Paradise Lost: A Poem in Twelve Books

Sprednja platnica
T. Bedlington, 1826 - 294 strani
 

Mnenja - Napišite recenzijo

Ocene uporabnikov

Št. zvezdic: 5
3
Št. zvezdic: 4
2
Št. zvezdic: 3
1
Št. zvezdic: 2
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1 zvezdica
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LibraryThing Review

Uporabnikova ocena  - VivalaErin - LibraryThing

The shortest answer is: John Milton was a poetic genius. PL is so beautiful, you can't help but feel for Adam and Eve. Even Satan is a great character - he so wants to be an epic hero. This poem is a masterpiece, and he wrote it completely blind. Beautiful, absolutely amazing. Celotno mnenje

LibraryThing Review

Uporabnikova ocena  - StefanY - LibraryThing

Historical significance and beautifully descriptive prose aside, I couldn't get into this book at all. Maybe it's too much familiarity with the plot or the inevitability of the impending doom of the ... Celotno mnenje

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Priljubljeni odlomki

Stran 56 - And wisdom at one entrance quite shut out. So much the rather thou, celestial Light, Shine inward, and the mind through all her powers Irradiate ; there plant eyes, all mist from thence Purge and disperse, that I may see and tell Of things invisible to mortal sight.
Stran 210 - So saying, her rash hand, in evil hour, Forth reaching to the fruit, she pluck'd, she eat: Earth felt the wound; and Nature from her seat, Sighing through all her works, gave signs of woe That all was lost.
Stran 76 - O thou that, with surpassing glory crowned, Look'st from thy sole dominion like the god Of this new World — at whose sight all the stars Hide their diminished heads — to thee I call, But with no friendly voice, and add thy name, 0 Sun, to tell thee how I hate thy beams, That bring to my remembrance from what state 1 fell, how glorious once above thy sphere...
Stran 213 - Should God create another Eve, and I Another rib afford, yet loss of thee Would never from my heart : no, no ! I feel The link of Nature draw me : flesh of flesh, Bone of my bone thou art, and from thy state Mine never shall be parted, bliss or woe.
Stran 107 - Angels; for ye behold him, and with songs And choral symphonies, day without night, Circle his throne rejoicing; ye in Heaven, On earth join, all ye creatures, to extol Him first, him last, him midst, and without end. Fairest of stars, last in the train of night, If better thou belong not to the dawn. Sure pledge of day, that crown'st the smiling morn With thy bright circlet, praise him in thy sphere, While day arises that sweet hour of prime.
Stran 3 - OF Man's first disobedience, and the fruit Of that forbidden tree, whose mortal taste Brought death into the world, and all our woe, With loss of Eden, till one greater Man Restore us, and regain the blissful seat, Sing, heavenly muse, that on the secret top Of Oreb, or of Sinai, didst inspire That shepherd, who first taught the chosen seed, In the beginning, how the heavens and earth Rose out of chaos...
Stran 81 - But rather to tell how, — if art could tell,— How from that sapphire fount the crisped brooks, Rolling on orient pearl and sands of gold, With mazy error under pendent shades Ran nectar, visiting each plant, and fed Flowers worthy...
Stran 50 - O'er bog or steep, through strait, rough, dense, or rare, With head, hands, wings, or feet, pursues his way, And swims, or sinks, or wades, or creeps, or flies.
Stran 11 - Over the burning marie, not like those steps On heaven's azure ; and the torrid clime Smote on him sore besides, vaulted with fire.
Stran 85 - Ah, gentle pair, ye little think how nigh Your change approaches, when all these delights Will vanish and deliver ye to woe, More woe, the more your taste is now of joy...

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