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Applications for Scholarships.-Applications for undergraduate scholarships, with letters and testimonials connected therewith, should be in the hands of the Recorder of the Faculties at Berkeley on or before the firs day of April preceding the academic year for which the awards are to be made.

Awards will be announced in May, if possible, and notice thereof will be sent by mail to each applicant. Payments are made at the office of the Secretary of the Board of Regents, in California Hall, in ten monthly installments, beginning September 1st. A blank form of application may be obtained from the Recorder of the Faculties.

FELLOWSHIPS AND SCHOLARSHIPS,

FOR GRADUATES. NOTE.—Graduate scholarships and fellowships are awarded as a mark of honor, on the basis of scholarship--not of need; and the holders thereof are expected to devote all their time to their work in the University.

The University Fellowships.-In April, 1909, the Regents of the University provided for ten fellowships of the annual value of $400 each. For 1911-12 these fellowships have been awarded as follows: one in Mathe. matics, one in Palaeontology, one in Agricultural Chemistry, one in Astronomy, two in Zoology, one in History, and two in English. Applications should be made through the Recorder of the Faculties to the ('ommittee on Graduate Scholarships and Fellowships.

The LeConte Memorial Fellowship Fund has been established by the Alumni Association of the University, in memory of Professors John and Joseph LeConte. Its annual income is $600, which may be devoted to the support of one more fellowships, at the discretion of the Board of Administration of the Fund. Appointees must be graduates of the l'niversity of California of not more than three years' standing at the time of award; the sole test is superior excellence, as determined at its discretion by the Board; and recipients are to pursue their studies either at the University of California or elsewhere, as the Board may determine. Application forms may be obtained from the Recorder of the Faculties.

The John W. Mackay Junior Fellowships.-Under the terms of an endowment maile by Mr. Clarence W. Mackay of New York City, jointly with his mother, Mrs. John W. Mackay, the University of California has established two John W. Mackay Junior Fellowships in Electrical Engineering, of an annual value of six hundred dollars cach. These fellowships are open to all properly qualified university graduates. The object is not to facilitate ordinary engineering or scientific study, but to enable students who have completed a college course to do research work in electrical

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engineering, with a view to aiding the advance of the application of electricity to scientific and industrial purposes. The place of residence of those holding the fellowships is to be at the University of California. Experimental or other work, however, may be carried on outside the laboratories of the University.

The appointment to each fellowship shall be for one year, which appointment may, however, be renewed, at the discretion of the Academic Council of the University.

The Professor F. V. Paget Scholarship was created by the will of the late Madame Emmanuel M. Paget in memory of her husband, formerly Professor of French in the University. The will directs that the income of the fund shall be given annually to some deserving student in the department of French of the University of California. The award will ordinarily be made to a graduate student. The value of this scholarship is $150.

The Bonnheim Research Fellowship in English was founded in 1907 by Albert Bonnheim of Sacramento. Its value is $650 a year; and the reeipient may study at this or any other University. The fellowship is awarded on the basis of competition open to men of the graduating class or of the graduate body who are pursuing advanced studies in English. Applications, accompanied by an outline of academic career, testimonials, and a thesis (typewritten) in evidence of ability to conduct research, must be in the hands of the chairman of the Committee of Award (the head of the English Department) on or before the first day of May preceding the academic year for which the fellowship is desired. For further particulars apply to the chairman.

Lick Observatory Fellowships, two or three in number, are usually maintained annually by the University. The appointees devote their attention to graduate study and assist in the work of the Observatory.

The Whiting Bequest. A bequest of twenty thousand dollars was made in 1895, by the will of Harold Whiting, formerly Associate Professor of Physics in the University. The net income from this sum is expended under the joint direction of the President and the Professor of Physics of the University. In the years 1898 to 1902 a traveling fellowship (value $600) was maintained from that income. Since 1902 two traveling fellowships, of the value of $600 each, have been awarded. In cases of distinct merit, similar awards may be made from time to time, as an Eneouragement to advanced study and research in Physics.

The Yale Alumni Association Fellowship. Beginning 1901-02, the Yale Alumni Association of California bas awarded annually the sum of $300 (to which the authorities of Yale University agree to add an

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equal to the charge for tuition there) to some graduate of the University of California or of Leland Stanford Junior University, the money to be used by the recipient in the pursuit of graduate study at Yale University. Applications for the fellowship should be addressed to Mr. John Shepard Eells, Secretary of the Yale Alumni Association, 430 California street, San Francisco.

The Flood Fellowships in Economics. Two fellowships in Economics of $400 each per year have been established from the income of the fund donated to the University by Miss Cora Jane Flood. Application forms may be obtained from the Recorder of the Faculties.

The Willard D. Thompson Memorial Fund, established by the will of Mrs. Jennie D. Thompson of Salt Lake, as a memorial to her son, of the class of 1895, provides for scholarships for the higher education of worthy young men and women, residents of Utah, who shall have completed at least a four years' course of some high school of recognized standling. For the year 1911-12, the fund will support five graduate scholarships, yielding about $600 each.

