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1061. Introduction to Psychological Experiment.

Dr. Browx. Characteristic groups of experiments, with individual practice. Sen

sation, Emotion, Perception; with especial reference to psycho

logical analysis. 4 hrs., 2 units, first half-year. Tu Th, section I, 10 to 12; section II,

1 to 3. Prerequisite: course 22 or 2B. 1061. Introduction to Psychological Experiment.

Dr. BROWN. Time-perception, Movement, Memory, Association; with especial refer

ence to methods of measurement. 4 brs., 2 units, second half-year. Tu Th, section I, 10 to 12; section

II, 1 to 3. Prerequisite: course 2a or 2B. Courses 1064 and 106B supplement each other, but either may be taken separately.

theory.

Dr. Brown. 106c. Laboratory Practice. Experiments supplementing courses 1064 and 1063, and affording an

opportunity for more thorough work in the same subjects. 2 hrs., 1 unit, either half-year. Hours to be arranged. *124. History of Psychology.

Professor STRATTON. Psychological theory and method through early Hindu and Greek

thought, and thence to the present time. 3 hrs., second half-year. M W F, 3. Though not a prerequisite, course

2A would be advisable as preparation. 1332-1333. Advanced General Psychology.

Dr. BROWN. Lectures, recitations, and reports, upon special aspects of modern

2 hrs, throughout the year. Tu Th, 9. Prerequisite: course 2A. *134. Abnormal Psychology. The mental physiology underlying the pathology of the mind; mental

dissociations, syntheses, special pathology; methods of examination and treatment of mental abnormality. 2 hrs., second half-year. MW, 4.

Mr. BECKER. A philosophic criticism of the presuppositions and methods of the 3 hrs., second half-year. M W F, 2. Prerequisite: course 1.

Dr. LEWIS. Introduction to their systems by a comparative study. 3 hrs., first half-year, M W F, 10. Prerequisite: course 103A-103B. read the Plato and the Aristotle in the original.

Course may be counted as a major in Greek, for students who Not to be given, 1911-12.

110. Logic of Science.

sciences.

116. Plato and Aristotle.

This

121. English Philosophy from Hobbes to Spencer.

Mr. BECKER. A critical study of the development of empiricism. 3 hrs., first half-year. MWF, 10. Prerequisite: course 103A-103B.

123. German Idealism after Kant.

Dr. LEWIS. Fichte, Schelling and legel: a study of the development of the

Kantian philosophy in Germany. 3 hrs., second half-year. Prerequisite: courses 103A-103B and 105, if

this has not been completed previously.

*129. Philosophy of Religion.

Assistant Professor ADAMS. The nature, types, and development of religion; the interaction be.

tween religion and reflective thought; the relation between religion

and art, science, morality. 3 hrs., second half-year. MW F, 8. Prerequisite: course 103A-103B.

*1294. Philosophy of Religion. Honor course in connection with the preceding. 5 units. Students in

this course should register for 129H, not for 129.

137. Advanced Ethics.

Assistant Professor POPE. 3 hrs., second half-year. Hours to be arranged. Prerequisite: course

104A-104B.

138. Continental Rationalism in the Seventeenth Century. Mr. BECKER. A detailed study of Descartes, Spinoza, and Leibnitz, with some atten

tion to their contemporaries. 3 hrs., second half-year. MW F, 10. Prerequisite: course 103A-103B.

139. Political Philosophy.

Mr. BECKER. Historical and critical study of philosophical theories of the state. A

constructive attempt to determine fundamental political principles, 3 hrs., first half-year. MWF, 2. Prerequisite: course 104A-104B.

140A-140B. Psychological Experiments.

Professor STRATTON and Dr. BROWN. A study of special yet connected problems, by means of experiment,

reading, and discussions in common, The general topic for the work of the year 1911-12 will probably be Suggestion without

Hypnosis. Not less than 6 hrs, throughout the year. 3 units. Units and hours

to be arranged with each student, at times within M Tu W Th F, 10-12 and 1-4. Prerequisites: 1069 and 106b, or their equivalents.

* Not to be given, 1911-12.

140AH-140BH. Psychological Experiments.

Professor STRATTON and Dr. BROWN. Honor course in connection with the preceding. 10 hrs., 5 units,

throughout the year. Students in this course should register for 140AH-140BH, not for 140A-140B.

FREE ELECTIVE COURSES.

352-35B. Nineteenth Century Thought.

Dr. LEWIS. Some of the chief philosophical movements of the nineteenth century,

and their relations to science, literature, and religion. 2 hrs., throughout the year. Tu Th, 9.

