculation subject 15c or for Spanish A in the regular session. 4 units.

M Tu W Th F, 8 and 1. 16в North Hall.

2. Advanced Elementary Spanish. Assistant Professor CLARK. Reading, composition and conversation, with a careful review of the essentials of grammar. Open only to students who have had one year of university Spanish or the equivalent. 2 units.

M Tu W Th F, 9. 16в North Hall.

3. Advanced Spanish. Assistant Professor CLARK. Rapid reading, composition and conversation. Conducted in Spanish. Open only to students who have had at least two years of university Spanish or the equivalent. 2 units. M Tu W Th F, 10. 16в North Hall.

ITALIAN.

JOHN A. CHILD, A.B., Assistant Professor of Italian.

1. Elementary Italian.

Professor CHILD.

Pronunciation, essentials of grammar, reading, conversation. Grandgent's Italian Grammar (D. C. Heath & Co.). This course is equivalent to Italian la of the regular session. 2 units.

M Tu W Th F, 8. 15в North Hall.

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