The Harrard Club Scholarship. The Harvard Club of San Francisco has usually awarded annually since 1887 a sum of not less than $200 to some graduate of the University of California or of Leland Stanford Junior University, the money to be used by the recipient in pursuit of graduate study at Harvard University.

The James M. Goewey Scholarship, founded in January, 1904, by the family of the late James M. Goewey, yields about $250 annually, and is awarded to a student in one of the departments of natural science. At present the awards will be limited to graduate students. Applications should be filed with the Recorder of the Faculties on or before April 15. Blank forms of application may be obtained from the Recorder of the Faculties.

The Frank M. Pixley Scholarship was founded by Mrs. Amelia V. R. Pixley, who bequeathed to the University $3563.22 as an endowment to be administered by the Regents of the University of California.

It was the desire of the donor that the income from this fund should be used for the maintenance of some student in law. For 1910-11 the income of the endowment was $200.

University Fellowship in Pacific Coast History.—The Order of the Native Sons of the Golden West has provided for the payment annually to the Regents of the University of California the sum of $1500 for the maintenance of a fellowship in Pacific ('oast history. Candidates must be graduates of a university and must have done at least one year of gradwate work upon Pacific Coast history. They must present some written

work showing knowledge and capacity for research upon some subject in the history of the Pacific Coast.

The names of the candidates for the fellowship, with their qualifications and evidence of their training for historical research in the form of written work shall be submitted by the department of history of the University of California on or about the first of May in each year, to a committee chosen by the Grand Parlor of the Native Sons of the Golden West at its annual session, and the name of the candidate selected by the committee shall be submitted to the President of the University to be announced by him on Commencement Day. The holder of the fellowship may be a candidate for re-election upon submitting proof of his fitness, either by thoroughness of the work done during the year of his term, or by promise for the completion of larger investigations.

Applications for Scholarships and Fellowships.-Applications for all fellowships or scholarships in the gr

luate school, with letters and testimonials connected therewith, should be in the hands of the Recoriler of the Faculties at Berkeley on or before the first day of March preceding the academic year for which the awards are to be made.

Awards will be an. nounced during April, if possible, and notice thereof will be sent by mail to each applicant. Payments are made at the office of the Secretary of the Board of Regents, in California Hall, in ten monthly installments, beginning September ist. A blank form of application may be obtained from the Recorder of the Faculties.

SPECIAL LECTURESHIPS. The Barbara Weinstock Lectureship on the Morals of Trade was created by Mr. Harris Weinstock of Sacramento on May 14, 1902, with an endow. ment of $5000. The purpose of the lectureship was stated by the founder to be the education of young men "to the belief that success in business is more profitable and more lasting if conducted upon a high ethical plane, and that true success lies in developing character, rather than in heaping up gold." The lecture does not form a part of the regular courses of

instruction

The Charles M. Hitchcock Endowment Fund of $10,000 was established by Mr. Hitchcock as an endowment for "a professorship in the University of California for free lectures upon scientific and practical subjects, but hot for the advantage of any religious sect, nor upon political subjects.”'

UNIVERSITY EXTENSION.

The Department of University Extension was organized during the year 1902-03 to carry on, as the work of a separate department of the University, extension courses in different parts of the State of California. Courses of University Extension lectures, with classes for study in connection with the lectures, are given wherever University Extension Centers may be organized, and the control and selection of these courses is left entirely to the committees of the various local centers. Each course consists of twelve lectures delivered at fortnightly intervals on days and in places chosen by the local committees, and University credit is given for work done in the University Extension classes after regular examinations. University Extension Traveling Libraries, containing several copies of the books needed for study in connection with the lectures and classes are sent to the local centers, and for courses in which they are needed lantern slides and other illustrative material are also supplied. It is the function of the Department of University Extension at the University to aid in the formation of centers and to supply lecturers, not necessarily members of the instructing staff of the University, to meet the requirements of these local centers. Particulars with regard to the cost of University Extension courses, the manner of organizing local centers, the aims and scope of extension work, and the credit towards a University degree to be obtained by doing the work laid out for Extension classes, can be found in the circular on University Extension, which will be sent on application to the Secretary of University Extension, University of California, Berkeley. Syllabuses of the courses at present offered by the Department can be obtained at the rate of ten cents a copy.

During the year 1910-11 four University Extension centers successfully maintained and in each of these four centers a University Extension course of lectures was delivered. One course on “Problems of Twentieth Century Citizenship’ was given Sonora by Thomas H. Reed, Associate Professor of Government; one course in Sacramento on “The Physiography of California,” by R. S. Holway, Assistant Professor of Geography; a course in Napa, given jointly by Professors Holway, Scholz, and Smith; and a course on “The End of the Eighteenth Century and Europe," by Professor H. Morse Stephens, under the auspices of the Mechanics' Institute of San Francisco.

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