36A-36B. Aesthetics.

Assistant Professor POPE. The definition, types, and standard of the Beautiful; the Beautiful in

Nature and in the Fine Arts; the relation between aesthetic values

and ethical and religious values. 2 hrs., second half-year. Tu Th, 10.

GRADUATE COURSES.

The qualifications for each course are indicated in its prerequisite. Qualified undergraduates may be admitted by special permission of the

officers in charge.

2114-211B. Theory of Knowledge.

Professor RIEBER. Logic as the method of truth. Development and criticism of the

leading theories of knowledge, aiming at a constructive result. 2 brs., throughout the year. Tu Th, 8. Prerequisite: a good knowl

edge of Kant's critical writings, and of the attempted continuation

of his principles by Fichte and Hegel. 21184-211BH. Theory of Knowledge.

Professor RIEBER. Honor course in connection with the preceding. 5 units each half

year, Students in this course should register for 211AH-211BH, not

for 211A-211B. 213A-2138. Psychological Seminar.

Professor STRATTON and Dr. BROWN. The investigation of special problems, selected with regard to the

individual interest of those electing the work; reports and dis2 hrs., consecutive, throughout the year, Tu, 8-10 p.m. Prerequisite:

course 106A and 1063 or 133A-133B. 215A-215B. Psychological Research.

Professor STRATTON and Dr. Brown. Special problems, assigned individually for original investigation in

cussions.

the laboratory.

Not less than 8 hrs., throughout the year, 4 units each half-year; but

at least 12 hrs., 6 units each half year, recommended. Units and hours arranged with each student, at times within M Tu W Th F, 10-12 and 1-4. Prerequisite: courses 1064 and 106B, or their equivalent; permission to elect the course, obtained from the instructor in charge.

220A-220B. Philosophical Seminar.

Professor RIEBER. Subject for 1911-12: Hegel's Logic. 2 hrs., consecutive throughout the year. Hours to be arranged. Pre

requisite: Thorough acquaintance with the history of metaphysical and logical theories.

22041-220BH. Philosophical Seminar.

Professor RIEBER. Honor course in connection with the preceding. 5 units, each half

year. Students in this course should register for 220AH-220BH, not for 220A-220B.

In addition to the foregoing regular courses, special lines of study will be arranged for qualified graduates who are candidates for higher degrees, or who wish to carry on advanced work.

EDUCATION. ALEXIS F. LANGE, Ph. D., Professor of the Theory and Practice of Edu

cation. CHARLES E. Rugh, M.L., Associate Professor of Education. *W. Scott THOMAS, A.B., Assistant Professor of Education and Examiner

of Schools.
HERBERT G. Lull, M.A., Acting Assistant Professor of Education.
RICHARD G. Boone, Ph.D., Lecturer in Education.
ELMER E. Brown, Ph.D., Honorary Professor of Education.
Johx Swert, M.A., Honorary Lecturer in Education.
David P. Barrows, Ph.D., Professor of Political Science.

Undergraduate and graduate courses are offered in the history and the theory of education, which may serve non-professional as well as professional purposes. It is believed that such courses provide instruction which is desirable for the ends of individual culture and training and as preparation for that intelligent participation in public and private education which good citizenship demands of educated men and women.

Seminar courses are intended to serve the purpose of graduate students who wish to engage in research in the field of education, and particularly those who are candidates for higher degrees.

prerequisite to a major subject in the department of

Philosophy 1 (Logic), or Zoology 1 or Physiology 1, Philosophy 24 or 28 (Psychology), and Philosophy 104A-104B (Ethics). The course in ethies may, however, be taken concurrently with work in the major subject. The major subject may include one of the following

Jurisprudence 109 (School Legislation in California), Economics 12 Contemporary Theories of Social Reform), Economies 150' ("The Child and the State), and Hygiene 2 (Public Health).

Special provision is made for the professional training of teachers, of Ind. Those preparing to become teachers in secondary schools or in tificates of the high school grade are issued, see Circular of Information

For the conditions under which recommendations for Teachers' c'erfor the Academic Colleges. Requirement (b) Professional knowledge, of those conditions, must be satisfied by twelve units in the department of edueation. For the year 1911-12 those units may be made up as follows: I. Either Education 103B (History of Education: Later Periods), 3

units; or Education 125 (The History of American Education), 3

The courses education are

courses:

three classes:

colleges.

units.

* Absent visiting schools, second half-year, 1911-12.

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